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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrHackenbush View Post
    ...

    Can diet really affect sweat? I don't really know how true that is. It seems like pseudoscience. Your sweat is just saltwater, is it not?
    Quote Originally Posted by DrHackenbush View Post
    I'm not exactly an expert on this topic
    clearly.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    – Ernest Hemingway

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by noodletoy View Post
    clearly.
    Check out that last article that I posted.

  3. #13
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    Toxin really isn't all that hard to define. Its just that the category is so large and we have polluted our air, food, water, soil and home with so many of them that I literally have a 28 page list of well known toxic substances many come into contact with all to frequently and in significant amounts to be detrimental to health. Here is a single category as an example:

    Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine Society has stated that ”the evidence for adverse reproductive outcomes (infertility, cancers, malformations) from exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals is strong, and there is mounting evidence for effects on other endocrine systems, including thyroid, neuroendocrine, obesity, and metabolism, and insulin and glucose homeostasis”.

    The group of molecules identified as endocrine disruptors includes the following:
    Industrial solvents /lubricants and their byproducts
    - Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
    - Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs)
    - Dioxins
    Plastics
    - Bisphenol A (BPA)
    Plasticizers
    - Phthalates
    Pesticides
    - Methoxychlor
    - Chlorpyrifos
    - Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)
    Fungicides
    - Vinclozolin
    Pharmaceutical agents
    - Diethylstilbestrol (DES)
    Phytoestrogens
    - Genistien
    - Coumestrol

    As to what causes BO what bacteria populating the skin is my understanding. And yes it has a lot to do with diet, lifestyle, and general health.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Toxin really isn't all that hard to define. Its just that the category is so large and we have polluted our air, food, water, soil and home with so many of them that I literally have a 28 page list of well known toxic substances many come into contact with all to frequently and in significant amounts to be detrimental to health. Here is a single category as an example:

    Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine Society has stated that ”the evidence for adverse reproductive outcomes (infertility, cancers, malformations) from exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals is strong, and there is mounting evidence for effects on other endocrine systems, including thyroid, neuroendocrine, obesity, and metabolism, and insulin and glucose homeostasis”.

    The group of molecules identified as endocrine disruptors includes the following:
    Industrial solvents /lubricants and their byproducts
    - Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
    - Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs)
    - Dioxins
    Plastics
    - Bisphenol A (BPA)
    Plasticizers
    - Phthalates
    Pesticides
    - Methoxychlor
    - Chlorpyrifos
    - Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)
    Fungicides
    - Vinclozolin
    Pharmaceutical agents
    - Diethylstilbestrol (DES)
    Phytoestrogens
    - Genistien
    - Coumestrol

    As to what causes BO what bacteria populating the skin is my understanding. And yes it has a lot to do with diet, lifestyle, and general health.
    I'm still not following you. BO (the type we're talking about) is due to bacteria on the skin, but sweat is mostly saltwater with a tiny bit of toxin in it. And even then, those toxins are not likely to cause particular bacterial colonies, right? I'm not seeing the direct diet causation. I can go with a diet, lifestyle, and health correlation because these things indicate care for the body, so they probably wear clean clothes and clean themselves well when necessary.

    I agree that use of these toxins should be reduced or eliminated, so as to prevent contamination in our bodies. But how do we know exactly how much they affect us, what our limits are on these chemicals, and how to remove them? I don't think we have clear answers to any of those questions, save for perhaps a few chemicals. Mostly, we need to have public interests come before private interests by doing the proper research and regulation.
    Last edited by DrHackenbush; 02-08-2014 at 07:07 PM.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrHackenbush View Post
    I'm still not following you. BO (the type we're talking about) is due to bacteria on the skin, but sweat is mostly saltwater with a tiny bit of toxin in it. And even then, those toxins are not likely to cause particular bacterial colonies, right? I'm not seeing the direct diet causation. I can go with a diet, lifestyle, and health correlation because these things indicate care for the body, so they probably wear clean clothes and clean themselves well when necessary.

    I agree that use of these toxins should be reduced or eliminated, so as to prevent contamination in our bodies. But how do we know exactly how much they affect us, what our limits are on these chemicals, and how to remove them? I don't think we have clear answers to any of those questions, save for perhaps a few chemicals. Mostly, we need to have public interests come before private interests by doing the proper research and regulation.
    Ah, I see why you are not following. I'm not attributing BO to toxins being secreted at all. The aside about toxins was simply to point out that they are not some unidentifiable boogeyman concept. Actually there is quite a lot known about these various toxins. There are even some ways to test for them directly to determine if one has accumulated significant doses. When lacking that there are proxies like clearance tests to determine if certain enzyme and pathways are working sufficiently. The thing about what you are asking "exact amounts to determine effect"....well that is going to be nigh on impossible to determine due to each and every individual having a different tolerance level to various toxins AND the millions of combinations of toxins that there are. A single toxin may be easy enough to determine, but now you have to cross that and test that singular one with this other one and this one and this one.....its exponential. Look into a concept called allostatic load. I think its probably the best model to use when considering environmental toxins. Anyhow back to BO... the skin flora is much like the gut biome from my understanding. Both can shift and change in response to different lifestyle choices and exposures. I really don't think that this is a very contentious opinion to hold. It seems logical to me. But I'm not a dermatologist either

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Ah, I see why you are not following. I'm not attributing BO to toxins being secreted at all. The aside about toxins was simply to point out that they are not some unidentifiable boogeyman concept. Actually there is quite a lot known about these various toxins. There are even some ways to test for them directly to determine if one has accumulated significant doses. When lacking that there are proxies like clearance tests to determine if certain enzyme and pathways are working sufficiently. The thing about what you are asking "exact amounts to determine effect"....well that is going to be nigh on impossible to determine due to each and every individual having a different tolerance level to various toxins AND the millions of combinations of toxins that there are. A single toxin may be easy enough to determine, but now you have to cross that and test that singular one with this other one and this one and this one.....its exponential. Look into a concept called allostatic load. I think its probably the best model to use when considering environmental toxins. Anyhow back to BO... the skin flora is much like the gut biome from my understanding. Both can shift and change in response to different lifestyle choices and exposures. I really don't think that this is a very contentious opinion to hold. It seems logical to me. But I'm not a dermatologist either
    I would like to learn more about toxins. Do you have that 28 page list to send me or any other recommendations?

    I think skin flora does work that way too. And constant vigorous washing of the skin could be somewhat akin to medical-grade antibiotic consumption. Therefore, for the healthiest skin, do not shower too much! And from my experience and knowledge of sweat, you will not smell if you take care of yourself!

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrHackenbush View Post
    I would like to learn more about toxins. Do you have that 28 page list to send me or any other recommendations?

    I think skin flora does work that way too. And constant vigorous washing of the skin could be somewhat akin to medical-grade antibiotic consumption. Therefore, for the healthiest skin, do not shower too much! And from my experience and knowledge of sweat, you will not smell if you take care of yourself!
    The list is part of a series of courses in functional medicine that I took and looks to be copyrighted and whatnot, but I can give you the reference list:

    1. Indoor Air Quality and Personal Exposure Assessment Program, Fact Sheet: Sources and Potential Health Effects of Indoor Air Pollutants, March 24, 2003, Health Effects of Indoor Pollutants
    2. The Medical Biochemistry Page, Dr. Michael W. King, PhD, The Medical Biochemistry Page
    3. Laboratory Evaluations for Integrative and Functional Medicine, 2nd ed., Richard S. Lord, J. Alexander Bralley, Metametrix Institute, Duluth, GA

  8. #18
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    Death by rubber duck is a good book.
    Can't remember who wrote it.
    2 guys experimenting on themselves with everyday toxins (including the ones in rubber ducks)

    What I ment with the toxins is that they effect your whole body, and will effect how your skin(the bodies largest organ) will deal with bacteria and what bacteria will grow (think of your gut flora, but on the outside, and also different)

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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hannakb View Post
    Death by rubber duck is a good book.
    Can't remember who wrote it.
    2 guys experimenting on themselves with everyday toxins (including the ones in rubber ducks)

    What I ment with the toxins is that they effect your whole body, and will effect how your skin(the bodies largest organ) will deal with bacteria and what bacteria will grow (think of your gut flora, but on the outside, and also different)

    Sent from my HTC_PN071 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
    99% of the toxins are not being excreted in sweat. How else are they getting to the skin? I guess they can accidentally be stored there just like anywhere else in the body. Then suppose they're on the skin, even if they affect the bacteria, why would it smell more?

    Do you realize why IBS smells so bad? Ugh, I'm a moron for not mentioning this earlier. There are things stuck in their digestive system; it doesn't even have to be the anal cavity. These things ferment/rot and release constant gas (which is just a form, like solid and liquid) that makes them smell. Farts only happen when these gases are backed up and released instantly. That's not necessarily the case if you have a mostly empty stomach but have rotting pieces of food stuck to your intestines.

    I think you're reaching.

    I'm going to check out the book though.
    Last edited by DrHackenbush; 02-08-2014 at 10:34 PM.

  10. #20
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    I said they effect your body, not that they were excreted onto your skin.

    If your body's not working properly it effects everything.

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