Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Grass fed chickens... page 2

  1. #11
    Nick's Avatar
    Nick Guest

    1

    Primal Fuel


    Chicken fat is much more polyunsaturated than beef or pork fat, up to around 25% poly. That means the grain-fed/natural-fed difference is going to have a much greater effect on total excess Omega-6 you're eating.

    Chickens don't really eat grass, but they do need healthy grass, because the bugs that they do eat eat that grass. Since we've been having a drought here the eggs from my farmer have been getting more yellow and more of them are bad.


    Chickens are a fundamentally jungle animal, bred originally from the red junglefowl. They are used to being in a jungle where it always rains a lot and there are tons of bugs and other stuff around. When you put them in non-equatorial latitudes that have droughts, the only way to keep them alive sometimes is to supplement with other types of feed.


    That said, I've heard they will even happily peck the marrow out of chicken bones if you let them.


  2. #12
    BarbeyGirl's Avatar
    BarbeyGirl is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    SW Idaho farmland
    Posts
    928

    1



    My chickens eat grass.


    I can't let them free-range as I'd like to (they tear up my garden too much), but I pick them 10 gallons of mixed grass, weeds, and accompanying bugs daily. They love the stuff & it balances the omega 3's/6's in their eggs.


    I also give them as many vegetable and fish scraps as my kitchen can produce.


    And, sadly, I have to supplement some with commercial scratch grains to be sure they get enough calories. I try to keep this to a minimum, though.

    Nightlife ~ Chronicles of Less Urban Living, Fresh from In the Night Farm ~ Idaho's Primal Farm! http://inthenightlife.wordpress.com/

    Latest post: Stop Being Stupid

  3. #13
    lbd's Avatar
    lbd
    lbd is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    29

    1



    Yes, chickens do eat grass, clover, sometimes other plant parts. They love my tomatoes However, their veggie eating seems to take second fiddle to insects and the like, which they really love and will search diligently for throughout the day. Unfortunately, that means that any mulch I put in my flower gardens is thoroughly scratched through and removed to the surrounding grass, so they can find the ants, grubs, earthworms below.


    From the bird seed I feed them to supplement their diet, they eat the sunflower seeds first, then the millet, then the corn. In conventional chicken feed, they often ignored the wheat completely. I don't bother buying that anymore. Smart birds.


  4. #14
    10climbe's Avatar
    10climbe Guest

    1



    we have free range chickens and they will spend all day in the yard just foraging. They love eating all kinds of bugs and leftover food-stuffs. I think the chicken equivalent to grass fed beef is a truly free range bird. Also a good way to tell how healthy the bird is and what it was fed is to see the eggs. I was shocked when I first cracked open a fresh egg. The yolk was a dark orange, the way it was supposed to be!


  5. #15
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
    OnTheBayou is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida, USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
    Posts
    152

    1



    "Smart birds," indeed! Unlike us.


  6. #16
    Agnieszka's Avatar
    Agnieszka Guest

    1



    For those of you who live near Trader Joe's, I was just there and delighted to see that they have free range, organic chickens.


  7. #17
    Nick's Avatar
    Nick Guest

    1



    Nearly everything at TJ's is still CAFO unless it's something specific like wild-caught salmon or specifically the grass fed beef and lamb from NZ or Australia (which they don't stock anymore).

    Per federal regulations, free range means there is a tiny door in the side of the huge barn the chickens are in so they can go out into a little mudpatch if they want. They are still raised at a density of 4 chickens per square foot. Organic just means they didn't put pesticide on the grains they feed them. Any claims of hormone free, etc. are BS because it's been illegal to use hormones on poultry for decades.


    Likewise with their eggs. Of course once you learn to recognize the color, taste, and firmness of real eggs, you can tell; it doesn't matter what they put on the label.


  8. #18
    Agnieszka's Avatar
    Agnieszka Guest

    1



    That's disheartening. But at least they're cleaner than a chicken I can pick up at a conventional grocery store, right?


  9. #19
    Nick's Avatar
    Nick Guest

    1



    Maybe marginally better? I admit that I do sometimes buy the chickens from Trader Joe's, and find them to be totally edible. I prefer to buy chickens from two of the guys at the farmer's market I go to (both supplement with grain when we're in a drought, but the chickens get raised on more like 100 per acre rather than 40000 per acre, and genuinely have room to run around, including sometimes out of the fence and near my car when I'm there picking stuff up), but they don't always have them with regularity, because area restaurants will decide to put chicken on their menu for a few weeks and buy up several cases worth.


    My key points would be to buy better if you can get it, especially if you're going to eat it all the time, but that it's otherwise fine for you. One thing you can do if you want to address the excess Omega-6 in grain fed chickens is eat less of the fat from those chickens (discard the skin, etc.), whereas on a real natural chicken you would of course eat the delicious skin.


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •