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What type of cookware to use?

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  • #16
    every single day i use my cast iron skillet or my stainless steel sauce pot or my ceramic crock pot
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    Predator not Prey
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    • #17
      Cool so for baking chicken in the oven the.safest.cookware is???? Glass, cast.iron?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by FedorandBjPenn View Post
        Cool so for baking chicken in the oven the.safest.cookware is???? Glass, cast.iron?
        and now you have played that question once too many times

        end of conversation
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        Predator not Prey
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        • #19
          Different cookware is good for different preparations. There's no single "best cookware." Teflon is toxic, the jury is out on bare aluminum, and bare copper is no good (but you'll probably only see bare copper pots for making jam). Stay away from those three. Pretty much everything else is COMPLETELY SAFE. Don't worry too much about it.

          The best cookware depends on what you're doing. Just baking, you're completely fine with pretty much anything. Go with personal preference. I usually just use a cast-iron skillet.

          Cast-iron will hold heat well, but tends to be slow to react to heat changes. It's best for searing (because it heats up without hot spots) and braising (because it holds in heat). Bare cast-iron leeches iron into food, which most people consider a good thing. However, it does react with acidic foods, so you shouldn't cook things like tomato sauce or stews made with wine in bare case-iron. Enameled cast-iron is better for this purpose (I like Le Creuset, although Staub is also great, and Lodge make a great budget enameled cast-iron dutch oven).

          Stainless steel is also slow to react to heat changes. Additionally, the thinner it is, the more likely you are to have hot-spots. However, it's cheap and doesn't react with foods, so that's nice. Sometimes you'll find stainless steel with copper bottoms, which attenuates the hot spots and makes the pan quicker to respond. I recommend these copper bottom pans over regular stainless for sautéing and pan roasting. Plain stainless is fine for boiling/poaching/blanching/steaming, because the heat of the water is what regulates the temperature.

          Clad stainless steel is kind of the gold-standard for me: it's fast-reacting aluminum sandwiched between two layers of stainless steel. It doesn't react with food, it's quick to respond, and doesn't get many hot spots. This is what I use for sautéing and pan roasting. All Clad is my favorite, but Tramontina makes a budget line (available at Wal-Mart).

          Tinned copper is the quickest to respond to changes in heat, and is perfect for delicate sauces. However, it's annoying to clean, and you need to get it retinned constantly, or else the copper will react with your food. Also, the copper will develop a (harmless) patina, which you'll probably want to polish and that's annoying. Plus, copper is by far the most expensive (we're talking over a grand for a set), so probably not worth it.

          Porcelain and glass are fine for baking. Don't use them on the stovetop and you're fine. There have been some quality control issues with newer pyrex (take it out of the fridge and put it in a hot oven and it might explode), so use it mindfully (or just buy vintage).

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          • #20
            Recently received a "stonewell"frying pan. No oil, butter, grease, nothing sticks to it. It's pantastic.
            Last edited by Sol blackcat; 06-29-2013, 06:33 PM.
            FTM. I'm not biased, I hope everybody beats the mags!

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            • #21
              Opinions on swiss diamond cookware?

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              • #22
                sounds like an expensive way to get poisoned
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                Predator not Prey
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                CW 315 | SW 506
                Current Jeans 46 | Starting Jeans 66


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                • #23
                  I use le creuset. Expensive but it won't poison you. And they come in fun colors. It is coated cast iron.
                  "I came to live out loud!" -Emile Zola

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by quelsen View Post
                    sounds like an expensive way to get poisoned
                    Not that expensive. But possibly poisonous, I dunno; that was my question I guess.

                    They do use a non-stick composite, but supposedly its better than ordinary non-stick stuff, both because its different in chemistry and also because there's a lot less of it, ie between the diamonds. And those diamonds stop scratch damage and that horrible flaking thing that teflon does (which is a good way to get poinsoned, disregarding all other concerns).

                    Cast iron is best, I agree. But it has its downsides as well.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Mutton View Post
                      Not that expensive. But possibly poisonous, I dunno; that was my question I guess.

                      They do use a non-stick composite, but supposedly its better than ordinary non-stick stuff, both because its different in chemistry and also because there's a lot less of it, ie between the diamonds. And those diamonds stop scratch damage and that horrible flaking thing that Teflon does (which is a good way to get poisoned, disregarding all other concerns).

                      Cast iron is best, I agree. But it has its downsides as well.
                      i just purchased my first forged iron set of pans and i must say, kid in the proverbial candy store.

                      however i am a foodie as well as a ketozealot

                      all i can say is damn where have you been all my life.



                      i did note they refused to describe what they make the coating out of but diamonds

                      if it bonds a chemically inert substance... it isn't really bonding to it. diamonds created in such a manner that leaves very little if any room to grab hold of it... that stuff has to basically be an epoxy resin... yeah diamond glue.
                      Optimum Health powered by Actualized Self-Knowledge.

                      Predator not Prey
                      Paleo Ketogenic Lifestyle

                      CW 315 | SW 506
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                      Contact me: quelsen@gmail.com

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                      • #26
                        I'm with Quelson, go with Cast Iron.
                        If you get Lodge brand, be picky look at all the ones your store has and get the one that has the smoothest cooking surface. If you have the time, check out some garage sales and see if you can find Griswold or Wagner brand. They are no longer made, so are hard to find. They are more costly but are smoother on the cooking surface than Lodge, so they don't have the food sticky problems that some folks have with Lodge. In the case of cast iron, old does not mean bad, it probably will cook better than a new one. I've got a three Lodge pieces, one is good, the others are a pain in the rear.


                        Check out this site on why and how to use cast iron.
                        How To: Cast Iron Skillet Non-Stick and Lasts a Lifetime
                        The Buck stops here. I am responsible for my past and my future. So for today: I choose to be happy. I will seek wisdom. I will be a servant to others. I will greet this day with a forgiving spirit.

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                        • #27
                          I use cast iron to fry, stainless steel for stovetop boiling and ceramic for baking a chicken. Unless it's a HUGE chicken, in which case I use this... other thing...? Might be stainless steel, not sure about that. Anyway, I'm told copper pans are awesome but they are hellah expensive.
                          Out of context quote for the day:

                          Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

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                          • #28
                            Cast iron, stainless street, pyrex, and enameled cast iron. If I had to pick one it would be cast iron :-)

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                            • #29
                              Stainless steel**

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                              • #30
                                I've been using a Lodge cast iron skillet for a few months now, and I'm really frustrated with it. I've tried all the advice I could find on the web, such as seasoning it in the oven, and oiling it and heating it after use. Nothing works. Eggs leave a film stuck to the pan, and often I can't flip them over without breaking them into pieces. Meat leaves little bits stuck all over the pan. The only way I can get the mess off is by scrubbing with a steel scrubbie, which I know is a no-no on cast iron, but what else can I do?

                                Is it just my pan that's no good, because of the slightly rough surface, like Rig D mentioned? Can anyone please help me before I end up going back to the Tef-crud?

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