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Thread: At what level do you consider yourself an athlete? page

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    amyb's Avatar
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    At what level do you consider yourself an athlete?

    Primal Fuel
    I am wondering what plan I should really be following and if I should be eating more for my exercise or if I can maintain on a simply primal diet with no modifications? I guess I don't know at what level one considers themselves an athlete? I'm athletic but I'm in no means training for a race. I don't like racing, I'd rather be on a trail by myself any other day for free...ok I'm off my soap box.

    Anyway, I exercise daily moderately for about an hour in the mornings...don't go too hard elliptical or sprints/spin class. It's more of a mind clearing start to my day than a real hard workout. I go for mtn bike rides or hikes in the afternoon both also around 2 hours usually maybe a couple times a week in addition to the morning workouts. Weight lift and do core work at least once a week, usually twice but I hate weight lifting...I really do.

    I'm either going for long hikes or long day mountain bikes rides on the weekends, backpacking or climbing...just depends on whatever adventure I have planned. I'm in Colorado..there's a lot.

    Do I follow a diet for athletes? I do find that I have trouble really starting my bike rides...I feel as though I weigh a million pounds, my muscles warm up and I'm good to go for the rest of the day but the initial start is brutal. I typically drink some coconut water before rides, I find that helps. Anyone else experiences this?

    Finally, when should I eat any type of carb and what counts? Am I only going to get the benefits if I eat sweet potato or actual potato or rice starch (which I have to be on the FODMAP diet right now for IBS and celiac) so I can't really have that. I can eat certain fruits and vegetables. Will veggies count as my starch or no? I can have parsnips? Thoughts? Thanks everyone!

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    Neckhammer's Avatar
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    Not the answer you are looking for but they need to rename that book. IMO you are only an athlete if you are regularly competing against others in a given sport. Otherwise you are indeed a trainee or working out or playing or whatever else. I would say one hour a day of training is enough to be a consideration in your nutritional programming though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Not the answer you are looking for but they need to rename that book. IMO you are only an athlete if you are regularly competing against others in a given sport. Otherwise you are indeed a trainee or working out or playing or whatever else. I would say one hour a day of training is enough to be a consideration in your nutritional programming though.
    I got up off the sofa last night to change the channel on the TV because the battery on the remote gave out. Does that count?

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    Srsly,

    I think you simply need to look at the Primal Carbohydrate Curve and dial it up and and down with the carbs that suit you until you find what works for you.

    How many carbs should I eat each day? | Mark's Daily Apple

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    I think that it is all about the caloric demands of what you are doing, more so than a set time of working out. The diet should be adjusted for whatever one's activity level, but an "athlete level" is usually in another echelon.

    In looking at what you listed, none of that is really what I would call "training". My definition of an athlete is pretty straight-forward: A person is an athlete when they are training with a highly specific regimen, at high volume, and that this training occurs regardless of how they feel on a given day. It is 100% performance driven. How they look doesn't matter, their BF% doesn't matter, it is only about being as good as possible at a given sport.

    Ex: I have only "trained" for specific things in my life in short bursts....for football, triathlon, and Strongman competitions. In all 3 of these, I was hitting the weight room/road/pool on a set schedule at high volume. Feel like hell? Hit weights anyway. Ears infected from living in the pool? Swim the laps anyway....it is not a fun time. My body was in a nearly constant state of repair, with caloric demands that HAD to be hit, otherwise I would not get stronger or faster. I ate a ton, often to where I was not remotely hungry, because the training schedule required maximal repair and muscle gain.

    So if you can allow yourself to be hypocaloric for a few days without it being the end of the world (I.E. your gains will stop), I would not be deliberately trying to eat more (an "athlete" diet).

    Hope this helps
    Last edited by TheyCallMeLazarus; 06-24-2014 at 11:40 AM.
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    amyb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheyCallMeLazarus View Post
    I think that it is all about the caloric demands of what you are doing, more so than a set time of working out. The diet should be adjusted for whatever one's activity level, but an "athlete level" is usually in another echelon.

    In looking at what you listed, none of that is really what I would call "training". My definition of an athlete is pretty straight-forward: A person is an athlete when they are training with a highly specific regimen, at high volume, and that this training occurs regardless of how they feel on a given day. It is 100% performance driven. How they look doesn't matter, their BF% doesn't matter, it is only about being as good as possible at a given sport.

    Ex: I have only "trained" for specific things in my life in short bursts....for football, triathlon, and Strongman competitions. In all 3 of these, I was hitting the weight room/road/pool on a set schedule at high volume. Feel like hell? Hit weights anyway. Ears infected from living in the pool? Swim the laps anyway....it is not a fun time. My body was in a nearly constant state of repair, with caloric demands that HAD to be hit, otherwise I would not get stronger or faster. I ate a ton, often to where I was not remotely hungry, because the training schedule required maximal repair and muscle gain.

    So if you can allow yourself to be hypocaloric for a few days without it being the end of the world (I.E. your gains will stop), I would not be deliberately trying to eat more (an "athlete" diet).

    Hope this helps
    That is actually Really helpful! I figured as much that I didn't need to supplement or increase intake. Thanks so much!

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