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Thread: How did plains Indians get iodine and iodide? page

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    RittenRemedy's Avatar
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    How did plains Indians get iodine and iodide?

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    No kelp
    No seafood
    No Iodols

    How did they get it?


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    Neckhammer's Avatar
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    Eggs? Milk? Is buffalo meat and organs totally void of it? I wouldn't think so, but I don't have that data.

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    Eating glands? Humans aren't the only ones that need iodine, and the thyroid in animals works much the same as in humans. Eating the glands could provide a substantial amount.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jfreaksho View Post
    Eating glands? Humans aren't the only ones that need iodine, and the thyroid in animals works much the same as in humans. Eating the glands could provide a substantial amount.
    That makes sense. I wonder where the animals got it then. Maybe leftover in the soil from ancient seas?


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    The only thing of found on the Internet is that freshwater fish also have iodine in their skin, just not as much as salt water. Where does it come from I wonder? I know very little about iodine. Is it an inorganic compound present in the sea? Is it made by bacteria and algae living in the water? If the latter, that would make sense as to an I land source for fish and animals (and people).


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    Iodine is a mineral found in the soil, it's not just an aquatic nutrient. Some plants do a good job of taking it in, so herbivores easily get it that way. So the natives would get it from plants and animals, especially since they didn't have the soil mineral loss we are experiencing nowadays.

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    Things Wikipedia taught me about iodine:

    It's on the periodic table (I totally forgot!)

    It's highly water soluble, which explains why it's mostly an ocean thing. Rainwater (and probably intensive agriculture) leach iodine.

    Dietary sources are sea things, but also dairy and eggs and vegetables grown in iodine rich soil.

    No sure how to source foods from iodine rich soil. Fortunately, I love fish. I guess if I ever raise chickens I'll be sure to use a little seaweed in the garden compost lol.


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    Quote Originally Posted by RittenRemedy View Post
    Things Wikipedia taught me about iodine:

    It's on the periodic table (I totally forgot!)

    It's highly water soluble, which explains why it's mostly an ocean thing. Rainwater (and probably intensive agriculture) leach iodine.

    Dietary sources are sea things, but also dairy and eggs and vegetables grown in iodine rich soil.

    No sure how to source foods from iodine rich soil. Fortunately, I love fish. I guess if I ever raise chickens I'll be sure to use a little seaweed in the garden compost lol.


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    Quote Originally Posted by RittenRemedy View Post
    No sure how to source foods from iodine rich soil. Fortunately, I love fish. I guess if I ever raise chickens I'll be sure to use a little seaweed in the garden compost lol.
    use fish remnants as fertilizer and compost. there are lots of fish processing companies, like from here in gloucester mass., that grind up the "bits" and sell it.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    Ernest Hemingway

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    Don't forget trade. Inland natives carried on trade with other, more coastal natives with oolichan grease (from fermented smelt-like fish) and dried fish. Archeologists have been stunned to find just how extensive trade routes reached. Look at some here.
    Indian Trade Route Map | National Museum of the American Indian

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