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Thread: Kids and the Primal diet page

  1. #1
    nzreddragon77's Avatar
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    Kids and the Primal diet

    I am in the lucky predicament of having two beautiful children, aged 7yrs and 1yr, and am finding huge success in doing the primal diet. However I am having issues in trying to figure out how to transfer my kids over from a high grain diet. I don't always get to feed them as they are supplied food at kindercare (for the one year old) and by the grandparents, for both of them, during the weekdays - I do give them breakfast and dinner, and try to put together a fairly low carb/grain lunch for the 7yr old for school.

    So my question is, as a busy working mum, how do I ensure my kids, especially the oldest one, are able to transition to this way of life without making them feel deprived? And how do I teach them about why there is such a change. I know it seems easy when I read peoples stories on here but I am really struggling with it. My 7yr is extremely fussy - she now eats red meat which has only happened since we started buying direct from the farm, but she is resistant to eating eggs (no allergies that we can detect) and anything salad related (although I know how she feels as I have always struggled with salad myself!).

    Any advice you can give would be appreciated - and any ideas too!! I've tried getting her involved in the food making decisions and preparing but we have lived so badly for so long that she has certain high grain dishes ingrained in her and thats all she wants.

    Thanks for listening

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    Urban Forager's Avatar
    Urban Forager is online now Senior Member
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    Personally I'm not anti carb/grain when it comes to kids, but gluten is something we try to avoid. White rice is fine and I'm okay with gluten free breads for my son. He goes through times when he wants almond butter and jam sandwiches and times when he won't eat them at all.

    I just try not to to put too much pressure on eating because it can back fire. If she doesn't like salads, fine they aren't essential to a healthy diet. My son is now 16 and has never eaten a salad, he does eat raw carrots and cucumbers though and plenty of other veggies. Most kids like fruit and fruit has just about all the nutrients as vegetables so why not just let her eat them instead?
    Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nzreddragon77 View Post
    I am in the lucky predicament of having two beautiful children, aged 7yrs and 1yr, and am finding huge success in doing the primal diet. However I am having issues in trying to figure out how to transfer my kids over from a high grain diet. I don't always get to feed them as they are supplied food at kindercare (for the one year old) and by the grandparents, for both of them, during the weekdays - I do give them breakfast and dinner, and try to put together a fairly low carb/grain lunch for the 7yr old for school.

    So my question is, as a busy working mum, how do I ensure my kids, especially the oldest one, are able to transition to this way of life without making them feel deprived? And how do I teach them about why there is such a change. I know it seems easy when I read peoples stories on here but I am really struggling with it. My 7yr is extremely fussy - she now eats red meat which has only happened since we started buying direct from the farm, but she is resistant to eating eggs (no allergies that we can detect) and anything salad related (although I know how she feels as I have always struggled with salad myself!).

    Any advice you can give would be appreciated - and any ideas too!! I've tried getting her involved in the food making decisions and preparing but we have lived so badly for so long that she has certain high grain dishes ingrained in her and thats all she wants.

    Thanks for listening

    Do not deprive them of ample carbohydrates... As growing children they need all the food, vitamins, and minerals they can get. If they want almond butter and apples let them go all out. Just make sure they eat real whole foods.

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    MaceyUK's Avatar
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    Kids like potatoes so use them wherever you can as a carb source. Learn how to make pancakes using bananas, mashed vegetables, eggs, almond flour etc, there are loads of websites with recipes. Make some bone broth and use it as a base for soups and gravies which kids will usually eat. Get them on pate as soon as you can and learn how to make your own.
    Don't sweat the stuff that you can't control so let them get on with it at parties. My 6 year old boy will happily eat eggs and bacon every morning, my 4 yr old girl has a sweet tooth and it's a struggle to get her to eat properly but I am not going to give up...until she has left home.
    Man seeks to change the foods available in nature to suit his tastes, thereby putting an end to the very essence of life contained in them.
    www.primaljoy.co.uk

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    Hampshire Girl's Avatar
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    I'm working on this one with my almost 2yo. Unfortunately the only potatoes he seems keen on are chips of the kind you get in restaurants. He ignores mash and baked and only occasionally eats roast potatoes. He's also not keen on joined up meat.

    I've given in a bit because he was getting fussy about it, so he has a little bread. I make pancakes without wheat flour though and omelettes most days. He will eat fruit and Greek yoghurt until it comes out of his ears.

    It's an anxiety inducing subject for me - I get plenty of mother's guilt because he doesn't eat as high quality a diet as we do.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Hampshire Girl View Post
    I'm working on this one with my almost 2yo. Unfortunately the only potatoes he seems keen on are chips of the kind you get in restaurants. He ignores mash and baked and only occasionally eats roast potatoes. He's also not keen on joined up meat.

    I've given in a bit because he was getting fussy about it, so he has a little bread. I make pancakes without wheat flour though and omelettes most days. He will eat fruit and Greek yoghurt until it comes out of his ears.

    It's an anxiety inducing subject for me - I get plenty of mother's guilt because he doesn't eat as high quality a diet as we do.


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    You can make chips in the oven by slicing a potato into chip size strips, and roasting in coconut oil or beef dripping.

    If you dont have any junk in the house and don't go to junk restaurants, there's no option but to eat real food.
    Last edited by fifer; 11-03-2014 at 01:05 PM. Reason: Spling

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    Yeah, the only thing we have with the kids is we don't buy bread, so there's none in the house to make toast sandwiches with.

    However, when they are out, we have no problem with them eating crackers/biscuits at a shared spread, and they can eat all the rice/potatoes/kumara they want.

    Carbs are not the enemy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hampshire Girl View Post
    I'm working on this one with my almost 2yo. Unfortunately the only potatoes he seems keen on are chips of the kind you get in restaurants. He ignores mash and baked and only occasionally eats roast potatoes. He's also not keen on joined up meat.
    Well, kids can easily get acclimated to eating junk if that's what they are exposed to. Our food philosophy was '20 yucks to 1 yum'. Which is that kids will turn up their noses at a new food 20 times before they accept it.

    They still object to mushrooms, and we still keep serving them up (with them only required to eat a single mushroom on their plate before offloading the rest to me). When we eat out with other families, I'm kinda shocked at how picky and whiny all of thier kids are with food. Ours just eat everything.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hampshire Girl View Post
    I've given in a bit because he was getting fussy about it, so he has a little bread. I make pancakes without wheat flour though and omelettes most days. He will eat fruit and Greek yoghurt until it comes out of his ears.
    That all sounds fine.

    I helped our 7yo make some homemade dark loaves a couple of days ago (real bread!) and they still have a loaf top go.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hampshire Girl View Post
    It's an anxiety inducing subject for me - I get plenty of mother's guilt because he doesn't eat as high quality a diet as we do.
    Hey, I know how militant we were with our first. We told my helpless parents off many a time for giving her biscuits. And now our third eats pieces of chocolate before he is two. Don't die in a ditch over it, and you don't need to be so militant about it.

    About the only things I would remain vigilant about are fruit juice/coke and sugary biscuits.
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

    Griff's cholesterol primer
    5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
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    My problem is that my son (9) is vegetarian. And he doesn't like eggs. That makes it challenging to get enough protein in him AND figure out how to make two meals at a time with a busy schedule, while avoiding wheat in my house. :/

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    Urban Forager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zannster View Post
    My problem is that my son (9) is vegetarian. And he doesn't like eggs. That makes it challenging to get enough protein in him AND figure out how to make two meals at a time with a busy schedule, while avoiding wheat in my house. :/
    You've got your work cut out for you. All I can add is make sure you give him B12 supplements, possibly iron too. I hope he likes dairy, cottage cheese is a good, quick source of protein.
    Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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    MaceyUK's Avatar
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    Buy some whey and mix it into a home made chocolate milkshake. He'll like that.
    Man seeks to change the foods available in nature to suit his tastes, thereby putting an end to the very essence of life contained in them.
    www.primaljoy.co.uk

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