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  • Best Electric Yogurt Maker Brands

    Hi all,

    I'm new here, and find this a fabulous forum with some of the most knowledgeable people out there.

    Just wondering if any of you have successfully used a nice, robust yogurt maker. Ideally, if it works for all kinds of milk and cultures (I mention this because some seem to work best with their cultures, like here in Australia Easiyo seems to work with it's own branded starter packs, which incidentally are not really just the culture - they have milk powder and flavour etc.).

    Would highly appreciate comments/experiences.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    You really don't need a special maker for yogurt if you already have a Crockpot slow-cooker. Heat your milk in the crockpot until it reaches pasteurization temp ( look it up online as there are different lengths of time to hold different temps to achieve this.). Then cool the milk to between 115-105 degrees Fahrenheit. Add your live culture, mixing gently but thoroughly. I use a high quality plain yogurt purchased from my grocery store to get my first batch and then just use my made yogurt as a starter from that point on. The important thing is that the starter yogurt needs to have live cultures in it. Also, it is worth noting that every brand of plain yogurt tastes different, so you want to find one you like the taste of as your homemade yogurt will be similar in taste. Add the culture by gradually combining it with small amounts of the warm milk first, and mixing it until dissolved- about a quarter cups worth should do it- and then stirring it in to the batch in the crock. Next, put the lid back on the crock, cover it in a couple of heavy beach towels to keep it warm, and let it sit (turned off) for 24 hours or so. Eat right away or refrigerate and enjoy it cold. Just make sure you start your next batch before you run out so you have starter for it. Use one Tablespoon (15 ml) starter per half gallon (2 liters even would be fine) of milk. Store your yogurt in an all glass container in the fridge ( plastic lid is okay). The benefit of using a Crockpot is that you can't scorch the milk if you keep it on the low setting, and you can make very large batches. I make it a gallon at a time.

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    • #3
      Any point to the pasteurization of already pasteurized milk?

      M.

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      • #4
        You are pasteurizing it again because you are pouring the milk into a presumably non-sterile container for the culturing process. You don't want to be growing bad bacteria alongside your yogurt bacteria. The live yogurt cultures are simply beneficial bacteria, and you are creating the perfect environment (warm temperature and nutrients) for maximum replication. Harmful bacteria will replicate as well if there happen to be any present. Pasteurization is the process of heating to the correct temp for the correct length of time to kill ALL bacteria present. The reason to cool the milk to the proper temperature before you add your yogurt culture is to prevent killing your yogurt culture bacteria.

        Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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        • #5
          Makes sense. I skipped that step on my first attempt (slow cooker method) and it wasn't the best. My second attempt went much better, however! Went full on and strained it to concentrate the protein and fat. Not sure what I'm going to do with all that whey, though.

          M.

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          • #6
            Great. You can also make yogurt cheese by lining a colander with cheesecloth, and straining the liquid out. Just place it in the fridge over a bowl for 12-24 hours until it is the consistency you want. It will be spreadable like cream cheese.

            Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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            • #7
              That's what I did; figured I made "Greek" yogurt as a result. I'm a little hazy as to where "Greek" yogurt ends and Labneh cheese begins.

              M.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
                Makes sense. I skipped that step on my first attempt (slow cooker method) and it wasn't the best. My second attempt went much better, however! Went full on and strained it to concentrate the protein and fat. Not sure what I'm going to do with all that whey, though.

                M.
                I just read an article that mentioned using it as the culture for making sour cream, and also using it to make cultured/ fermented veggies. I'm going to give that a try. Google "Oh Lardy" for the articles.

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                • #9
                  I have also read these, via nourished kitchen. I had a whole quart of whey saved in the fridge, but sadly I lost power and wasn't sure if I should trust it after three days warm in the fridge

                  Ah well, after I move and I'm settled in, I will begin these kinds of experiments!

                  M.

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                  • #10
                    For the record, the Yogourmet is highly recommended in the Specific Carbohydrate Diet community. Yogurt, or some kind of fermented food, is a big part of their gut recovery instructions. I've thought about getting it to simplify making yogurt, since my homemade water bath method is hit or miss at times.
                    Depression Lies

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                    • #11
                      Oh nice, thanks!

                      M.

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                      • #12
                        I feed the whey to my dogs. They love it.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by namelesswonder View Post
                          For the record, the Yogourmet is highly recommended in the Specific Carbohydrate Diet community. Yogurt, or some kind of fermented food, is a big part of their gut recovery instructions. I've thought about getting it to simplify making yogurt, since my homemade water bath method is hit or miss at times.
                          What can be simpler than dumping milk in a crock pot and heating it up? I guess having a thermostat and timer on the unit would be simpler and more foolproof, especially if you can't be present for a six hour or so stretch during the heating
                          !
                          Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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                          • #14
                            Also, I make a gallon at a time, and I don't have room for a lot of appliances.

                            You don't need to use a water bath to make yogurt- you only need it if you are heating your milk on a stove to prevent scorching the milk.

                            If your yogurt fails you either put your culture in when the milk was too hot, your culture was dead to start with or you used too much culture. If your milk cools below the optimal temperature all that happens is the fermentation process slows down.

                            For one gallon of milk I use only two tablespoons of culture. For one quart of sour cream I use only 3/4 teaspoon of culture. I use my last batch of yogurt as a culture for both.

                            Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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                            • #15
                              I have and use one of these Yogotherm units... works pretty well!

                              - Yogotherm Yogurt Maker- 2-QT #E69

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