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    primalrob's Avatar
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    Are pickles primal?

    I had a major craving for some pickles this past weekend, and though "hey, it's nothing but a cucumber in some salty water." well, i checked the ingredients on the label and there are a couple of other things in there to give the brine some color and flavor. unsure, i put them back on the shelf, and decided to get a second opinion.

    so, what do you think, are pickles primal?

  2. #2
    MeatMe216's Avatar
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    if you can find a brand with natural ingredients, yes.

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    Bubbies is primal and delicious (and expensive!).

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    Molecular Grokologist's Avatar
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    I second Bubbies as a recommendation. Remember that you can take new veggies and put them in the Bubbies liquid, set them out for a while (less time if you "muddle" them to break open some of the cell walls) and have them pickled just fine by the same batch of bugs that did the work in the first place.
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    tangentrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Molecular Grokologist View Post
    I second Bubbies as a recommendation. Remember that you can take new veggies and put them in the Bubbies liquid, set them out for a while (less time if you "muddle" them to break open some of the cell walls) and have them pickled just fine by the same batch of bugs that did the work in the first place.
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    Pickles are more "Weston A. Price" than "Grok," but if you can get the good stuff that isn't pasteurized, I'd highly recommend 'em. (As others have noted, Bubbies is the biggest company selling these.)
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    Bubbies' are good, but if you can get in the habit of pickling your own veggies you'll find that it's much cheaper and much more fun.

    You can pickle pretty much any vegetable and it will naturally produce lactic acid, witch is ideal for your gut flora. Check out this guide by Nourishing Kitchen to learn how to pickle your own vegetables. It's a process similar to making sauerkraut.
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    Gator's Avatar
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    Look into a Taoist cookbook. They think that pickles are an important part of life, especially for older folk who , the claim is, produce less digestive acids. Can't say anything about that one way or another, but I pickle vegetables, fruits, eggs, and sometimes meat (at least it is 'vinegared')

    Your sample jar may have had poisons in it but not all pickles are that way. Also, it is easy to make pickles---from Kosher dill to KimChee and sauerkraut.

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    Just thought that my comment about pickling meat might throw some people so I got a sample recipe from the internet.

    Use a large enamel cooking pot, or any pot that is non-reactive (don't use aluminum).

    2 lbs of pork cut into 1- or 2-inch pieces (I like the ham best)
    1 Qt white vinegar (cider vinegar will change the flavor)
    1/2 cup mustard seeds
    1 Tsp celery seed
    2 Tsp hot sauce
    1 or 2 bay leaves
    6 large cloves of garlic, peeled and cracked. Don't mash it or dice it.
    1 Tsp kosher salt (regular table salt won't do)
    12 peppercorns
    Combine all ingredients except the meat in your pot. Being to the boil over high heat and boil for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside to cool.

    When the pickle liquid is cooled to room temperature, add the meat. Stir well, cover, and set the pot in your refrigerator or put it all into a large food container of plastic first. Keep the container in the refrigerator for three days to allow the pickling process to progress and enjoy your pickle meat.

    This meat can also be preserved further by the canning process with glass jars and a pressure cooker..

  10. #10
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    If you think Pickles are not primal, then read about Mammoth extinctions.
    People were eating pickled mammoths all through the arctic winters. I am not sure if anything can be more Grok like.

    It does depend on what is in the pickle, but you do want a lot of bacteria in it. That is the whole point of the pickle.

    A recipe that I am using these days to help my stomach is as follows. It is called Kaanji. Without the Vada (fried lentil balls).

    Boil some water and add some root vegetables, like Carrot, radish, beetroot etc, cut into thick strips, for a few minutes. This will kill anything that is there inside.
    Grind about a tbsp of small mustard seeds (also called rai in hindi).
    Put the water, mustard powder, and salt to taste in a large glass container.
    Mustard seeds provide the base starter for the fermentation.
    Pour some mustard oil at the top. Mustard Oil is anti-fungal and anti-bacterial. This makes sure that you don't get unwanted bacteria or fungii.
    You can add some turmeric for color.

    Cover with a cloth, and put it in the sun for a couple of hours everyday, or maybe whole day if sun is not very bright.

    In 3-4 days it will be sour and ready. Finish it within a week.
    When it gets too sour bacteria die :-(.
    Last edited by Anand Srivastava; 06-29-2010 at 01:48 AM.

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