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Thread: Food that Really Schmecks page

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    Pamela M's Avatar
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    Food that Really Schmecks

    Primal Fuel
    Dandelion Salad
    Spinach and Broth
    Rabbit Pie
    Pickled Beef Tongue
    Liver in Sour Cream
    Green Tomato Mincemeat

    Recipes out of the latest Paleo cookbook? No. This is just a few of the treats to be found in a cookbook I received from my sis about 30 years ago (see thread title). It's written by Edna Staebler in 1968, a mennonite from an area in Ontario where I grew up.

    A recent thread on here about peaches, brought back memories of her delectable Peach Cream Pie, and a time when life, and eating, seemed simpler and just more satisfying. I've been perusing the cookbook for a few days now, and it strikes me that if we had only stuck to the truths and pure honest cooking found within these pages, a website like MDA wouldn't be necessary. We wouldn't be subjecting every little thing we ate to incessant scrutiny, questioning if it's paleo, primal, lchf, or hclf. Eating would be pure pleasure and a time to be shared after a hard days work.

    "She melts butter in a granite-ware kettle and into it pours sour-milk curds which have been scalded, crumbled and ripened for three or four days. She stirs the mass till it melts to the colour of honey, adds cream and keeps stirring till it comes to a a boil that goes "poof!" then pours it into a crock and sets it away in the pantry. "do you want to lick the dish?" She gives me a spoon and the kettle to scrape. "Some like it better with caraway seed in but we rather have it chust plain." sampling its mild mellow goodness, I agree that it couldn' be better"

    How can you not love a cookbook with little gems like that! I remember walking with my sister to a mennonite farm down the lane to get eggs. We'd gingerly step into her kitchen, which resembled more a barn in our eyes, with dirty wooden floors, jars all over the place filled with every sort of fruit and veg, not a prepackaged anything to be found, and a huge plastic tub which at the time we didn't realize, but held fermenting cabbage--all we knew was it smelled. The mennonite lady would greet us, bare feet, wiping her hands on her dirty apron, with those amazing pink cheeks. We'd take our goods and exit quickly, breathing a sigh of relief. Making our way past the chickens and the goats, little did we realize that she had it right all along.

  2. #2
    lotusberries's Avatar
    lotusberries is offline Senior Member
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    My mother has that cookbook! She has used it my whole life. So awesome, lol!

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    Pamela M's Avatar
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    That is so cool! My book is so used--you can easily tell which recipes I loved by the amount of leftovers on the page. Some pages are barely decipherable!

    But really, it's been an eye opener reading this book. Another excerpt about waste/fat:

    "In Bevvy's and my house nothing is wasted. Leftover meats are jellied, pickled, warmed over, or combined with vegetables and noodles to make nourishing suppers. From Bevvy I have learned that hot gravy is delicious on bread; beef dripping makes the best flavoured shortening for frying potatoes, onions, wieners or steak; chicken fat, pure and mild, gives cookies a delicate crispness; bacon dripping is the preferred base for warm sour-cream salads. And goose grease we use for rubbing on sore throats and chests when the children have colds," Bevvy tells me. "Or for waterproofing their boots. And whatever fat we have that we can't use any other way yet, we pour in a kettle with lye and make soap."

    So simple.

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    sbhikes's Avatar
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    Schmecks? That doesn't sound good. The food sounds good though.

    My own grandmother, born in 1915 I think, put butter and cream in everything. Well, margarine, but the cream was real.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
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    picklepete's Avatar
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    Ya, a determined industry has done a great job demolishing food culture. Cookbooks published in the 50s and 60s became heavily branded, e.g. first ingredient is one box of KraftNabiscoDuncanCrocker magic mix.

    My age-peers are all neurotic about weight and cholesterol stats but never learned how to dice an onion--the "serious" dieters will live on quinoa brown rice snacky crisps from Whole Foods. (The unlabeled bones, pickles, and lard found in my kitchen make me a total eccentric)
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    Pamela M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Schmecks? That doesn't sound good. The food sounds good though.

    My own grandmother, born in 1915 I think, put butter and cream in everything. Well, margarine, but the cream was real.
    Hahaha.. It does kind of sound strange, but in Mennonite language it means yummy. And everything they ate was either provided by their farm or fellow mennonites. Cream and butter were in abundance....straight from the cow peaking it's head in the door. They got a lot of flack in the day, and still do for what we westernized folk deem rather unorthodox ways--no electricity, bathing maybe once a week, horse and buggy transportation...the list goes on. STrange thing is, they live a way many of us now strive to return to. Difference is, they never left.

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    Pamela M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by picklepete View Post
    Ya, a determined industry has done a great job demolishing food culture. Cookbooks published in the 50s and 60s became heavily branded, e.g. first ingredient is one box of KraftNabiscoDuncanCrocker magic mix.

    My age-peers are all neurotic about weight and cholesterol stats but never learned how to dice an onion--the "serious" dieters will live on quinoa brown rice snacky crisps from Whole Foods. (The unlabeled bones, pickles, and lard found in my kitchen make me a total eccentric)
    We could be friends! I always get lard at the 'Groeneweg', a bio butcher in the neighbourhood. Sometimes I render it myself, but they also provide it ready to go. It's pretty funny how our kitchens begin to resemble science experiments. But I love it. There's real satisfaction found in a jar of self-made pickles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pamela M View Post
    Dandelion Salad
    Spinach and Broth
    Rabbit Pie
    Pickled Beef Tongue
    Liver in Sour Cream
    Green Tomato Mincemeat

    Recipes out of the latest Paleo cookbook? No. This is just a few of the treats to be found in a cookbook I received from my sis about 30 years ago (see thread title). It's written by Edna Staebler in 1968, a mennonite from an area in Ontario where I grew up.

    A recent thread on here about peaches, brought back memories of her delectable Peach Cream Pie, and a time when life, and eating, seemed simpler and just more satisfying. I've been perusing the cookbook for a few days now, and it strikes me that if we had only stuck to the truths and pure honest cooking found within these pages, a website like MDA wouldn't be necessary. We wouldn't be subjecting every little thing we ate to incessant scrutiny, questioning if it's paleo, primal, lchf, or hclf. Eating would be pure pleasure and a time to be shared after a hard days work. g.
    I was reading recently about the French paradox...of how the French eat lots of butter and rich fatty meats and sauces with plenty of carbs and wine and generally stay slim and healthy. They eat good rich satisfying meals of whole foods and rarely snack in between. They take at least an hour to sit down and really enjoy every meal. My guess is they eat to appetite as their meals are so satisfying that they have no problem stopping when they are full. Apparently when they come to the uk they are shocked by all the chocolate bars and other snacks on sale everywhere as it wouldn't occur to them to snack.
    Last edited by Jenster7; 07-07-2014 at 01:10 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenster7 View Post
    I was reading recently about the French paradox...of how the French eat lots of butter and rich fatty meats and sauces with plenty of carbs and wine and generally stay slim and healthy. They eat good rich satisfying meals of whole foods and rarely snack in between. They take at least an hour to sit down and really enjoy every meal. My guess is they eat to appetite as their meals are so satisfying that they have no problem stopping when they are full. Apparently when they come to the uk they are shocked by all the chocolate bars and other snacks on sale everywhere as it wouldn't occur to them to snack.
    That was pretty much how it was: barely any breakfast (coffee only, sometimes with a small croissant or piece of baguette with butter - mmm grass fed butter from Normandie ... sorry, I digress), 2 hour lunch break with a green salad, some starch (tubers), some animal protein and fat, a piece of raw milk cheese - maybe some fruit, then dinner would be a variation of the same combo. Nothing in between, that was only for school kids ("le goûter" or 4pm snack). But today, how sad it has become in busy urban areas...

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    Wildrose's Avatar
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    Please tell me where to get this cookbook.

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