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Thread: Anyone know of any off the grid primal communities? page 5

  1. #41
    Carnivor0us's Avatar
    Carnivor0us is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by AuroraB View Post
    So, just out of curiosity, what does this primal friend of your's do for a living to be able to live like that. It sounds incredible.
    I know, what a lucky bastard

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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by AuroraB View Post
    So, just out of curiosity, what does this primal friend of your's do for a living to be able to live like that. It sounds incredible.
    Not sure, I do know she's retired, sold her house in SoCal and decided to do the move after visiting the islands. I'm definitely planning on a visit to check out the island and now playing with the idea of organizing some 3 to 5 day Primal retreats there.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuck416 View Post
    Recently I've been envisioning pulling together some like minded people and building an environmentally friendly and sustainable off the grid primal community consisting of mid size homes surrounded by organic gardens and fruit trees with pastured animals located in a temperate climate. Would want enough power generated to enjoy some modern conveniences (internet connections etc). If you ever hear of such a community being built or in existence please let me know.Thanks! -

    johnsaville21@gmail.com

    PS-Ha Ha...Not planning on a cult or dropping out of society! More like an example of how people can live with sustainability and mindfulness.
    So, kinda like the Amish but with internet connection?
    "It's true, you are a good woman. Then again, you may be the antichrist."

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilovesteak View Post
    So, kinda like the Amish but with internet connection?
    Ha ha!...Sort of, but I prefer to call it the new modern. Never before have we had access to the kind of recycled building materials, energy efficient devices and alternative energy tools that we have today and they are getting better and less expensive at an extraordinary rate. Combine this with a more enlightened understanding of how we can be more mindful in our lifestyles - buying or growing our own local and organic produce when possible, eating pastured meats, free range poultry and wild fish, supporting community gardens etc. All of these things are I believe creating a new opportunity to organize our living experience in exciting new ways. Access to the internet is vital because it connects us with our tribe of like minded thinkers, sharing the ideas and best practices that will help us fine tune and explore a variety of options to the process.
    Last edited by canuck416; 08-18-2014 at 08:40 AM.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Urban Forager View Post
    A big factor in making a sustainable community is the price of the land. It is very hard to make a farm pay for a mortgage, produce a profit and support the members of the community. If you take away the mortgage it makes it more feasible.

    As I've stated where I live a lot of people live off the grid, most of them make their living off the land by growing a crop that once was worth a lot. Those that bought their land years ago when land was cheap and the crop they grew sold for a lot did okay. OTH the ones that moved here in the last few years paid way too much for their property and now the price of their crop has plummeted. I predict we'll be seeing quite a few off the grid properties for sale in the next few years as the older folks start moving to town and the young ones find that they can't make a off living off the land anymore.

    So if you're looking to buy an off the grid set up and you don't need the land to produce $$$ it may be worth looking into.
    Thanks for the insight and suggestion. I also think that some of those farmers focused too heavily on large mono crops and some needed to rely on government farm subsidies to keep them viable as they were susceptible to global market fluctuations. What I envision are smaller more mixed farms supplying farm to table food for locals rather than the factory farming concept currently the norm in the American farming community. This is already currently happening successfully here in Sonoma County and many other places, not only here in the States but around the world. We can learn from these examples and by sharing best practices can help make this a viable option.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuck416 View Post
    Thanks for the insight and suggestion. I also think that some of those farmers focused too heavily on large mono crops and some needed to rely on government farm subsidies to keep them viable as they were susceptible to global market fluctuations. What I envision are smaller more mixed farms supplying farm to table food for locals rather than the factory farming concept currently the norm in the American farming community. This is already currently happening successfully here in Sonoma County and many other places, not only here in the States but around the world. We can learn from these examples and by sharing best practices can help make this a viable option.
    Ummm......I would guess they were not getting govt subsidies for the crop in question,

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuck416 View Post
    Thanks for the insight and suggestion. I also think that some of those farmers focused too heavily on large mono crops and some needed to rely on government farm subsidies to keep them viable as they were susceptible to global market fluctuations. What I envision are smaller more mixed farms supplying farm to table food for locals rather than the factory farming concept currently the norm in the American farming community. This is already currently happening successfully here in Sonoma County and many other places, not only here in the States but around the world. We can learn from these examples and by sharing best practices can help make this a viable option.
    Yeah, no subsidies for cannabis. A lot of these places I'm referring to have mixed farms/animals, off the grid solar, grey water systems, hydro, that sort of thing. Just north of you, probably a lot more rustic than Sonoma.
    Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Urban Forager View Post
    Yeah, no subsidies for cannabis. A lot of these places I'm referring to have mixed farms/animals, off the grid solar, grey water systems, hydro, that sort of thing. Just north of you, probably a lot more rustic than Sonoma.
    Of course! Mendocino, should of realized what crop you were referring to.
    Last edited by canuck416; 08-14-2014 at 11:05 PM.

  9. #49
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    Molokai is amazing and pretty primitive in a lot of ways. I've been three times and we were planning to go back this January before the new house stuff started. You can in fact gather pineapple, coconut and bananas from around the island and the local fisherman do sell right off the boat when they come in. I like to tell people there is no beach sharing on Molokai. If you walk down to a beach and someone is there you go to the next cove so you have you're own space.

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