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    Veggiepants's Avatar
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    New forum member: Questions about naturally ripened fruits

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    Hi everyone! Happy to have joined the community.

    Question for all of you:
    Can I get a hold of naturally-ripened fruit in the midwest (Chicago) in the winter?

    I ask because I recently received the results from an ELISA/ACT delayed hypersensitivity panel, and found that I have a strong sensitivity to Petroleum. I did some research, and found that Ethylene, a petroleum derivative, is used as a ripening agent in pretty much all commercially available fruit. I already called Trader Joe's corporate today and was told that they cant guarantee ethylene-free fruit. I have a call into Whole Foods, and should hear back tomorrow.

    This is just an add-on and neither here nor there, but I'm not comfortable with entering ketosis, so, I'll prob up my intake of quinoa, carrots, etc - stuff that I didn't eat much before (because my primary sugars were from berries, citrus, stone fruits, etc.)

    Any advice, thoughts or comments would be greatly appreciated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Veggiepants View Post
    Hi everyone! Happy to have joined the community.

    Question for all of you:
    Can I get a hold of naturally-ripened fruit in the midwest (Chicago) in the winter?

    I ask because I recently received the results from an ELISA/ACT delayed hypersensitivity panel, and found that I have a strong sensitivity to Petroleum. I did some research, and found that Ethylene, a petroleum derivative, is used as a ripening agent in pretty much all commercially available fruit. I already called Trader Joe's corporate today and was told that they cant guarantee ethylene-free fruit. I have a call into Whole Foods, and should hear back tomorrow.

    This is just an add-on and neither here nor there, but I'm not comfortable with entering ketosis, so, I'll prob up my intake of quinoa, carrots, etc - stuff that I didn't eat much before (because my primary sugars were from berries, citrus, stone fruits, etc.)

    Any advice, thoughts or comments would be greatly appreciated.
    That would be nearly impossible I think. Picking unripe fruit, and artificially ripening it just before market is what allows fruit to be used out of season and non-locally. Aside from your petroleum allergies, it isn't very healthful for anyone.

    Suggestion from my perspective is to eat locally grown, naturally ripened fruit, in season.

    Secondary suggestion, if the first is unacceptable, is to eat organically grown, frozen fruits. The presumption is there would be less need to artificially ripen them.
    Last edited by John Caton; 01-06-2015 at 03:02 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Caton View Post
    Secondary suggestion, if the first is unacceptable, is to eat organically grown, frozen fruits. The presumption is there would be less need to artificially ripen them.
    Ditto.
    The texture is poor but the flavor is often superior. I don't know anything about ethylene content but inquiring into your available brands should be possible.
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    i might even narrow this to frozen organic berries since those are picked ripe. frozen wild blueberries are easily found too.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

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    Elliot's Avatar
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    What about dried fruit?

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    Dried fruit becomes a source of high sugar, and it take good willpower to stop eating it at the same equivalence as the fresh fruit. Dang near impossible!

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    bazzz's Avatar
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    Ethylene is a gas which is naturally produced by fruits when they ripen. Do you have any reason to believe you're specifically sensitive to ethylene?

    Also, it sounds like the whole ELISA/ACT thing is probably complete hokum: Allergies: Dubious Diagnosis and Treatment

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    As an update:

    I contacted the major supplier of Ethylene for fruit ripening, Catalytic Generators (Ethy-Gen&reg II Ripening Concentrate), and found out that their product is made with a grain-based ethanol, not a petroleum base. To get more info, I asked for further information regarding their conversion of ethanol to ethylene, but the CEO explained that he couldn't disclose any further, as it was a "trade secret". He did explain, however, that because I am petroleum-sensitive, I should stay away from his product, as the container storing Ethy-Gen II is made of petrochemicals.

    Thanks for your suggestions - I agree that locally grown, naturally ripened is the way to go. I'll look into the frozen fruit too - it'll definitely keep my smoothies optimally palatable!

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    I'm not sure if you're entirely serious. All plastics are made from petrochemicals, so you should be steering clear of anything made from plastic. Which is quite difficult.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bazzz View Post
    Ethylene is a gas which is naturally produced by fruits when they ripen. Do you have any reason to believe you're specifically sensitive to ethylene?

    Also, it sounds like the whole ELISA/ACT thing is probably complete hokum: Allergies: Dubious Diagnosis and Treatment
    My rationale is multi-faceted.

    Back to the beginning: I had been getting bumps and redness on my face, neck and arms, combined with heinous cystic acne. My derm recommended topicals that only exacerbated the inflammation, but my GP recommended that I try Elisa/ACT testing. The results that came back were really interesting; I found out that my lymphocites go into overdrive when exposed to propylene glycol, benzene, toluene, and petroleum. (FYI, propylene glycol, benzene and toluene are all by-products of petroleum processing.)

    I eliminated sources of contaminants, and my skin issues improved dramatically, but not 100%. So, I decided to dig further and see if I could find any other sources of "hidden" petroleum. I found out that Ethylene is (can be) a petroleum derivative, and my main source of Ethylene in my diet is... wait for it... fruit.

    While Ethylene is the hormone that causes fruit to ripen, the sources of Ethylene that are used to promote ripening in storage rooms are synthetic. Technically the synthetic and natural forms are the same chemical compound, but Ethy-Gen II comes from a completely different source than the Ethylene produced by fruits. In my emails back and forth with the CEO of Catalytic Generators, he claimed that he believed there was "no difference" between sources of Ethylene.

    Frankly, if that were the case - and if the CEO really believed what he said - would he have been so adamant to explain that his source wasn't from petroleum, and was instead derived from grain? Logically, you can see that he negated his own claim.

    After I couldn't the response I had hoped for, I decided to check the MSDS sheet for his product. (http://lib.store.yahoo.net/lib/catal...SDSNOV2014.pdf)

    I found that Ethy-Gen II contains Ethanol, Ethyl Acetate, and Isopropyl Alcohol. So, even if his product doesn't use petroleum derivatives in the manufacturing process, a petroleum derivative - Isopropyl Alcohol - is one of the end-product ingredients.

    That, for me, is enough to stay away from Ethanol-ripened fruit for now.

    *And, as an add-on: It seems like your link takes issue not with the ELISA panel, but instead, takes issue with the supplement-peddling practitioners who use it. My GP didnt recommend any supplements (frankly, I spent enough on my test and wouldn't have purchased supplements anyway), so it wasn't an issue for me. However, given that the critique is more practitioner-centric, do you take issue with other medical practitioners that peddle, for example, blood sugar meds, when dietary and exercise intervention can have similar effects? I'm not trying to troll - truly, I'm just trying to figure out your mindset.

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