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Thread: Why are whole eggs healthy to eat

  1. #31
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    If you do not consume any fruit and starches and eat a very low carbohydrate diet for years, then try to consume a pound of sweet potatoes, you will likely develop terrible gas and bloating. Do you know why? Your digestive cultures die off, so you can't digest that kind of food anymore. It doesn't mean you're "starch and fruit intolerant." You just screwed up your gut by avoiding that food.
    Aww, you talkin' bout me! That's so sweet! But, hey, thanks for preaching potatoes. I've been slowly eating them more and more and so far so good.
    Steak, eggs, potatoes - fruits, nuts, berries and forage. Coconut milk and potent herbs and spices. Tea instead of coffee now and teeny amounts of kelp daily. Let's see how this does! Not really had dairy much, and gut seems better for it.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    ...They're incredibly nutrient-dense and contain next to no anti-nutrients.

    ...

    All that matters is nutrition-per-calorie vs anti-nutrients-per-calorie.

    Why drink milk and eat eggs? They are extremely nutritious, have tons of fat-soluble nutrients, have the highest quality protein in nature and contain next to zero anti-nutrients. That's why you eat milk and eggs.

    Why avoid wheat bread and soybean oil? They contain tons of calories, very little nutrition and tons of anti-nutrients. That's why you avoid bread and soybean oil.
    This.

    Since going Primal, I look at food as an efficiency game. Which foods give the most (or, higher) nutrition for the amount being served/consumed?

    The above quote sums it up nicely!

    Why eat two donuts for breakfast when I can eat the same amount of bacon, eggs and avocado and be much healthier for it!?!
    Began Primal Living: 25 Sep 2012
    Starting Weight: 82kg (180 lbs) - Lost 30 lbs since going Primal!

    "I do not eat enough carbs to justify eating low-fat."
    "Have some bread with your bread, pasta, bread, and HFCS." - Unicorn
    "I also walk my dog twice a day now instead of paying someone else to do it." - IronGirl
    "Tell me you're not weak minded enough to be outsmarted by a donut?" - not on the rug



  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knifegill View Post
    Aww, you talkin' bout me! That's so sweet! But, hey, thanks for preaching potatoes. I've been slowly eating them more and more and so far so good.
    That's great, I hope conditions continue to improve.

    It's important to note I'm not pro-carb and anti-fat per say. I eat a considerable amount of fat, and still regularly have days where I don't come close to 100g of carbs in a day. I'm for a balanced diet that include foods of maximum nutrient density that promotes a healthy gut. That includes meat, dairy, eggs, fruits and starches. Exclusionary dieting that minimizes your body's ability to tolerate food groups isn't healthy IMO.

    For me to maintain my weight, I only get an allowance of about 2,400 calories a day. I want to make the most of them. Think of it in terms of dollars. I want the most for my metabolic buck.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by PBNewby View Post
    Why eat two donuts for breakfast when I can eat the same amount of bacon, eggs and avocado and be much healthier for it!?!
    Steak, eggs, potatoes, milk, repeat.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  5. #35
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    Not everyone who reacts to milk is lactose intolerant. Some of us have a sensitivity to the caseins and/or whey in it. If you react to dairy, you need to understand what is causing the problem before you can try to fix it.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by vh67 View Post
    Not everyone who reacts to milk is lactose intolerant. Some of us have a sensitivity to the caseins and/or whey in it. If you react to dairy, you need to understand what is causing the problem before you can try to fix it.
    Yeah, I wish I just had a problem with lactose. Apparently my digestion rejected cow's milk formula from birth my mother tells me, which is why I was given soy formula when she couldn't breastfeed. Oddly enough, I didn't react this way to dairy throughout most of my childhood and teenage years; then I hit my 20s and it got worse and worse from there.
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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by j3nn View Post
    Yeah, I wish I just had a problem with lactose. Apparently my digestion rejected cow's milk formula from birth my mother tells me, which is why I was given soy formula when she couldn't breastfeed. Oddly enough, I didn't react this way to dairy throughout most of my childhood and teenage years; then I hit my 20s and it got worse and worse from there.
    Me too. A problem with lactose is much easier to get around. My story is pretty similar. I love cheese and for years I was able to eat goat milk products, which is what I was raised on. In the last few years I started to react even to goat and sheep's milk. My big concern with blanket statements like the ones made in a post above is that not all people can drink milk as there are multiple reasons for reactions to it.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    It's important to note I'm not pro-carb and anti-fat per say. I eat a considerable amount of fat, and still regularly have days where I don't come close to 100g of carbs in a day. I'm for a balanced diet that include foods of maximum nutrient density that promotes a healthy gut. That includes meat, dairy, eggs, fruits and starches. Exclusionary dieting that minimizes your body's ability to tolerate food groups isn't healthy IMO.

    For me to maintain my weight, I only get an allowance of about 2,400 calories a day. I want to make the most of them. Think of it in terms of dollars. I want the most for my metabolic buck.
    You should make that your signature. Sometimes when reading your posts lately it seems like you are promoting high carb low fat 80s style diets.

    And regarding exclusions, some of us exlude foods because we are intolerant of them. Many people have great improvements on the autoimmune version of paleo even though it is highly restrictive. We don't develop the intolerance because we started autoimmune paleo.
    Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

    http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

  9. #39
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    I still don't see the geographic/ethnic distribution of milk tolerance addressed. Hard to believe a billion Chinese just have bad guts.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by j3nn View Post
    Yeah, I wish I just had a problem with lactose. Apparently my digestion rejected cow's milk formula from birth my mother tells me, which is why I was given soy formula when she couldn't breastfeed. Oddly enough, I didn't react this way to dairy throughout most of my childhood and teenage years; then I hit my 20s and it got worse and worse from there.
    Have you ever read the ingredients in "cow's milk formula?"

    Similac® Advance®

    Nonfat Milk, Lactose, Whey Protein Concentrate, High Oleic Safflower Oil, Soy Oil, Coconut Oil, Galactooligosaccharides. Less than 2% of the Following: C. Cohnii Oil, M. Alpina Oil, Beta-Carotene, Lutein, Lycopene, Potassium Citrate, Calcium Carbonate, Ascorbic Acid, Soy Lecithin, Potassium Chloride, Magnesium Chloride, Ferrous Sulfate, Choline Bitartrate, Choline Chloride, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Salt, Taurine, m-Inositol, Zinc Sulfate, Mixed Tocopherols, d-Alpha-Tocopheryl Acetate, Niacinamide, Calcium Pantothenate, L-Carnitine, Vitamin A Palmitate, Cupric Sulfate, Thiamine Chloride Hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Manganese Sulfate, Phylloquinone, Biotin, Sodium Selenate, Vitamin D3, Cyanocobalamin, Calcium Phosphate, Potassium Phosphate, Potassium Hydroxide, and Nucleotides (Adenosine 5’-Monophosphate, Cytidine 5’-Monophosphate, Disodium Guanosine 5’-Monophosphate, Disodium Uridine 5’-Monophosphate).
    Contains milk and soy ingredients.
    I think it's unfair to say it was the milk that did it, especially since the only "milk" ingredients in most of these "milk-based formulas" is dehydrated milk powder and whey protein. If I ever have a child, I swear I'm making my own formula.

    1.) Buy grassfed whole milk. Heat it until it steams.
    2.) Take a dozen eggs and whisk them into a bowl completely.
    3.) Slowly pour hot milk into eggs while whisking to temper.

    Bam. Baby formula. If the baby doesn't like it, I'll add maple syrup.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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