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Curing Hypothyroidism

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  • #16
    I feel like such a dork. I found this thread through a board search, but failed to realize how old it was! Sorry!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by emmie View Post
      If you're hypothyroid, you aren't taking 'meds,' your Rx is actually thyroid hormones, replaces those your thyroid is not producing. Unless your hypo is caused by some temporary bodily disturbance (rare), no dietary adjustments will 'cure' you. Once you begin hormonal replacement, it is almost always for life because your body adjusts to the incoming hormones.
      Not true.

      Recovery of Pituitary Thyrotropic Function after Withdrawal of Prolonged Thyroid-Suppression Therapy, Apostolos G. Vagenakis, M.D, N Engl J Med 1975; 293:681-684October 2, 1975
      Recovery of Pituitary Thyrotropic Function after Withdrawal of Prolonged Thyroid-Suppression Therapy

      Detectable values of serum thyrotropin ( <1.2 μU per milliliter) and a normal 131I uptake usually occurred concurrently in two to three weeks. Serum thyroxine concentration returned to normal at least four weeks after hormone withdrawal.

      Also...

      Patterns of Recovery of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis in Patients Taken off Chronic Thyroid Therapy, LAWRENCE G. KRUGMAN, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Vol. 41, No. 1 70-80, 1975

      Patterns of Recovery of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis in Patients Taken off Chronic Thyroid Therapy

      In euthyroid non-goitrous patients, the mean duration of suppressed TSH response to TRH (maximum TSH < 8 U/ml) was 12 4 (SE) days after stopping thyroid hormone and the mean time to recovery of normal TSH response to TRH (maximum TSH > 8 U/ml) was 16 5 days. None of the euthyroid nongoitrous patients ever hyperresponded to TRH; normal at least four weeks after hormone withdrawal.

      Also you can look at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6806430 and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1418111/
      Last edited by ryanmercer; 10-30-2013, 04:14 AM.
      -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

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      • #18
        This seems almost too good to be true! So, it is possible to heal your body through drastic diet and lifestyle changes?? You don't know the hope this gives me!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by UpErMei View Post
          This seems almost too good to be true! So, it is possible to heal your body through drastic diet and lifestyle changes?? You don't know the hope this gives me!
          I'm still here! I think managing hypo-T depends mostly on if it's an auto-immune problem or a lifestyle problem. If you ask me, your main issues (hypothyroidism, PCOS, anxiety & depression) all point toward a 'leaky gut'. Work on getting your diet rock solid with enough carbs to fuel you, and avoid processed sugars, oils, and wheat like the plague! Eat lots of fermented foods, take a couple different probiotics, and a couple prebiotics. Even if this isn't your problem, it takes a huge chunk out of the equation--I know for me that getting my gut right was a huge step in the right direction.

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          • #20
            Okay Otzi, I will def look into this!

            I actually ferment my own kefir, so the probiotic part shouldn't be too hard.

            TY, I sincerely appreciate it!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by UpErMei View Post
              Okay Otzi, I will def look into this!

              I actually ferment my own kefir, so the probiotic part shouldn't be too hard.

              TY, I sincerely appreciate it!
              Just read this article, you may like it!

              The digestive tract and the brain are crucially linked, according to mounting evidence showing that diet and gut bacteria are able to influence our behavior, thoughts and mood. Now researchers have found evidence of bacterial translocation, or “leaky gut,” among people with depression.

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              • #22
                Is the lactic acid from fermented foods a problem with regard to thyroid? I generally like yogurt, kimchi, kefir, etc., though I was recently reading Ray Peat and some of his "followers" perspectives on thyroid, and there's some concern that it might be a bit of a problem for the liver, so that it may effect T4/T3 conversion. I've still been eating yogurt (even if it's "bad," I just like it too much), though a bit less than I used to. I did stop drinking kefir though.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by TheChokingGame View Post
                  Is the lactic acid from fermented foods a problem with regard to thyroid? I generally like yogurt, kimchi, kefir, etc., though I was recently reading Ray Peat and some of his "followers" perspectives on thyroid, and there's some concern that it might be a bit of a problem for the liver, so that it may effect T4/T3 conversion. I've still been eating yogurt (even if it's "bad," I just like it too much), though a bit less than I used to. I did stop drinking kefir though.
                  I may not be an expert like Ray Peat, but I cannot see any scenario where fermented foods would be bad, unless maybe that's all you ate. Daily or near-daily servings of fermented foods should be eaten by everyone. Kefir by the gallon, maybe not so great, but a glass of kefir and/or a daily yogurt is very good.

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