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Thread: Kerrygold Butter No Longer 100% Grass Fed

  1. #11
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    As I live in the desert and cows around here are more likely to eat scorpions than grass, I will stick with Kerry Gold. 90% sounds decent enough to me. Even the author of the article admits that her 'extremely corn and soy sensitive daughter has been eating Kerrygold without visible issue.' As I am neither, I'll happily not let the perfect get in the way of the good.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunnysara View Post
    Doesn't Organic Valley now offer a butter that is 100% pasture fed? Or grass fed? I can't remember exactly how it's labeled. It is more expensive than their regular organic butter that is pasture raised (again, I can't remember the exact label!).
    Pasture fed. It is only available for a few months each summer. I, um, cough, about live on it. I might go into depression when it runs out. I've considered stockpiling...
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakejoh10 View Post
    I'm pretty sure it was never exactly 100% grass-fed (someone correct me if I'm wrong).
    I started using KG butter a few months ago. I read everything there was to be had on the KG and KG-USA websites. They were proud of the fact that the cows were in pasture for ten months of the year and during the other two, ate hay and silage cut from their fields.

    So, yes, it was 100% grass fed.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by OnTheBayou View Post
    I started using KG butter a few months ago. I read everything there was to be had on the KG and KG-USA websites. They were proud of the fact that the cows were in pasture for ten months of the year and during the other two, ate hay and silage cut from their fields.

    So, yes, it was 100% grass fed.
    I'll remain skeptical.
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by sqidmark View Post
    Hay is dried grass
    Yes. Not natural/fresh green grass though.

    If a cow only ate hay all year round in a confined lot then saying it grass fed is technically correct too. For me grass fed is pastured on green grass - some hay supplementation may be required at times.


    Quote Originally Posted by sqidmark View Post
    This is what grass fed cows eat over the winter.
    Yes hay is often used over the winter but some places in less colder climates can have grass.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    Yes. Not natural/fresh green grass though.

    If a cow only ate hay all year round in a confined lot then saying it grass fed is technically correct too. For me grass fed is pastured on green grass - some hay supplementation may be required at times.




    Yes hay is often used over the winter but some places in less colder climates can have grass.
    What?? There is grass hay and hay made from wheat and oat stalks. Of course livestock is fed grass hay when pasturing isn't possible.

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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    Yes hay is often used over the winter but some places in less colder climates can have grass.
    Not just colder places. Texas is having drought and my uncle was saying they've had to feed their cows a lot of hay lately.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by lea View Post
    Not just colder places. Texas is having drought and my uncle was saying they've had to feed their cows a lot of hay lately.
    Ok maybe places of more moderate climate

    The farmer I buy from rarely has to supplement hay - he has green grass all year round (maybe he doesnt overstock the pastures too)

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by oceangrl View Post
    What?? There is grass hay and hay made from wheat and oat stalks. Of course livestock is fed grass hay when pasturing isn't possible.

    Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2
    I kinda think as hay being dried grass and straw being dried grain stalks (eg wheat and oat stalks) - though a technicality I guess.

    Since the toxins are said to be in the grain/seed (I guess little is in the stalk itself).

    I think live stock would eat some straw too.

    I guess also wild animals eat naturally dried grass at the end of the season so it may not be a big deal if green grass is the bulk of the food.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    I kinda think as hay being dried grass and straw being dried grain stalks (eg wheat and oat stalks) - though a technicality I guess.

    Since the toxins are said to be in the grain/seed (I guess little is in the stalk itself).

    I think live stock would eat some straw too.

    I guess also wild animals eat naturally dried grass at the end of the season so it may not be a big deal if green grass is the bulk of the food.
    Goodness. Toxins are a problem? Feed the beef what they want. End of story.

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