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  1. #21
    kiloechoxray's Avatar
    kiloechoxray is offline Junior Member
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    I have a lot of Coyotes right behind my house. I like 'em. I'd never think of shooting them as they take care of carrion and are a natural part of the eco system. Hogs are a pest animal in Texas, currently doing 400+ million in damages per year to farms and it takes killing 1/3 of the population to make a dent in the problem. I'm really down to hunt them, especially since the meat is good.

  2. #22
    jmsmall's Avatar
    jmsmall is offline Senior Member
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    Mice are cute, too, and part of the ecosystem, but I feel very little guilt in trapping them. If coyotes are pests, they are pests. I'm not going to go up into the wild mountains to hunt them but if they were killing my stock I'd hunt them with not a moment's hesitation.
    10/2/12: 169 lbs, 37"waist
    Now: low 150's, 33" waist
    Blog: http://paleopathologist.com/

  3. #23
    eats.meats.west's Avatar
    eats.meats.west is offline Senior Member
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    My neighborhood is pretty much developed and residential and yet I can go out some nights with the dog and see a few coyote just dashing up the middle of the road. They do clear out the neighborhood cats and I always wonder what people are thinking when they post the lost cat reward signs not realizing that they helped feed the Coyotes. My dog is a 65lb wuss but the Coyotes will stay away from him.

    No guns here, but if I had one I'd save the bullets for human predators.

  4. #24
    Diana Renata's Avatar
    Diana Renata is offline Senior Member
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    If it helps at all, I have eaten coyote and it can be quite good! I had a blog post about it, but my site crashed and I'm working on putting everything back together. There ARE recipes out there, however if you are one of those people who are sensitive to the taste of wild meats, you probably won't like it.

    Alternately, I'd be happy to give you my address if you don't mind freezing and overnighting the carcass to me. (Not really joking- lol)

  5. #25
    CE402's Avatar
    CE402 is offline Senior Member
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    I've been a few times, never managed to get clean shot on one though. They are crafty.

    To everyone that is concerned about the ethics of coyote population control, they are invasive in many parts of the country. They were rarely seen in the eastern US until they grey wolf was pushed out. They can also reproduce very quickly, with litter sizes of up to 19 pups and reach maturity in 12-18 months. Coupled with a long life span, up to 14 years in the wild, they have thrived in the presence of man.

    Since man is responsible for eliminating the selection pressure that kept their population in check, it behooves us as stewards of the environment to correct this balance as best we can.

    They are remarkable critters, though. Very clever and adaptable; a few years ago, one took over a Starbucks in downtown Chicago. Walked into the shop on a warm summer afternoon and cooled off in the cooler. For some reason, most of the patrons fled in terror...


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  6. #26
    TheyCallMeLazarus's Avatar
    TheyCallMeLazarus is offline Senior Member
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    @ CE I enjoyed your analysis, and it is a true one.....in my part of the country wolves ruled the forest until we pushed them out. We don't have much of a coyote problem though here. It gets far too cold, plus there are a LOT of other predators that would make the attrition rate in pups and juveniles very high.

    Ex: A friend of mine that was visiting was excited to go squirrel hunting out into my 90% oak forest that starts about a mile from my house....he assumed that it would be packed with them, seeing as it is their fav food source. I told him many times that there are ZERO squirrels in those hills, and he did not believe me.

    That is because they are instead packed with fisher cats and foxes, which are killing machines for squirrels. Haven't seen a squirrel around my property in a year. The fishers are mean as hell though

    The only point I would make is that I don't understand the idea of killing coyotes to protect livestock, on the basis that we killed the wolves, making them invasive.....this means that we would only instead be dealing with WOLVES, which are an entirely different can of worms than coyotes. My brother in Montana has constant wolf tracks around, and he says how anything you put outside, from cattle to chickens, will be dead on the first night from those killers.

    So we pushed out the real killers, and now they are replaced with second rate killers, thus we have a right to kill them too?

    I don't understand why no one is old school anymore with protecting their livestock. Get sheepdogs, keep some bulls out there with horns the width of a truck grill, and maybe little coyotes wouldn't be killing your cattle anymore....it seems really stupid to say "Oh poor me, I put 20 heifers and 3 calves all out on 150 acres of open plains, with no real fencing, sheepdog protection, or bulls to provide any defenses....and then one of them got killed!"

    I mean I only keep goats, chickens, geese, rabbits, and one cow. Not a big operation.....and I have 2 full-time sheepdogs out there to protect them. It's common sense.
    "Man is born free.....but everywhere he is in chains."

  7. #27
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    Seriously, one thing to watch in eating predators is the possibility of trichinosis. This is the muscle eating parasitic worm that used to be somewhat common in bad pork. Studies in British Columbia show that the worm, Trichinella spiralis, is pretty common in a variety of carnivores, as well as several species of rodents. Some outbreaks have been traced to bear meat.

    So if you eat coyote, cook it well!

    Doc Jim
    10/2/12: 169 lbs, 37"waist
    Now: low 150's, 33" waist
    Blog: http://paleopathologist.com/

  8. #28
    fishingirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiloechoxray View Post
    I have a lot of Coyotes right behind my house. I like 'em. I'd never think of shooting them as they take care of carrion and are a natural part of the eco system. Hogs are a pest animal in Texas, currently doing 400+ million in damages per year to farms and it takes killing 1/3 of the population to make a dent in the problem. I'm really down to hunt them, especially since the meat is good.
    Have you ever been hog hunting? My husband goes pretty regularly. We don't go with guns very often either. Fun and yes, tasty meat We hunt mostly Corpus Christi areas.

  9. #29
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    I have never been hog hunting (none in my area), but another thing I would like to do. Me and the BF have actually talked about taking a mini-vacation to TX to do just that.

    Have you ever been hog hunting? My husband goes pretty regularly. We don't go with guns very often either. Fun and yes, tasty meat We hunt mostly Corpus Christi areas.
    Bows?

  10. #30
    Egerland's Avatar
    Egerland is offline Senior Member
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    Maybe I missed it in previous posts, but one reason to hunt coyotes is for their fur. Parka hoods etc.

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