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Anyone out there read "The Vegetarian Myth"?

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  • #16
    1



    Funding organizations promoting Christian Science could help as well.

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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    • #17
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      But that would involve religion again. Not the best option in this case.

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      • #18
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        I think a place to start when we want to feed the planet is to look at the reasons that people aren't able to get enough to eat. Some areas are arid and cannot support their populations. However, it seems to me that a lot of the famines and general malnourishment find their cause in human evil and greed. For example, some of the poorest people in the world, Haitian peasants from the central plateau of Haiti became landless because their land was appropriated for a dam. They didn't even get electricity from the dam which was built to benefit the only the cream of the crop. And then there was some sort of pig disease so the U.S. had all their creole pigs killed and replaced with regular pigs, who basically couldn't flourish there. So all they were left with was hardly arable land and few animals, no wonder they have nothing to eat.

        I don't think the whole world could go primal, but I think that we can do a much better job supporting the population if we are willing to address injustice and war as a cause of malnutrition and global poverty. A lot of people are getting screwed over so a small global elite can enjoy a very comfortable lifestyle. The African kid in a village uses a whole lot less resources, with his garden, family cow, and cooking fire, than an American kid who fits into a whole social structure that requires foreign oil, cell phone minerals that have to be extracted in war zones, and all kinds of resource consumption.

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        • #19
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          I'm with ya, Robin. The causes of hunger and poverty weave a cloth that is hard to find the threads in. I believe culture is a huge factor in the well being of people. I break with my liberal friends, all cultures are not equal (in results.)


          Take the island of Hispanola. The western (I think) half is Haiti. Dirt poor as we all know, deforested, everyone is trying to leave. The other half is the Dominican Republic. Poor by our standards, but not shabby by third world standards. I've heard that the border between the two is stark; trees and no trees.


          So there is an island with the same land, the same climate, and two very different outcomes. Maybe it's because the DR makes all major league baseballs?

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          • #20
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            I've read the book. It is an important thing to read. I've been down the Primal road 2 years+, always evolving and growing. "The Vegetarian Myth" was an all-encompassing paradigm shift for me. I'll make it a point to re-read annually. I've loaned my copy out a fair bit. One of the most important successes I've had in converting people over to the Primal way of living, involved my 16 year old nephew reading "The Vegetarian Myth". He now possesses knowledge and the resolve to implement it for his lifetime. He's got a few other high school buddies heading down this path as well.


            THAT is where our future, the human races' future, lies. Getting this info out and getting it applied. "The Vegetarian Myth" is certainly THE single book to read if a person wants to understand the full import of the Primal way of life.

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            • #21
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              I wander how many vegetarians out there that had a chance to read that book. It must be very difficult to be open-minded to something that goes against all of your believes but which also makes so much sense.

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              • #22
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                Yeah, sort of like science and most religion.


                Hello, cognitive dissonance.

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                • #23
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                  That book should be a requirement in middle school...


                  People really don't know the road they're heading down, and that because so many are going in that direction, it affects us more knowledge seeking people too.

                  sigpic
                  In Pursuit of Healthiness, Only to Achieve Happiness!: www.livingnotsurviving.com

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                  • #24
                    1



                    I read it this weekend. I didn't want to put it down, but had to read it a little bit at a time. Lots of great stuff there: I was shocked to discover that the Middle East was once dense with topsoil & vegetation. I guess I thought it was always a desert, and that civilizations sprung out of the desert. It looks that way in the movies.


                    The chapter on nutrition was devastating. A lot of stuff is familiar, but there is very bad news for vegans. I have tried veganism, but never went more than a week or two without eating meat. Also, I fed one of my babies soy formula, which I sorely regret. I've been trying to get my wife to read some of the things I've been reading; the Nutritional Vegetarian chapter was one of the best short explanations of the detriments of a grain-based diet that I've seen. I'd settle for her just reading that one chapter.

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                    • #25
                      1



                      Just finished reading this book. I loved it. Lierre Keith is such a wonderful writer. The moral and political vegetarianism chapters are written with so much emotion and passion and the one on nutritional vegetarianism with a lot of scientific citation, is eye-opening.

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                      • #26
                        1



                        I have no yet read the book, but only because I can't find it. My local bookstore doesn't carry it. Although, I did have the pleasure of meeting Lierre at another talk where we got to talk about agriculture and some inter-related subjects. It wasn't until after I got home that I realised she was THAT Lierre Keith.

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