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    smerchant@plusd.org's Avatar
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    Glycemic Load

    I'm a little confused about the GL. Is it important that each individual item you eat stay under 10-20, or should the meal as a whole be under 10-20?


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    IIRC if a healthy person's starches are (a) unprocessed and (b) in a mixed meal it's very difficult to break >150 BG so I wouldn't sweat it.

    If a person it not healthy they should use a blood meter and not guess.
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    are you diabetic?
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    Ernest Hemingway

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    No, not diabetic


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    I don't think the glycemic load is especially important. It's related to the glycemic index, which has been studied heavily, but never seems to matter. Example:
    No difference in body weight decrease between a low-glycemic-index and a high-glycemic-index diet but reduced LDL cholesterol after 10-wk ad libitum intake of the low-glycemic-index diet
    Results: Energy intake, mean ( SEM) body weight (LGI diet: −1.9 0.5 kg; HGI diet: −1.3 0.3 kg), and fat mass (LGI diet: −1.0 0.4 kg; HGI diet: −0.4 0.3 kg) decreased over time, but the differences between groups were not significant. No significant differences were observed between groups in fasting serum insulin, homeostasis model assessment for relative insulin resistance, homeostasis model assessment for β cell function, triacylglycerol, nonesterified fatty acids, or HDL cholesterol. However, a 10% decrease in LDL cholesterol (P < 0.05) and a tendency to a larger decrease in total cholesterol (P = 0.06) were observed with consumption of the LGI diet as compared with the HGI diet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smerchant@plusd.org View Post
    I'm a little confused about the GL. Is it important that each individual item you eat stay under 10-20, or should the meal as a whole be under 10-20?
    I'm not sure the numbers mean very much. Glycemic Load is an attempt to try to make the Glycemic Index system more workable. But any system of this sort seems to be vitiated by the fact that adding one type of food to another -- buttering a slice of bread, say -- changes its glycemic index.

    I think it's a lot of unnecessary fuss for people. I think it's better just to get a feel for which foods to avoid -- or merely minimise if your needs, or preferences, are less stringent -- and which to eat. Simple as that.


    If you want to quantify anything, it's grams of carbs that is the one to measure.

    You start by getting a (very rough) handle on how much protein to eat for your lean bodymass, for which Mark provides an equation ... And you then forget that! … In other words, don't worry about it -- just get a feel for what portion size of a high-protein food (fish, meat, eggs, cheese, etc.) equates to that and eat very roughly at around that.

    Then the only number you ever have to pay attention to is number of grams of carbohydrate a day, eating at wherever it is you want to be on Mark's Carbohydrate Curve for your purposes:

    How many carbs should I eat each day? | Mark&#039;s Daily Apple

    But, again, once you have a feel for what that means in terms of foodstuffs on a plate, you don't really need to measure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elliot View Post
    I don't think the glycemic load is especially important. It's related to the glycemic index, which has been studied heavily, but never seems to matter. Example:
    No difference in body weight decrease between a low-glycemic-index and a high-glycemic-index diet but reduced LDL cholesterol after 10-wk ad libitum intake of the low-glycemic-index diet
    Except, of course, the noted reduction in LDL cholesterol. And, without reading the study, I predict lowered Triglycerides as well.

    For people who are concerned about their cardio vascular health and the potential to eventually develop metabolic syndrome it is, IMO, beneficial to at least understand the glycemic load of what they eat. Particularly as one passes through middle age.

    Sure people who are young and active thrive on good many carbs - but that isn't likely to last forever for most people.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdot View Post
    Except, of course, the noted reduction in LDL cholesterol. And, without reading the study, I predict lowered Triglycerides as well.
    Nope.
    No significant differences were observed between groups in fasting serum insulin, homeostasis model assessment for relative insulin resistance, homeostasis model assessment for β cell function, triacylglycerol, nonesterified fatty acids, or HDL cholesterol.
    I really doubt the 10% change in LDL means anything, either. They're just hanging on to the one thing that changed because they don't want to admit their idea is pointless.

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    So what does this mean? We should all go back to eating our refined, high gi foods if we prefer them?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elliot View Post
    I don't think the glycemic load is especially important. It's related to the glycemic index, which has been studied heavily, but never seems to matter. Example:
    No difference in body weight decrease between a low-glycemic-index and a high-glycemic-index diet but reduced LDL cholesterol after 10-wk ad libitum intake of the low-glycemic-index diet
    Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the long-term effects of a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet with either low glycemic index (LGI) or high glycemic index (HGI) on ad libitum energy intake, body weight, and composition, as well as on risk factors for type 2 diabetes and ischemic heart disease in overweight healthy subjects.

    Design: The study was a 10-wk

    <<snip>>
    10-weeks is long-term?
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    Ernest Hemingway

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