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Thread: So, apparently I have ALL THE ALLERGIES page

  1. #1
    CaveMama's Avatar
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    So, apparently I have ALL THE ALLERGIES

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    I have been primal off and on for a couple years. I've been having more and more trouble breathing (asthma symptoms) and I've always been prone to itchy, sneezy type stuff...

    I went to an allergist/respiratory doctor today and they did allergy testing (never had it done before) and I was significantly allergic to almost everything they tested me for (not foods, just environmental stuff).

    He thinks that my constant tiredness and depression is related to my allergies.

    So, now I have an inhaler and he wants to start allergy shots.

    Any thoughts, research, or personal experiences to share?
    Last edited by CaveMama; 02-20-2014 at 02:05 PM.

  2. #2
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    My experience with allergy shots was horrendous. I had one of the worst flares of eczema after having allergy shots (I had them weekly for months). What has helped me more is keeping my diet very low carb. Sugar in inflammatory so if you cut it out, the inflammation should reduce. I can always tell when I have been eating too many carbs - my thyroid swells and my asthma comes back. If I'm careful, I have no asthma at all and swallowing is easier. My eczema is better but I have found that to get rid of it completely, I have to eat very little food which is difficult for me.

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    there are a bunch of sites out there that discuss histamine intolerance and how that manifests into allergic reactions to foods and the environment
    there are various versions of a low histamine diet and quite a few are paleo, there is even a whole 30 low histamine version

    That Paleo Guy has a good post on histamine response

    lowhistaminechef is more veggie, Furman style eating but she is at least whole foods and has a lot of good tips on how to reduce histamine in your diet which may alleviate your allergic reactions. she covers food as well as environment

    fair warning, the lists of high histamine or histamine inducing foods/triggers are wide and often contradict each other but that is often to do with how an individual reacts (ie I might react to strawberries whereas you react to mango)
    if you google histamine intolerance and paleo there are a lot of hits, or just histamine intolerance (or mast cell disorders) and Dr Joneja you will find a good starting point for research

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    Get your D3 level checked. My allergies of all types have decreased significantly since I got my blood level up to 80 ng/ml. My asthma has disappeared completely.

    More info at Vitamin D | Vitamin D Council | Providing information on vitamin D

  5. #5
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    Chris Kresser says that food intolerance tests are EXTREMELY inaccurate in this podcast:

    Food Allergy Testing, Tricks for Flu Season and Exclusive Book Bonuses

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Kresser
    Thatís a great question, and Iím continuously reevaluating that question because there are all these new tests becoming available and new options for clinicians, but each time I look at the research Iím continually disappointed by the lack of evidence supporting any of the food allergy testing. I think Cyrex Labs probably has the best available food allergy testing thatís out there, but theyíre only really looking at cross-reactive proteins that are related to gluten intolerance, and even then, Iím still not 100% sold that itís accurate. I think food allergy testing, though, can be used as a springboard or as a basis for experimentation, a jumping-off point, if you will. What that means is you do a food allergy test, you get it back, and it says youíre allergic to strawberries, celery, and egg whites. Rather than just take that at face value and completely eliminate those foods from your diet forever, you could try a period of a couple weeks or three weeks where you donít eat that those foods at all and then add them back in and see if they are a problem for you. If you look at the research, the elimination/provocation protocol, which I just mentioned Ė you know, taking foods out of your diet and adding them back in Ė is still the gold standard for food allergy testing. And if you go to a top-flight food allergist, thatís what theyíll do. They may use some of the testing in the way that I described as a way of figuring out how to structure the elimination diet, but really I think you still have to do that kind of testing and thereís no reason to avoid a healthy food like celery or strawberries just on the basis of these test results without doing your own personal testing.
    Also: Testing for SIBO, Graves Disease, and all about Anemia

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Kresser
    And then there are also tests for food intolerance and tests for leaky gut, though I think those are less useful... As far as food intolerance testing goes, weíve either talked about it on the show or Iíve written about it or both, but I donít consider food intolerance testing to be very useful for a couple different reasons. Number one, and Iím pretty sure Iíve mentioned this on the show, there have been some kind of blinded trials done anecdotally by clinicians, where theyíve drawn their own blood and put it two vials, you know, on the same day, same blood draw, and labeled the two vials with different names and sent them into the same lab and come back with completely different results for the two different vials of blood that came from the same person on the same day. So thatís a little suspect. And then number two, even if the test was completely reliable, the question is still whatís causing those food intolerances? I mean, food intolerance is a symptom; itís not a disease. Thereís an underlying disease or pathology thatís causing those food intolerances, and that would usually be SIBO or intestinal permeability or a parasite or a fungal infection or some other gut problem, maybe a gut-brain axis issue or maybe gluten exposure, undiagnosed gluten intolerance. Those are mechanisms. Those are problems that lead to symptoms. So if you just remove the foods that the food intolerance testing shows that youíre sensitive to, certainly that will help with the symptoms, and thereís nothing wrong with that, but assuming you want to be able to eat some of those foods again, addressing the underlying problem is a much better approach. So I donít put a lot of stock into food intolerance testing for those reasons.
    Last edited by Drumroll; 02-20-2014 at 04:51 PM.
    "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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    star's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaveMama View Post
    I have been primal off and on for a couple years. I've been having more and more trouble breathing (asthma symptoms) and I've always been prone to itchy, sneezy type stuff...

    I went to an allergist/respiratory doctor today and they did allergy testing (never had it done before) and I was significantly allergic to almost everything they tested me for (not foods, just environmental stuff).

    He thinks that my constant tiredness and depression is related to my allergies.

    So, now I have an inhaler and he wants to start allergy shots.

    Any thoughts, research, or personal experiences to share?
    How tiredness and depression is related to allergies? If its environmental , it must be allergy to dust and pollen and its hay fever?
    Allergy shots is effective for indoor allergies like dust mites, cockroaches, mold or pet danger like cat or dog hair and for seasonal allergies like hay fever, or tree, grass or weed pollens. You have to continue to get shots one or two times per week for several months. Running an air filter while you sleep might be of help too.

  7. #7
    Bifcus's Avatar
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    Removing dairy made the biggest difference to my allergy reactions. Giving up gluten took care of almost all the rest of it. I don't take asthmatic meds any more.

    If you are eating dairy, you might try seeing what happens without it.

  8. #8
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    Try not to get too reliant on the inhaler. I take one puff as opposed to the regular two when my asthma flares up. Of course, take the recommended two if you need to!

    Seconded on removing gluten/dairy. I know some people who have had great success managing their asthma that way. Unfortunately, it does not work for me.

    Try an air purifier in your bedroom while you sleep.
    Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

    Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
    Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
    Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
    F/23/5'9"

    26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by star View Post
    How tiredness and depression is related to allergies? If its environmental , it must be allergy to dust and pollen and its hay fever?
    Allergy shots is effective for indoor allergies like dust mites, cockroaches, mold or pet danger like cat or dog hair and for seasonal allergies like hay fever, or tree, grass or weed pollens. You have to continue to get shots one or two times per week for several months. Running an air filter while you sleep might be of help too.
    Sorry for double post, but I had to answer this: when your body is suffering (strained) you get tired. When breathing is difficult as with asthma, it literally is a workout. Difficulty breathing makes it impossible to sleep, as your body naturally wakes during asthma (thank God). Poor sleep also leads to tiredness, which then effects mood. Ever meet a crabby person in the morning? Consider someone who is constantly suffering to be constantly crabby, bad mood, fed up. It can lead to depression, easily.
    Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

    Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
    Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
    Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
    F/23/5'9"

    26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

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