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Thread: If chronic cardio is bad for the heart, is HIIT really bad for the heart?? page

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    If chronic cardio is bad for the heart, is HIIT really bad for the heart??

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9g8e...ature=youtu.be
    Ok, so extreme chronic endurance exercise damages the heart.
    But, when I do HIIT/sprints, my heart is POUNDING out of my chest.
    Talk about overuse! This can't be good either.
    Is there any evidence that HIIT causes even worse heart damaged over time than slow cardio?

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    Neckhammer's Avatar
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    No.... not at this time.

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    You don't understand. It's not your heart pounding that is bad. It's the chronic part that is bad. Short bursts turn on all kinds of beneficial hormones in your body. Long term slogging it out kills your mitochondria and down-regulates all those beneficial hormones.
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    Chronic cardio as I understand it is high on long degradation from constant use and pretty low on recovery.

    M.

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    Who is to say pumping at 100% for 5-10 mins doens't also kill mitochondria or whatever? I'd think whatever overuse issues you get from a 2 hour run are also present when the heart is pinned at 100%, even if for a shorter duration. The common denominator is that the heart is being taxed, either way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OnlyBodyWeight View Post
    Who is to say pumping at 100% for 5-10 mins doens't also kill mitochondria or whatever? I'd think whatever overuse issues you get from a 2 hour run are also present when the heart is pinned at 100%, even if for a shorter duration. The common denominator is that the heart is being taxed, either way.
    Not really. You're missing quite a bit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OnlyBodyWeight View Post
    Who is to say pumping at 100% for 5-10 mins doens't also kill mitochondria or whatever? I'd think whatever overuse issues you get from a 2 hour run are also present when the heart is pinned at 100%, even if for a shorter duration. The common denominator is that the heart is being taxed, either way.
    Ummm.... Science?

    Yours might be the common sense answer, or conclusion, but research does not support it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OnlyBodyWeight View Post
    Who is to say pumping at 100% for 5-10 mins doens't also kill mitochondria or whatever? I'd think whatever overuse issues you get from a 2 hour run are also present when the heart is pinned at 100%, even if for a shorter duration. The common denominator is that the heart is being taxed, either way.
    You're right. The heart is indeed being taxed either way. The difference is this: A brief dose of high stress will cause the body to over-compensate to improve it's condition given enough time/nutrition afterwards.

    More frequent and longer duration stress does not necessarily give the body the time to compensate, nor a profound reason to make any significant depth of change.

    In other words, if you did HIIT too frequently that would be just as bad, or worse than chronic cardio.
    Last edited by brittney_bodine; 02-07-2014 at 08:32 AM.

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    Skip to 1:02:00. This should answer your question related to mitochondria and adaptations to exercise.

    Paleo Diet & Strength Training Biochemistry | Doug McGuff M.D. | Full Length HD - YouTube

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    Everything I've ever read supports HIIT over chronic cardio. This is just one such article:

    New Study Shows Cardio Workout May Damage Your Heart

    The question you need to ask though is why any training of this type, do you really need it ?

    Remember: The function of the cardiovascular system is to support the muscular system – not the other way around. If the human body is logical (and we assume that it is) then increases in muscular strength (from a proper strength-training program) will correlate to improvements in cardiovascular function

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