Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Hammocks page

  1. #1
    Vainamoinen's Avatar
    Vainamoinen is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    E. Sx
    Posts
    49

    Hammocks

    The women's breasts guy (Syd Singer) also made some interesting comments on sleeping positions on the Evan Brand podcast. I think he has more on his site

    Killer Culture | Sydney Ross Singer | Preventing and Curing Culturogenic Disease

    but I haven't had time to look yet.

    What he said, in which I think he'd find a fair degree of agreement is that sleeping on your back with your head slightly raised is the best posture. It's notable that some tribal people have been recorded as sleeping with their head on a large stone. The Nuer even carve wooden headrests:

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=nu...w=1247&bih=600

    It's not a good thing for the head to drop back.

    If you sleep on your side, you have instead to put the pillow under your neck rather than your head - and some people have to use a second pillow between their knees, because that posture encourages the hips to close, which can put strain on the knees and cause pain for some.

    Singer was actually more concerned about the side-sleeping posture than anyone I've heard before. He claims that he's even seen people who have noses that have gone to the side from using this sleeping position - they've presumably been sleeping on one side only and ramming their face into the pillow, if this is correct!

    He's of course correct to say that on your back is the most neutral and sensible position, that it allows the back to stay open and take the weight, and that it won't result in pressure on internal organs. But it's difficult for many people to sleep like this, because of force of habit.

    And this is Singer's particular area of interest - how habits that we don't even think about, particularly habits that are "cultural", can be damaging to our health. Rolling up into something like a foetal position, is just more "comfortable" for many of us even though it is from a third-person viewpoint less comfortable (i.e. producing more strain), simply because they are so used to it. And when you try to change habits like that, you immediately encounter resistance in yourself at an almost visceral level. At the general level I think this whole notion of habitual "cultural" problems is a very interesting subject, as he says.

    Singer also claims that to have the head of the bed itself slightly raised is helpful for many people. He suggests that, otherwise, blood tends to pool in the head and you feel congested on waking. I'm not sure he's right here - isn't the pillow (or stone!) raising one's head enough? But perhaps not.

    He says that, however, if you do raise the head of the bed you have the problem that (a) you tend to slide down the bed during the night and that (b) blood tends to pool in your legs and feet. The solution to both problems, he suggests, is to raise your legs by putting a second pillow under them. That's interesting: I'm reminded of resting positions that ease the lower-back by getting people to put their legs up on an armchair while lying on the floor - a better way to use an armchair than sitting in it probably!

    Singer went on from here to say that when you have the head and the feet raised like this the lowest part of the body is the buttocks, and pointed out that this is what you get in a hammock. Again, I don't know whether he's right but this is an interesting observation. I think we often think of lying so that the spine is straight. But then again it has natural curves - and actually the lumbar curve doesn't straighten out when you're lying down on your back unless you do have the feet up! Besides, maybe the spine adopting a gentle curve in a hammock is no kind of problem. Interesting to think about.

    Singer then gave a new kind of twist on this, and possible support for it, by taking of his medical hat and putting his anthropological one on. He observed that early man, and hominids, likely often built hammocks in trees. As far as I know he's right in this - I think they did, and for the obvious reason that it gets you up out of the reach of predators (at least those that can't climb) while you sleep. He also said to Evan Brand that ourang-outangs build hammocks. I guess I'd have called them "nests" but what's in a name? And I suppose in effect they are a kind of hammock.

    Have a look at the second picture down on this page:

    How Orangutans Make (Comfy) Beds | Earth in Transition

    This did get me thinking. Like most people I use a bed. Although I don't mind sleeping on the floor, it's not something I, unlike really hardcore paleo people, generally do. But maybe a hammock would be even more paleo than a floor.

    And sailors seem to have been comfortable enough in them. They were used at sea, because you couldn't fall out when the ship was pitching and rolling. And navies liked them, because when they were taken down, rolled up and put away, deck space was cleared for cannon to be used. You were also buried sewn in your hammock, cannon ball being used to weight it.

    DRAKE he's in his hammock an' a thousand mile away,
    (Capten, art tha sleepin' there below?)
    Slung atween the round shot in Nombre Dios Bay,
    An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe.
    As I say, I don't know if Singer is right on some of this, but he has got some interesting arguments, both medical/physiological and anthropological.

    Anyway, has anyone tried a hammock? If you did, how did you find it?

    I had a friend who had one in his garden and who delighted in taking an afternoon nap it - he found it very comfortable.

  2. #2
    Mr. Anthony's Avatar
    Mr. Anthony is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,867
    I keep trying to convert to a back-sleeper, but I always still sleep on my side. I just can't sleep well on my back. I'd love to sleep that way, especially because it's easier camping, which I do regularly enough. I'll keep trying.

    I DO take freaking awesome naps in a hammock (usually camping), and can sleep decently well at night in one, but they're usually too chilly and they make me feel like a bear feeding trough.

  3. #3
    Abyss's Avatar
    Abyss is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    139
    I use a camping hammock with a wool blanket instead of a tent and sleeping bag when camping, and have considered switching to sleeping in a hammock full time. However, I have great difficulty getting to sleep when anything about my sleeping habits change, so I fear that were I to sleep in a hammock at home I'd never be able to sleep on a bed again!

  4. #4
    fifer's Avatar
    fifer is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Fife, Scotland
    Posts
    378
    Problem with renting rather than owning your place - can't just bang two big loop bolts in the walls for this kind of crazy experiment!

  5. #5
    Abyss's Avatar
    Abyss is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    139
    Well, a hammock stand could be easily made from pipe or wood...

  6. #6
    Eich's Avatar
    Eich is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    326
    Are you looking for a hammock? Have you been to your local city's hammock district?

  7. #7
    Sonoran hotdog's Avatar
    Sonoran hotdog is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    346
    There are a number of hammock sleeping fanatics (including me) on the Hammock Forums:

    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/forum.php

    You'll find posts there from people who have converted to full-time hammock sleeping.

    I sleep exclusively on a hammock when backpacking/camping, and find it much more restful than sleeping in a mattress. So why don't I sleep in a hammock at home? Doesn't work with two people...

    I sleep equally on my back and sides in my hammock (and many positions in between). Side sleeping is surprisingly comfortable in a good Brazilian-style hammock where you sleep on the diagonal, and fairly level.

  8. #8
    Vainamoinen's Avatar
    Vainamoinen is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    E. Sx
    Posts
    49
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by fifer View Post
    Problem with renting rather than owning your place - can't just bang two big loop bolts in the walls for this kind of crazy experiment!
    I love this! I really was laughing audibly as I read it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •