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    GaTo's Avatar
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    So what are the "lesser wanted meats" to ask the butcher for?

    Primal Fuel
    So I went to my local Whole Foods market today to pick up a couple of pounds of Ground Beef. When I got there I met one of the butchers (its a female so is it butcheress?) who was very nice. All they were selling today was 95% Grass fed lean beef. Bleh wheres the flavor? I asked if she had any 80/20 and she didn't because they usually dont sell it that fatty so they order a limited supply. Well she was kind enough to take the 95% and mix in some fatty trimmings from the ribeye they cut up earlier so it would up the fat content of the meat...

    We worked out an agreement for her to save me the fatty extras of meat and what not... My question is what should I be asking her for that would be most cost effective for me? I've asked for pork bellys to begin with but I don't know what the "lesser wanted" meats are. And when I say this i mean the cuts that aren't usually sold in the display window. Any suggestions?

    thanks in advance
    Last edited by GaTo; 07-03-2010 at 08:17 PM. Reason: messed up the title

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    anyone?

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    The various pot roast chunks, possibly skirt or flank steak.
    "No fate but what we make"- Sarah Connor, Terminator 2
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
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    Shoulder of lamb has plenty of fat and plenty of flavour to go with it.

    I used to buy a whole shoulder, bone it and trim off all the fat. The fat would go in the oven on high heat for around half an hour to rend. Discard the solid bits. Then I would mix the cubed meat in with the fat and bake in the oven until well browned. Finally, I would make a gravy with the pan juices including all of the fat, pepper, a bit of salt and some rosemary. Put it all into a casserole dish and bake, covered, for an hour or more. Never have I had more flavourful lamb and the gravy was wicked.

    Unfortunately the gravy was wicked because of the flour. Next weekend, I'm going to try the following variation. Mince a few onions and cloves of garlic in the food processor then add to a saucepan with some of the lamb fat. Fry slowly, stirring until the onions are well cooked and the fat separates (this is the standard way to make the base of Thai and Burmese curries). Add to the casserole with the remaining ingredients. This should produce a thick gravy that is 100% primal

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    Yesterday the WF butcher made my wife and me some 80/20 yesterday and dropped the price to $3.49/lb. That 95/5 is pretty tasteless and does not make good burgers.

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    GaTo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by naiadknight View Post
    The various pot roast chunks, possibly skirt or flank steak.
    thanks for the heads up but where i'm from, skirt steak tends to be a little pricier and i'm trying to save a couple bucks

    Quote Originally Posted by peril View Post
    Shoulder of lamb has plenty of fat and plenty of flavour to go with it.

    I used to buy a whole shoulder, bone it and trim off all the fat. The fat would go in the oven on high heat for around half an hour to rend. Discard the solid bits. Then I would mix the cubed meat in with the fat and bake in the oven until well browned. Finally, I would make a gravy with the pan juices including all of the fat, pepper, a bit of salt and some rosemary. Put it all into a casserole dish and bake, covered, for an hour or more. Never have I had more flavourful lamb and the gravy was wicked.

    Unfortunately the gravy was wicked because of the flour. Next weekend, I'm going to try the following variation. Mince a few onions and cloves of garlic in the food processor then add to a saucepan with some of the lamb fat. Fry slowly, stirring until the onions are well cooked and the fat separates (this is the standard way to make the base of Thai and Burmese curries). Add to the casserole with the remaining ingredients. This should produce a thick gravy that is 100% primal
    my friend that sounds amazing.. what temps are you cooking at?

    Quote Originally Posted by h2gasser View Post
    Yesterday the WF butcher made my wife and me some 80/20 yesterday and dropped the price to $3.49/lb. That 95/5 is pretty tasteless and does not make good burgers.
    SWEET! That's exactly what i did and i noticed that the price went down as well. Where are you located? This can't be the same WF.

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    peril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaTo View Post
    my friend that sounds amazing.. what temps are you cooking at?
    The fat can be rendered in a hot oven say 200C (~400F). Casserole should be baked at around 170C (~350F)

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    It's so sad to me that most cuts of meat have the fat trimmed off. I think the only way to get all the fat is to invest in a 1/4 cow direct from the farm and have the butcher leave all the fat intact. Getting beef fat to render into tallow might be another cost effective way to add the fat back in.

    Pork belly braised is one of the yummiest foods I've ever eaten.

    That lamb dish sounds delish. The only thing I think should be mentioned is that primal people definitely used the bones in their meat. If you want to cut it out in a particular dish, it would be great to make a broth out of it to add to other things. I have all sorts of broths in ice cube trays to add anywhere I can. Bones provide tons of minerals, marrow, and gelatin which is great for healing the intestines. Also makes meat on the bone seems more cost effective if you make sure to use the whole thing.

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