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    shemdogg's Avatar
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    Figs. Berry-like or Fleshy Fruit-like?

    Primal Fuel
    1st time poster longtime lurker

    Figs are pretty good but obviously they contain a lot of sugar. How would you folks categorize them? Anyone know anything about the origin of the fig? Has it evolved significantly since when Grok was around? Anything else nutritionally noteworthy about them?

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    AutumnP's Avatar
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    Wish I knew.... fresh figs are my favorite food ever. Except maybe butter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AutumnP View Post
    Wish I knew.... fresh figs are my favorite food ever. Except maybe butter.
    Agreed!
    Started PB late 2008, lost 50 lbs by late 2009. Have been plateaued, but that thing may just be biting the dust: more on that later.

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    The fig is actually the flower of the fig tree. Figs have been mentioned in records from the ancient Sumerians and Assyrians. According to Wikipedia:

    The edible fig is one of the first plants that was cultivated by humans. Nine subfossil figs of a parthenocarpic type dating to about 9400–9200 BC were found in the early Neolithic village Gilgal I (in the Jordan Valley, 13 km north of Jericho). The find predates the domestication of wheat, barley, and legumes, and may thus be the first known instance of agriculture. It is proposed that they may have been planted and cultivated intentionally, one thousand years before the next crops were domesticated (wheat and rye).[2]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/common_fig

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    Every year I get excited about the ripening figs in my backyard. But I'm not so excited this year after reading this:

    http://animals.howstuffworks.com/insects/fig-wasp.htm

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