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  1. #1
    Wanderer's Avatar
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    Devils advocate

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    Hi,


    Just to play devils advocate, I am curious how many members here are from The U.S. as compared to other countries. I wonder how many diet forums there are around the globe. I truly donít know and this is a serious query. I have to wonder because I see varied ways of eating around this earth and some that we try to follow in this country (U.S.A.) that really donít match a PB way. Could it be only us? I know that the food industry and the food (or so called food) here is the cause of all the illness and poor health here but is it only us always seeking the latest info on ways of eating?

    In some diets we find low fat beliefs yet in some cultures they eat high fat with no problemÖsome even smoke! On the other hand we have low carb and in the case of PB it goes the way of more meat and less or no grains, legumes etc (correct me if Iím wrongÖ.Iím still learning). Yet we have the Sardinians who live to over 100 who eat a lot of grains/pasta and have meat only as a treat rarely, in small amounts (maybe on Sunday 3-5 oz?). They eat a lot of fish, whole grains, fruit, oils and goat cheese.
    Okinawans are similar and their meat consumption is low, Iíve read as low as 2 oz. Many Asian countries only flavor the dish with meat/chicken rather than making it the main portion. They also eat a good deal of rice (donít they?). White rice at that. The Okinawans also live passed 100 and Americans try to follow their diet secrets.

    Even in this country there have been many people who have thrived and lived to ripe old ages as well as stayed fit by following a regimen of exercise and what has always been referred to as ďproper eating.Ē Traditional diet? Jack Lalanne comes to mind and many like him. Actually (Iíve studied him and read his book) he hasnít eaten meat since his early teens accept for a brief period when he attempted to win a body building contest. He states that at the time it was the belief that you needed meat to pack on muscle. He went back to vegetarian after that only consuming fish on occasion. So it seems there are all kinds. I personally have believed in eating real foods. Donít buy something someone else madeÖ.make it yourself from real food. Animals that you can see and touch at a farm fresh killed for you and plant sources from the same places. Eating this way (for me) has worked and my weight as well as bloodwork etc are all good and always have been. Iím the same weight now that I was 30 years ago and as a kid I was always thin to medium. I have always exercised but doing it seriously for the last 30 years. I feel great lately and my latest diet enhancements may play a role. Iíve been eating good for so long itís had to tell anymore. I still workout very hard (Iím 53).

    All this primal information makes sense and Iím sure we werenít designed to eat many things in our diet today (today meaning the last 10,000 years or so). But from what I understand we are naturally missing a gland needed for milk consumption? (cowís milk). Again, I donít know if this is true. But persistence made us adapt and now we do drink milk. Some of us are intolerant still, but more of us are able to drink it than not, I think. The human animal adapts although it takes time. At the moment I am trying to learn more about this stuff to again possibly enhance my eating habits as I get older. Iím not sure how much better I can do or feel but you never know right?

    As for adapting to grains? I guess it may be wreaking havoc on many of us but I also donít see it going away. When money is involved you can forget it and this is all about the almighty dollar. It may take another few million years but I think we are evolving to be more grain efficient. Unfortunately probably chemical efficient too!!!
    So is this global? What about the many different ways of eating? What about the many who have no clue about how much of anything they eat or nutritional valuesÖ.not internet? Is eating that difficult that we need to ďstudyĒ it and learn it? Or is it just that bad in the U.S.?

  2. #2
    Funkadelic Flash's Avatar
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    Call me selfish, but I don't care if eating grains will help to better adapt future generations to survive on them. I'm doing what makes me feel best so that I can live the best life possible; this includes eating plenty of pastured beef, seafood, and veggies with an occasional piece of fruit and sweet potato/yam. My body is loving me for it.

    Also, to address your concern of only US citizens following the PB: There are numerous forum members from Canada, Sweden, Norway, Finland, the UK, Italy, New Zealand, Australia, and The Pacific Islands (Samoa) just to name a few. I'm sure there's representation from nearly any country with the privilege to access information via the internet.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Funkadelic Flash View Post
    Call me selfish, but I don't care if eating grains will help to better adapt future generations to survive on them.
    It won't. I'm not terribly interested in writing an essay why not right now. Maybe serialsinner or stabby does?

    Milk is different *entirely*. Because we all drank milk - even though human milk differs vastly from cow milk- and we evolved drinking milk. The lateral shift to the milk of other species cannot be compared to introducing an entirely new food substance.
    Last edited by cillakat; 06-22-2010 at 01:29 PM.



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    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
    Is eating that difficult that we need to “study” it and learn it? Or is it just that bad in the U.S.?
    Unfortunately, yes it is something we need to study and learn what works best in our bodies. There is so much misinformation about food and optimal eating that people don't know where to turn or what to eat. Butter used to be good, then it became bad, then margarine was good, now margarine is bad, now butter is good...in moderation! It seems everyone talks about moderation these days. "You can eat anything you want as long as it is in moderation." Unfortunately, modern society is able to pass information so quickly it becomes misinformation, much like playing the game telephone. One person adulterates an idea and tells someone else about it. By the time it gets back to the source, it is not even recognizable or seemingly related to the original message.

    Sometimes you just have to get back to basics. You seem to know the basics. Start with real food. Real meat, real fish, real poultry, real pork and real vegetables. Heck, even if you subscribe to Jack Lelane's ideals, he does eat fish, you can obtain a desirable physique. He actually aligns closely with Andrew Weil's ideal of a vegetarian diet with fish as the main protein (meat) source.

    The breakdown comes with the notion that we need grains as part of our diet. Why do we need grains? Are grains going to make us live longer if we adapt? Why would that be if they are inflammatory?
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    Wanderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Funkadelic Flash View Post
    Call me selfish, but I don't care if eating grains will help to better adapt future generations to survive on them. I'm doing what makes me feel best so that I can live the best life possible; this includes eating plenty of pastured beef, seafood, and veggies with an occasional piece of fruit and sweet potato/yam. My body is loving me for it.
    Oh, I'm not suggesting we just go with the flow or "prep" humankind for the future. I was only commenting on the fact that it isn't going to stop. I suspect Governments will find processing methods to make food less processed Say what? What I mean is....we're screwed (as a whole). Grain is too big a business along with corn and soy. I won't be satisfied even if they remove that stuff from our food. That will probably only mean I can't find it anymore.....still there, somewhere, but now more hidden.
    But I still always remain curious as well as interested in the many ways of eating in this world. Some in complete contrast to others yet still healthy.

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    Okinawans are similar and their meat consumption is low, I’ve read as low as 2 oz. Many Asian countries only flavor the dish with meat/chicken rather than making it the main portion. They also eat a good deal of rice (don’t they?). White rice at that. The Okinawans also live passed 100 and Americans try to follow their diet secrets.
    Actually, the study discussing the Okinawans diet dismissed the fact that they use a lot of lard in thier cooking, and pork plays a valuable role in thier diet. I have read many places that, that particular study is flawed in that regard. Oh and the white rice they eat is handled differently then the white rice we eat here in the States.
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    Okinawans (in contrast to their northern neighbors, the Japanese) eat mostly vegetables and fat with a relatively small amount of rice/noodles.
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    One of the reasons why studying food is so complicated is because in order to study something, you isolate it. That way, you know that any reactions are caused by the single thing.

    Now, think about food. How often do you eat an entire meal made out of a single ingredient? All those ingredients interact, and there's no real good way of studying that. Plus, there are the social connections (see the Framington study -- if your friends are thin and active, chances are you'll stay thin and active.) Put it all together and it becomes a complex as well as complicated system.

    Me -- eating primally takes away my headaches and gives me tons of energy. So I'm sticking with it.

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    About the Okinawan diet:
    The Satsamu sweet potato provides the largest part of the energy intake
    Source
    Not grain, not meat, but a paleo starchy tuber. Here is something to think about.
    Height: 5'4" (1.62 m)
    Starting weight (09/2009): 200 lb (90.6 kg)
    No longer overweight (08/2010): 145 lb (65.6 kg)
    Current weight (01/2012): 127 lb (57.5 kg)

  10. #10
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    The average Okinawan consumes at least seven servings of vegetables, and an equal
    number of whole grains (noodles, bread, and rice), daily
    . Two to four servings of fruit,
    along with soy beans, green tea, and seaweed, round out the diet. Omega‐3‐rich fish is
    eaten about three times per week. The diet emphasizes dark green, calcium‐rich
    vegetables. Meat, poultry, and eggs account for only 3% of the diet.
    Source (pdf)

    source 2

    I am more inclined towards thinking that Okinawan's longevity is more linked to Caloric Restriction rather than the composition of their diet.
    Last edited by SerialSinner; 06-27-2010 at 04:09 PM. Reason: added extra source (first one seems pretty lame)
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