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    Hogthow's Avatar
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    When does the internal debate stop?

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    Long story short I have carried an extra 50 pounds for about 10 years and have a serious sugar addiction. After yo-yo'ing a few times I am determined to make a long lasting change. To start I am on the 21 day primal challenge and 4 days in its going well.

    The question is though, when does the internal debate stop. That battle in your head when you walk past a ben and jerry's? It is pretty relentless for me but obviously easier to cope with when I am not hungry, tired, or stressed.

    Is it simply a matter of preparation and should I expect to always have that internal debate?

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    Drumroll's Avatar
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    For me, it stopped when I knew I was "fat-adapted." Craving for between-meal snacks stopped. Desserts sort of lost their appeal aside from very occasionally... So, yeah. It won't last forever as long as you can stick with it.

    But... As for how long... Sorry man, can't tell you. Everyone has a different metabolism, different nutritional needs, etc. this will, without a doubt, mean that everyone will take a different amount of time to fully adjust. Some people will do it over a few days, some people in a month, others will take several months. It all just takes time. Just breathe deep and hang in there! It'll get better at SOME point.
    "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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    Took about 3-5 months for me.

    After a year it's just habit. It would never even occur to me to buy bread or soda now. I think the urge people fight mostly just comes down to sugar addiction.

    But I think it's sort of like being an alcoholic; for life there will still be a little voice saying "just have a small ice cream". But of course that will turn into a month long binge. Because sugar is addictive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KimchiNinja View Post
    But I think it's sort of like being an alcoholic; for life there will still be a little voice saying "just have a small ice cream". But of course that will turn into a month long binge. Because sugar is addictive.
    I think that's (hopefully) a big step for me this time. I've admitted to myself that after 10 years of trying I can't do ice cream, cakes, and other things in moderation. It always leads to a downward spiral.

    I feel silly and disrespectful to people with real chemical addictions but I have to admit to myself that I am an addict (which is comforting and helpful to admit).

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    not on the rug's Avatar
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    I think it varies from person to person really. For someone who has weight to lose or isn't active, being ultra strict is probably required in order to achieve the weight loss goal. But perhaps enjoy that ben and jerrys or other high quality ice cream once a month. Who knows, you might not even like it anymore.

    personally, during the warmer months I include high quality ice cream once or twice weekly. Only quality stuff though. No hfcs, no gluten, just as natural as possible. Then again, I didn't start eating paleo for weight loss reasons, and on top of that, I'm a very active person. I often use a giant ice cream as my post 15 mile mountain bike ride or a post workout meal.

    You'll find your sweet spot. Just know this: you are smarter than ice cream. You are stronger willed than cake. If you think about it in those terms, it's actually quite humorous and easy to stay healthy. So...don't get outwitted by pizza. Good luck
    Last edited by not on the rug; 03-09-2014 at 05:37 PM.
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    For me, there were lots of internal debates, and each one stopped in its own time.

    Once I finally understood that wheat is my worst dietary enemy (it triggers cravings to eat more, worse than even sugar does), walking past bread, pasta, cakes, pies, etc. got really easy. I'd get an occasional tickle of desire for it, but remind myself, "That's not food. That's poison for you." Because it is.

    A lot of my favorite "bad" foods contain other objectionable ingredients that I was determined not to eat. So instead of telling myself, "I can't eat [favorite treat]," I'd look at the ingredient list when I felt tempted to buy it. Usually, corn syrup, seed oils, hydrogenated fats, soy, or grains would turn up among the ingredients.

    Focusing on "I'm not eating that specific ingredient, because I know it's really bad for me," and having a clear reason why, removes all the emotional baggage from the decision. "I can't eat [favorite food]" feels like deprivation, and makes me want it more. "It has [shit ingredient] in it, and I don't want to eat that" bypasses the emotional associations I have with certain foods. I have no warm fuzzy feelings toward high fructose corn syrup. Soybean oil brings up no fond memories. Hydrolized vegetable protein? Fuck you, man. I can refuse these things with no hesitation or regret at all. So when tempted, I read the ingredients, looking for something to reject, and there's almost always something.

    I can still overdo nuts, dark chocolate, and dried fruits (especially figs and dates), but not to the same degree I did with the highly processed foods I used to crave. But these days, I find myself constantly amazed at how much stuff gets sold as food that, in my mind, isn't properly food at all. Oh, sure, you can eat it, digest it, and crap it out, and it's not going to kill you immediately, but it's not really food. And, having shunted so many things I used to crave off into the category of "not-food," there's not a whole lot left to tempt me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by not on the rug View Post
    You'll find your sweet spot. Just know this: you are smarter than ice cream. You are stronger willed than cake. If you think about it in those terms, it's actually quite humerous and easy to stay healthy. So...don't get outwitted by pizza. Good luck
    I lol'd.

    But I also disagree. I put a cake on the counter once to see which one of us would give in and leave first, and that fucker was stubborn. Didn't move an inch.
    I got 99 problems but a pancake ain't one...

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    I suppose it is different for everyone. I find a high protein breakfast really helps.

    Of course, then you swap internal debates. The one I have now is between being a big strong girl and being a weak skinny girl (which I'm supposed to want and still berate myself for not being sometimes, but then I think how silly, it's better to be big and strong and back and forth the debate inside me goes.)
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