Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: So much contradiction for endurance runners... page 2

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Naperville, Illinois
    Posts
    306
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Oh, this was a podcast? I only read the books. Cant explain what you apparently heard.

  2. #12
    Drock's Avatar
    Drock is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    OH
    Posts
    121
    Mark's stance on this has changed a lot over the years. He used to think that you cannot be involved in endurance running/cycling/triathloning without having a diet/training regiment like the one he used in his day. If you read The Primal Blueprint and early blog posts he pretty much says this. In some of his later stuff, including a podcast from a couple of months ago, he says that it is possible to go (relatively) low-carb and not train excessively like he did, and still be competitive. He also now states that you can do it, but it's not ideal for you. You will be making some health compromises and will not be as healthy as you could be if you followed his Primal Blueprint Fitness plan of moving slowly, sprinting, and lifting heavy things.

  3. #13
    aramchek's Avatar
    aramchek is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Drock View Post
    Mark's stance on this has changed a lot over the years. He used to think that you cannot be involved in endurance running/cycling/triathloning without having a diet/training regiment like the one he used in his day. If you read The Primal Blueprint and early blog posts he pretty much says this. In some of his later stuff, including a podcast from a couple of months ago, he says that it is possible to go (relatively) low-carb and not train excessively like he did, and still be competitive. He also now states that you can do it, but it's not ideal for you. You will be making some health compromises and will not be as healthy as you could be if you followed his Primal Blueprint Fitness plan of moving slowly, sprinting, and lifting heavy things.
    This makes sense. I do think that for the mass majority of recreational runners (not elite), running at a moderate or easy pace most days of the week (which is what a high percentage of runners do most of the time) with an occasional challenging race is not decremental to your health and will definitely keep you fit (along with a proper diet, of course). This routine will certainly not cause devasting injury for most runners.

  4. #14
    accidentalpancake's Avatar
    accidentalpancake is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    520
    Quote Originally Posted by aramchek View Post
    This makes sense. I do think that for the mass majority of recreational runners (not elite), running at a moderate or easy pace most days of the week (which is what a high percentage of runners do most of the time) with an occasional challenging race is not decremental to your health and will definitely keep you fit (along with a proper diet, of course). This routine will certainly not cause devasting injury for most runners.
    I may agree with the idea that it's not going to ruin your health to practice running in this manner, but I don't know any people who call themselves "runners" that I would consider to be particularly fit. They are fit only for running purposes. Most of them are slender and skinny-fat. The only people who I know that run as a primary fitness end and are really fit are sprinters, but they spend most of their time with weights, not running.
    I got 99 problems but a pancake ain't one...

    My Journal

    Height: 6'3"
    SW (Feb 2012): 278
    SBF: 26% (Scale)
    CW (May 2014): 198
    CBF: 14.5% (Scale)
    GW: ~190-205
    GBF: ~12%

  5. #15
    Jenry Hennings's Avatar
    Jenry Hennings is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    444
    I've always held the belief that true running should always be comfortable and aerobic. I believe that's how humans are meant to cover large distances, as it's faster than walking and more efficient than running above 70% MHR.
    What mark describes is something very few runners actually put in to practise, and it's said that 80% of weekly mileage should be easy. It's an outdated method of training, which might explain why he was such a self proclaimed wreck when he retired.
    Last edited by Jenry Hennings; 03-04-2014 at 10:26 AM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Naperville, Illinois
    Posts
    306
    It's because strength training very systematically stresses and fatigues all of the muscle fiber types. It doesn't just skip ahead to the "fast twitch" and call it a day. Moving against heavy resistance and achieving deep fatigue is going to involve them all.

    The "logical" conclusion people draw is that "big" fast-twitch muscles will get in the way of endurance stuff.

    In a limited sense, that is true...one only has so much recovery in the tank. If performing objectively well at a marathon is one's goal, then one has to put in a lot of practice and acclimatizing to that kind of event. That's going to take a toll on the ability to grow muscle mass.

    On the other hand, people also vastly over-estimate just how much muscle they will actually grow. It's not like someone is going to roll out of bed one day and be swollen to the degree that's unattractive and compromising to recreational running. It's a long-term incremental fight to put on muscle under the best of circumstances.

    Assuming someone is basically average with respect to recovery and muscle growth and assuming steroids aren't involved, for all practical purposes, there is no such thing as too much muscle.

    Just consider how many young men are in a gym desperate trying to get all huge, eating like pigs, and yet they still look unremarkable.

    Apply that premise to women and people into middle age, and you can see that clawing your way to improved strength will not get you anywhere near too strong, too big, or compromised in athletics. It can only help. It WILL only help.
    Last edited by brittney_bodine; 03-04-2014 at 10:44 AM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Naperville, Illinois
    Posts
    306
    I'm not schizophrenic. I was answering someone's question before they edited.

  8. #18
    Jenry Hennings's Avatar
    Jenry Hennings is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by brittney_bodine View Post
    I'm not schizophrenic. I was answering someone's question before they edited.
    As the other side to your personality, i can vouch for that.

  9. #19
    Scooter's Avatar
    Scooter is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    4
    Jerry, could you please expand on this? I'd say that this is about right for distance runners.

    Thanks.

    "What mark describes is something very few runners actually put in to practise, and it's said that 80% of weekly mileage should be easy. It's an outdated method of training, which might explain why he was such a self proclaimed wreck when he retired."

  10. #20
    Jenry Hennings's Avatar
    Jenry Hennings is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by Scooter View Post
    Jerry, could you please expand on this? I'd say that this is about right for distance runners.

    Thanks.

    "What mark describes is something very few runners actually put in to practise, and it's said that 80% of weekly mileage should be easy. It's an outdated method of training, which might explain why he was such a self proclaimed wreck when he retired."
    Ok, the first sentence is what I actually meant. I just didn't make the two points clear enough. My bad!
    The second sentence was a comment on what I assume, based on mark's description, his training would have looked like, which would be a lot of threshold/medium to high intensity training as the only way to see progression to be competitive as an endurance athlete. The old 'if you want to run faster, run faster more'. What I meant by that was obviously the harder you train, the more exhausted you feel when you don't let up on the intensity and in the case of professional athletes, that's everyday of the week. Coupled with his ben and jerry's a day habit he had, and all round poor diet, he wasn't giving his body any chance of recovery.

    Hope that makes a little more sense!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •