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  • Books - What to Read? Need more input!

    I'm a bookaholic and love to read as much as I can around a topic. Here's my wishlist so far:

    Primal Blueprint (duh!)
    The Paleo Diet - Cordain
    Catching Fire - How Cooking Made Us Human

    Any other 'must reads' on food, nutrition, well being and paleoanthropology?
    Steve Ettlinger's book on the food industry, 'Twinkie' looks quite good.
    I have Michael Pollan's 'In Defence of Food', and am thinking of getting the young reader's version of Omnivore's Dilemma for my kids.

  • #2
    You might try the thread on this site called Primal Book Club. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...php?groupid=28

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    • #3
      Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes
      Primal Body, Primal Mind by Nora Gedgaudas
      The Vegetarian Myth by Lierre Keith
      Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Weston A. Price

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Zo View Post
        Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes
        Primal Body, Primal Mind by Nora Gedgaudas
        The Vegetarian Myth by Lierre Keith
        Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Weston A. Price
        Yes, yes, yes and yes. GCBC is revolutionary. It's a commitment but definitely worth it.

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        • #5
          Oh thanks for these suggestions. I'd done a search for books and that thread didn't show.

          So is Weston Price still regarded as worthwhile? I've read some comments that his work was a bit dated and rather limited due to his focus on dental health.

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          • #6
            GCBC refers to Weston Price often and Mark has the Weston Price foundation showing as one of his frequently visited sites.

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            • #7
              In addition to some of the ones mentioned already, I would suggest Lights Out: Sleep, Sugar and Survival

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              • #8
                Voices of the First Day- Awakening in the Aboriginal Dreamtime- Robert Lawlor. Not a primal nutrition book, but a book about Austrailian Aboriginies, who lived about as primally as can be expected until their unfortunate encounters with whitefolks. The book is possibly inaccurate, but it's fascinating stuff.

                One of the things that I always remembered about that book was that by about aged 4 the children pretty much could hunt, and forage their own food, and weren't reliant on the adults to feed them. Mostly in the form of small lizards, but still that's pretty impressive. If it's true LOL.

                Tom Brown Jr.'s books would be pretty good primal reading too. There are all of his survival skills books, which are chock full of great info. Then there are his don juan-esque tales of being tutored by a master Apache tracker, and scout in the pine barrens of NJ. These books are a little bit harder to believe but are fun reads. He tells of walking into the woods to spend a "year in the wild" with nothing but the clothes on his back, and a knife, and coming out 30lbs heavier the next year because he ate so well. At the time I read them I was a little hacked off because I was a nutjob vegan (instead of being a just a nutjob ) and he stated that vegetarianism wasn't a viable option for survival in the wild. Well, I'm over that now, and I still have a hard time swallowing some of his stories, but everyone I've ever talked to who's met him says that he can do what he talks about, and his books on skills seem to back this up.

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                • #9
                  'The Paleo Diet' is pretty average. If you can track down a copy of 'Neanderthin' you will be much better off.

                  ..otherwise Zo started a good list.
                  The "Seven Deadly Sins"

                  Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
                  Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
                  Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

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                  • #10
                    oh, I thought Cordain was one of the key authors.

                    Life Without Bread sounds quite interesting.

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                    • #11
                      I'm reading Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes book. He recommends a low carb diet, and is a 74 year old Type 1 Diabetic. Most don't live that long.
                      My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

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                      • #12
                        Since you asked for recommendations of books on "well being," let me suggest Dan John's "Never Let Go." It's a collection of Coach John's essays about, as he calls it, "Lifting, Living, and Learning." It was a tremendously transformational and uplifting read for me because he really encourages us to adopt a more playful and Primal attitude toward fitness efforts.

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                        • #13
                          Re: (psychological) well-being, this book is a must read. Can't recommend it enough: "How I Found Freedom in an Unfree World: A Handbook for Personal Liberty" by Harry Browne
                          Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future. -Oscar Wilde
                          "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                          "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SerialSinner View Post
                            Re: (psychological) well-being, this book is a must read. Can't recommend it enough: "How I Found Freedom in an Unfree World: A Handbook for Personal Liberty" by Harry Browne
                            SS that does look awesome but gee it is a lot of money for a book!

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                            • #15
                              I heard there might be a PDF download link. PM me if you're interested
                              Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future. -Oscar Wilde
                              "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                              "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

                              Comment

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