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Thread: I'm your man on the inside :) page

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    voodoo-anarchy's Avatar
    voodoo-anarchy is offline Junior Member
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    I'm your man on the inside :)

    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    err... woman, rather. 'Sup, you can call me VD. I'm a college student studying to become a licensed dietician, and boy, let me just say, it's been a heck of a time parsing all the doublespeak in my textbooks and lectures. After lurking around this site and the forums for roughly 1.5 years, I've decided to formally register and join this lovely community.

    I was brought to this site ultimately by a diagnosis of PCOS. After being treated (and trying to treat myself) with CW, only to find myself even worse off, I had the fortune of reading Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma. It was his copious references to Gary Taube's Good Calories, Bad Calories that finally convinced me to give GCBC a go. I wasn't disappointed.

    I started out with Atkins and moved onto Paleo after being convinced quality of food mattered more than quantity of carbs. Unfortunately, due to some mystery foods at the dorm and the radical change from low fat to low carb (all while taking BCP and without any insulin-lowering medication like i should have been prescribed in the first place), I gained 35 pounds in 5 months.

    I've lost 15 of those pounds in one year, and I intend to lose 15 more. However, I've been unconsciously segueing into a maintenance mode. My main issues are that my eating patterns are somewhat erratic while at school, and that my exercise is inconsistent.

    My extra-paleo interests include japanese comics, fiction writing, and learning foreign languages. I'm interested in getting to know y'all!

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    FergalJennings's Avatar
    FergalJennings is offline Senior Member
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    Hey and welcome! That's some great gains with the weight loss!

  3. #3
    strom's Avatar
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    What was the omnivore dilemma about? What type of doublespeak is there in the nutrition books?

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    elorajade is offline Senior Member
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    This way of eating will definately help with the PCOS, many women here have hormonal imbalances of some sort and they get straightened out. Don't be afraid to ask questions here, its an awesome, very informative forum.

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    ikaika is offline Senior Member
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    Welcome to the forum.


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    voodoo-anarchy's Avatar
    voodoo-anarchy is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by strom View Post
    What was the omnivore dilemma about? What type of doublespeak is there in the nutrition books?
    The Omnivore's Dilemma is a book that analyzes the way earlier generations (i.e. grandparents) used to eat, compared to the way we do now. The ultimate conclusion: if your grandmother didn't eat it, you shouldn't eat it either. Pollan wrote that Taube's information was very compelling, but decided to take a WAPF/whole foods approach.

    The nutrition books spew CW: don't eat cholesterol to lower blood lipids, carbs should be 60% of total macronutrient intake, enjoy everything "in moderation" lest you break out in orthorexia. Ketosis = death. Beans = Best. Fiber = Fantastic. (you get the drift...)

    They are coming a little up to date with the omega-3, but the best they recommend is fatty fish and canola oil. It IS the ADA standard that I'm learning, after all... But the ADA doesn't approve much of vegan/vegetarian diets either (mainly because of B12 and iron), which makes me feel a little relieved. And I think most practicing dieticians are looking at a more moderate approach to treating metabolic syndrome nowadays.

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    voodoo-anarchy's Avatar
    voodoo-anarchy is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for the welcome, everyone! Hope to see you around

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    Khrystyna's Avatar
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    Hi there and welcome! It's cool to see another trainee here, I just finished my four years of nutritional science in Ireland! Are you far along with the course? I'm contimplating doing the Ma to become a dietician here (we have 2 seperate qualifications in Ireland) how do you find it?
    My primal adventures:
    http://foodfloraandfelines.blogspot.com/
    Cooking, nutrition, gardening, foraging, preserving, photography

  9. #9
    voodoo-anarchy's Avatar
    voodoo-anarchy is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Khrystyna View Post
    Hi there and welcome! It's cool to see another trainee here, I just finished my four years of nutritional science in Ireland! Are you far along with the course? I'm contimplating doing the Ma to become a dietician here (we have 2 seperate qualifications in Ireland) how do you find it?
    Thanks for the welcome, Khrystyna! It's so cool to meet someone else studying nutrition on this board! We primal nutrition students have to stick together

    I'm not that far along in my courses, actually. I just finished the basic chemistry/biology groundwork, a lot of which I learned about previously (insulin, glucagon, vitamins) so my studies have been pretty lax so far. I'm actually only allowed to take a certain number of classes related to Nutrition per semester, so I've had to "pace" myself by padding my schedule with nonmajor courses. I hear they do things differently in Europe--that the college system is only three years long and that they're pretty intensive.

    If you don't get the qualification for RD/LD, what are you planning on doing? Are you going to get a Ph.D? What kind of options are there for graduates with a degree in nutritional sciences? My school has two programs for becoming a dietician, and getting a degree in nutritional sciences is completely separate from that option, so I'm curious to know how things are different.

  10. #10
    Khrystyna's Avatar
    Khrystyna is offline Senior Member
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    He he we sure do! In Ireland and a lot of Europe you can either be a registered dietician or general nutritionist, a hospital here wouldn't usually hire a nutritionist to work on the wards but would use a dietician but as a nutritionist you are allowed to work in preventative nutrition, admin etc although my course was largely geared towards the research and public health side of things. I could go and do another 18months to become a dietician but I don't particularly want to work in a hopsital anyway and there's no work here in it. Although if I were to go to the states or certain parts of Europe my qualification would be viewed largely the same as a dieticians, it's all very confusing lol. In Ireland you do four years for nutritional science, and it's extremely intensive, up to 40 hours per week with labs work and the likes. I'm exhausted after it, it was totally nuts! I got offered a research Ma that would have led to a Phd if I wanted it to but I'm not really into the research side of things so I turned it down, I want to work as a consultant eventually but I'll probably get a job in admin or technology in a food company in the mean time to earn some cash first.
    My primal adventures:
    http://foodfloraandfelines.blogspot.com/
    Cooking, nutrition, gardening, foraging, preserving, photography

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