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    bisforbella's Avatar
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    If our diet is balanced, there wouldn't be a need for vitamin supplements.

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    Before I went LCHF I used to take fish oils and other such vitamins, but that because I wasn't getting the right nutrition through my diet. Now that I have the right balance of nutrients, I don't need to take anything. Surely if we all just ate the right food it would be more effective than just taking supplements?


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    John Caton's Avatar
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    Of course your statement is correct, but it's the word "IF" that matters. It's unlikely anyone in the civilized world eats a truly balanced diet. The problem is that we may think we're eating a balanced diet but we really aren't. And there are other issues as well; such as absorbency problems that diet, balanced or not, will not cure. An example is B12 that isn't absorbed easily by the aged from either diet or ingested supplements. Sublingual B12 is needed, regardless of diet.

    One should not simply assume they're eating a balanced diet and forego supplements IF there are symptoms of nutritional deficiency. On the other hand, one should not turn to supplements if their needs can be met with food.

    Other aspects of lifestyle matter as well, regardless of diet. One may eat a perfectly balanced diet but stay indoors out of the sun most of the time. That person's balanced diet isn't going to provide optimal vitamin D levels. Vitamin A probably will suffer as well.

    One may eat a balanced diet, get sunshine, but be sedentary. That person will likely have hormonal issues from their lack of movement. A supplement won't cure that, but neither will their balanced diet.

    One may eat a balanced diet, get plenty of sunshine and exercise faithfully, but stay up until midnight in front of a computer or TV. They are likely to have sleep issues eventually and need a melatonin supplement.

    Do we or don't we supplement? We have to learn what's going on in ourselves and what needs we have, individually. We also need to know how our whole lifestyle contributes to our experience.
    Last edited by John Caton; 06-08-2015 at 02:59 AM.
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    bisforbella's Avatar
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    If our diet is balanced, there wouldn't be a need for vitamin supplements.

    Thanks john greatly appreciated for that response! Amazingly accurate and bang on point to what I understand as well:-) of course it's good to question even more however.

    Of course in this "civilised" world many key things that nurture the wellbeing of humans have been eradicated and interfered with massively. Mostly why we have all these supposed "mental problems" such as depression and anxiety (and many others) in my opinion. As well as physical! Basic needs completely abandoned in the diet, and active bodies exploring the outside always absent. Then with the "food" companies that pay no attention to health, the defects are covered up with the "health" industry that pays no attention to food.

    It's even questionable if we still even know what healthy or unhealthy is, because most of "nature" is being manipulated by cultivating livestock, plants and other such things. Which boils down to the point... How do we actually know anything we are doing is right? Or can we actually achieve our needs in this ever corporate growing world?

    But I suppose we can only do our best to adapt with this changing environment



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    Last edited by bisforbella; 06-08-2015 at 12:07 PM.

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    It also depends on how many nutrients/vitamins/minerals there actually are in those foods we eat (because of soil depletion, pollution and so on).
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    Micronutrients are crucial, thankfully most of them have a broad range of sufficiency. Plants and animals suspend micronutrients in their cell membranes so the big step is simply to get one's energy from recently-living tissue versus extracts (oil, sweetener, milled grain). A week of civilized dinners that includes some eggs, seafood, organs, and produce should contain nearly everything.

    Two possible exceptions are vitD and magnesium because historically we got the majority from non-food. Midday sun is great but some regions have long grey winters. And untreated water contains photosynthetic microbes which means chlorophyll (Mg)--nowadays that's not available or advisable.
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    As picklepete mentioned, it's possible that magnesium supplementation would be beneficial for a lot of people. Ideally I'd like to meet all my nutritional requirements through food alone, but I believe that traditionally most people got their magnesium through water. Even those of us eating paleo and primal probably aren't out there collecting and sterilizing our own river water, but instead rely on tap water or filtration systems etc, which are practically devoid of magnesium content.

    Soil depletion is a problem too, in that not only are foods high in magnesium comparatively rare and difficult to eat in sufficient quantities, but even foods that should be high in magnesium may not be. Hence supplementation may be prudent.

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    We're born and raised damaged. So are our foodstuffs in this modern era. Not even exclusively organic foods can repair certain genetic mutations (although the foods can go a long way in ameliorating the existing damage.) Damaged people may require much more of certain nutrients than their ancestors since they are not only trying to live daily lives with optimum nutrition, but to recover from or repair existing maladjustments. That is why vitamin minimums based on healthy young subjects are a crock - almost everyone contemplating vitamin/mineral supplementation already knows his/her health is nowhere near optimal.

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    If our diet is balanced, there wouldn't be a need for vitamin supplements.

    All very valid points
    Last edited by bisforbella; 06-08-2015 at 12:18 PM.

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    bisforbella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by picklepete View Post
    Micronutrients are crucial, thankfully most of them have a broad range of sufficiency. Plants and animals suspend micronutrients in their cell membranes so the big step is simply to get one's energy from recently-living tissue versus extracts (oil, sweetener, milled grain). A week of civilized dinners that includes some eggs, seafood, organs, and produce should contain nearly everything.

    Two possible exceptions are vitD and magnesium because historically we got the majority from non-food. Midday sun is great but some regions have long grey winters. And untreated water contains photosynthetic microbes which means chlorophyll (Mg)--nowadays that's not available or advisable.
    I have a great source of micronutrients and I have a good intake cooked eggs on the fire each morning but enough so the white is thick and the yolk is runny, with sammon and a bone broth most of time. the occasional rabbit caught and eating the heart, liver and brain raw occasionally!



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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightly Orange View Post
    As picklepete mentioned, it's possible that magnesium supplementation would be beneficial for a lot of people. Ideally I'd like to meet all my nutritional requirements through food alone, but I believe that traditionally most people got their magnesium through water. Even those of us eating paleo and primal probably aren't out there collecting and sterilizing our own river water, but instead rely on tap water or filtration systems etc, which are practically devoid of magnesium content.

    Soil depletion is a problem too, in that not only are foods high in magnesium comparatively rare and difficult to eat in sufficient quantities, but even foods that should be high in magnesium may not be. Hence supplementation may be prudent.
    I thought that magnesium is found in foods as well?

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