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Thread: sugar shock and guilty feelings page

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    jilly's Avatar
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    sugar shock and guilty feelings

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    Someone on this forum wrote a post about feeling guilty after eating something unhealthy, and I wanted to share some thoughts and see what experiences everyone else has had on this topic. I've recently lost about 20 lbs in a couple months by cutting out sugar and eating lots of healthy fats, eggs, yogurt, small amount of red meat, etc. I guess I didn't realize how good I felt until my husband and I went away for the weekend and I decided to have 2 cheat days. I wouldn't say I ate a lot, but what I did eat was decadent and delicious. Mentally, I don't regret one bite. It was all amazing food that I haven't had in months and I decided it was time for me to have a tiny splurge. But physically, my body was like, WTF?!?!?! I was bloaty, lethargic, achy, crampy.... all the bad things that come with overindulging. Basically the feelings after Thanksgiving meals lol and I wondered if it was worth it to give myself a mental break from really clean eating to have all these foods when they made me feel so awful. Like I said, mentally, I felt no guilt. But my body was like hey lady, let's not eat so much cake, okay? Does anyone else do really good on clean eating and then splurge and feel physically awful for a few days? I think it might be a while before I splurge again, I've just gotten so used to not eating sugar that it's getting hard to justify eating it when it makes me feel so gross.

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    For DH and I we have noticed that if we do splurge for 1 day then it's fine, body handles it well and we get back into the swing of things easily.. If we go two days or more, then body feels like it's been hit my a Mack truck. So now if we do splurge then it's a meal or two (hard to break the IF routine even when splurging) and then get back to clean eating the following day
    I don't believe there is one correct way of eating for everybody, and I don't believe there is one correct way of eating for a person through every stage of their life

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    Could just be a different baseline for comparison. I was accustomed to inevitable daily reflux before I pegged the wheat.
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    Interesting reactions. I do think that after eating clean for a while I have become much more in tune with my body and how it responds to what I feed it. I'm not sure whether the reactions are indeed more intense or whether they just went unnoticed before, maybe a bit of both.

    I think it's fine to splurge sometimes on a real treat and enjoy it, like you did. Maybe you will find that a smaller amount will actually be more indulgent and enjoyable than a larger amount? I'm fine with being "spoiled" for junk products (they hold no appeal now) but some beautiful fresh home baking can still occasionally be one of life's small pleasures.

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    I've found over time that each "cheat meal" or each "cheat day" is different. The first couple whole cheat days or weekends didn't make me feel too bad, but now eating anything too far out of the realm of primal give me abundant reactions. I think the reactions have helped me understand the mental temptations I face and helped me slowly get better at avoiding them. If my friends are having pizza hungover on Sunday, I know I will feel terrible at work on Monday and can remember vividly how that feels, so now instead of indulging with them, I'll get a massive salad I wouldn't normally get and let myself have cheese or other toppings that aren't too bad, but won't completely derail me. I think the whole process is trial and error.

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    I feel that splurging is natural and it's incredibly hard to stick to a 100% 'healthy diet'. I find the best thing to do is either splurge on healthier foods (for instance gorge on fruit as opposed to cake), or just allow yourself to eat bad food now and then. The worst thing you can do is to feel guilty and punish yourself.
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    Sometimes I have horrible reactions, other times, not so much. My body knows I go in waves of healthy/unhealthy eating. The worst is when I'm off dairy and then have a lot at once unwittingly (mac and cheese).

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    Quote Originally Posted by amonkey View Post
    the worst thing you can do is to feel guilty and punish yourself.

    qft
    I don't believe there is one correct way of eating for everybody, and I don't believe there is one correct way of eating for a person through every stage of their life

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    This is apropos since I just finished an absolutely delicious no-bake cookie. I am fine with letting myself splurge on occasion, but I am careful to make sure that it stays on occasion and not something I do all the time. For instance, I let myself have a single Cadbury Creme Egg this Easter season. Terrible for you, but I love them. So instead of denying myself any at all and sulking, I opted to savor one without guilt and then go back to eating stuff that's good fuel.

    On the other hand, there's definitely something to be said for reevaulating what constitutes a treat. Since we only want grass fed beef (thank you, Food, Inc) we haven't had a good beef roast in ages. A nice splurge (financially, not nutritionally) was to get a good local/organic/grass fed roast at the farmer's market. Now, this might not be as rare a meal for those of you with more money, but it's a treat for us.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Annieh View Post
    Interesting reactions. I do think that after eating clean for a while I have become much more in tune with my body and how it responds to what I feed it. I'm not sure whether the reactions are indeed more intense or whether they just went unnoticed before, maybe a bit of both.

    ...
    ^^^ this nails it for me. I think the guilt is not valuable, but I do try to think about triggers if I am splurging on a non-special occasion. Why do I want that treat? Particularly based on my last cookie [wheat] splurge and how truly awful I felt for 3 days afterwards, I think I shall do my best to ensure that future splurges are on something wonderful, decadent, and GF (total weakness for yummy baked goods here!).
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