Mortality Results from a Randomized Prostate-Cancer Screening Trial
From 1993 through 2001, we randomly assigned 76,693 men at 10 U.S. study centers to receive either annual screening (38,343 subjects) or usual care as the control (38,350 subjects). Men in the screening group were offered annual PSA testing for 6 years and digital rectal examination for 4 years. The subjects and health care providers received the results and decided on the type of follow-up evaluation. Usual care sometimes included screening, as some organizations have recommended. The numbers of all cancers and deaths and causes of death were ascertained...The incidence of death per 10,000 person-years was 2.0 (50 deaths) in the screening group and 1.7 (44 deaths) in the control group (rate ratio, 1.13;95% CI,0.75 to 1.70). The data at 10 years were 67% complete and consistent with these overall findings.
The group assigned to receive more thorough screening for prostate cancer suffered a higher all-cause mortality rate. This suggests it is healthier to simply be unaware of potential prostate cancer, then to screen for it and treat whatever cancer is found.

I'm consistently impressed with how bad our current medical system is.