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Thread: Anemia, hypothyroid, and high cholesterol! Please help! page

  1. #1
    Beauty's Avatar
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    Anemia, hypothyroid, and high cholesterol! Please help!

    Primal Fuel
    Hey guys!

    I am exhausted! I'm wondering if you've got some insight. I got some blood test results back which look like they require further tests. Here are the results which are out of range:

    Thyroid:
    S-T3-V (FT3) 3.4 pmol/l (3.5-6.5)
    P-TSH 1.86 mU/l (0.3-4.2)
    P-T4-V 13 pmol/l (9-20)
    30/03/2010: Thyroid peroxidase antibody level POSITIVE 43Gd.00

    Blood:
    B-Leuk 3.5 E9/l (3.4-8.2)*
    B-Eryt 3.9 E12/l (3.9-5.2)
    B-Hb 115 g/l (117-155)
    E-MCHC 319 (320-363)

    *This has gone down from 5.5 in Aug.08. Still just in normal range, but it's interesting because it might indicate the type of anemia I have.

    Lipids:
    P-Kol (I think this means total cholesterol) 6.0 mmol/l (<5)
    P-LDL lask 3.6 mmol/l (<3)
    fP-Trigly 0.4 mmol/l (0.5-2.6)

    So, it looks like I'm hypothyroid, I have anemia, and I have high cholesterol. I'll be seeing my doctor about these results next week, but I have a few questions from the wise and informed people on this forum:

    What kind of anemia might I have?
    Is my high cholesterol linked to hypothyroidism?
    Is my anemia linked to hypothyroidism?
    I'm breastfeeding and I lift weights. Am I making the anemia worse?
    What's up with the low triglycerides? Is it a problem???
    Last edited by Beauty; 07-02-2010 at 07:31 AM.

  2. #2
    emmie's Avatar
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    Hypothyroid notoriously elevates cholesterol, so don't let your doctor deal with that in any way until you're properly medicated with thyroid hormones for a few months at least.

    Your T3 is so low that it's no wonder you're fatigued. Make sure that your doctor addresses that because your TSH and T4 numbers are not bad, and many doctors assume that is all that's necessary. You might want to suggest a reverseT3 test because with your normal T4 numbers and the low T3, it may be that you're converting T4 to reverse T3 (T4 normally converts to T3 in the body). If that's the case, your doctor should give you ONLY T3 meds (Cytomel) and no T4 at all. That will balance your hormones, and you'll feel a lot better.

    Low trigs are good--the lower the better.

    I'm not sure about the anemia, but the thyroid seems to influence almost everything in the body, so I wouldn't be surprised. Most likely, you just need some supplemental iron.

    Good luck with all this!

  3. #3
    Beauty's Avatar
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    Thanks, Emmie!

    Yeah, I think Monday I will march myself straight to the lab for an RT3 test. I see the doc on Thursday. Having read Kharrazian's book, I'm weary of taking T4s if I don't need them.

    As for the iron, I was warned by a doc in the US to find out the type of the anemia before supplementing with iron, since if I have trouble absorbing iron, then it can build up in tissues and cause all kinds of problems.

    Glad about the trigs.

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    most of the results I don't understand do to differences in the units used. Do you have reference ranges?

    It could be iron deficiency anemia, but it could be others a well (we wouldn't know without ferrin). It could also be another form entirely or a combination of forms. I'd want to see a more thorough blood panel for you hct, serum iron or ferritin etc

    so the MCHC:
    http://www.labtestsonline.org/unders.../cbc/test.html
    "Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) is a calculation of the average concentration of hemoglobin inside a red cell. Decreased MCHC values (hypochromia) are seen in conditions where the hemoglobin is abnormally diluted inside the red cells, such as in iron deficiency anemia and in thalassemia. Increased MCHC values (hyperchromia) are seen in conditions where the hemoglobin is abnormally concentrated inside the red cells, such as in burn patients and hereditary spherocytosis, a relatively rare congenital disorder. "

    I have thalessemia (the most minor of the minor forms) and it's not uncommon. Do you have any mediterranean ancestry?

    How much red meat do you eat? Multi with iron? How much B6? Folate? Probably worth tracking them for awhile but i'd *really* want to see, again, a more thorough blood panel.

    If you can scan in results so I can see reference ranges, it'd be helpful.

    Also, I'm of the school that thinks your TSH is still too high and should be just under 1.



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    Hi cillakat,

    Thanks for you input!

    I put the reference ranges in parentheses beside my results. My doc wanted me to have these tests done before the more in-depth blood panel.

    What do you think about breastfeeding and weight lifting while anemic? The latter has been becoming more difficult. The breastfeeding literally feels draining. My boy is 2.5 yrs old... so we're working on decreasing it... tips?

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    Oh yeah, forgot to answer, no mediterranean ancestry. I'm of Irish/ English/ Scottish/ French / German ancestry. :-)

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    You have antibodies that say you have Autoimmune Thyroid Disease. Your TSH is not bad , though most feel better around 1 or lower. Your T4 is not quite midrange and your T3 is low out of range.

    With your T4 and T3 in different places in their respective range, it suggests a conversion problem. The question is why. Is it because of the antobodies and autoimmune reaction? Or is it something else, like diet. Are you eating less than 50 grams of carbs a day? If so, eating more carbs might raise your T3 naturally and also lower your TSH.

    I think getting ferritin (iron stores) tested would be a good idea.

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    marcadav, thanks for thoughts...

    Yes, I also think I have a conversion problem. It's exactly what I told my doctor. I had low T3s before I changed my diet to grain free in December (prior to that it was gluten free). I've kept my carbs under 100 since around February, and for the past month, they've been hovering between 35-60. My carbs are this low because my very sensitive digestive system can't tolerate fruit, nuts, potatoes, or sweet potatoes. I'd probably be good with squash, but I can't seem to find ANY here in Finland.

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