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  • Cleaning Dishes



    Ever since I've started cooking solely with animal fat every time I finish a meal my bowl (or plate) is covered in a fatty film. Even with soap this layer of leftover fat is very difficult to remove (impossible with water alone...), and since I do not like to use harsh cleaners, takes a lot of scrubbing. Has anyone else had experience with this and have some tips as to making this process quicker and less laborious?


  • #2
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    I use BioKleen dish soap - it purports to be better for the environment than the brand name soaps, and it works pretty well.

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    • #3
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      Justin:


      I was just marvelling myself yesterday about how exceptionally well-seasoned my saute pans were getting :-)


      I, too have noticed that my old dish soap from Whole Paycheck just wasn't cutting it. I had to upgrade to a grocery store brand with "super degreaser".


      I just don't use very much of it, and make sure the water is really, really hot.

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      • #4
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        I find a bit of vinegar goes a long way for degreasing!

        The more I see the less I know for sure.
        -John Lennon

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        • #5
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          I love a little borax in the dishwater - I just make sure to rinse the dish very well when I'm done.

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          • #6
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            I use biodegradable stuff from ecover and an Austrian brand called FROG. Both do their job really well.

            M

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            • #7
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              I have the same problem. My Dawn dish soap isn't cutting it... I will have to try the vinegar and maybe baking soda??

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              • #8
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                All soaps and detergents are biodegradable. Once upon a time the latter had lots of phosphorous, but that got the boot in the 1970's.


                Use the hottest water you have available. That alone will "cut" most greases.


                You may prefer an "alternative" detergent because for political reasons, or the raw ingredients, but once they head down the drain they are no better than the Proctor and Gamble ones.


                For me, the dishwasher does a great job! (They work more on having VERY hot water heated internally splashing for a long time than they do actual detergent action.) Not having one for many, many years I wallow in the luxury. Ditto laundry machines.

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                • #9
                  1



                  In my machine, often I get a film on certain silicon or plastic utensils. Everything else comes out clean. Just gonna experiment with other detergents. But, yes, this fatty film has been ever since the swap to tallow, lard for all my cooking. Love it. Gotta like a healthy saturated fat that is so resistant to volatile reactions and just stays, well, fat. Gotta be good for the cells in my body!

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                  • #10
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                    Lick them clean.

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                    • #11
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                      Or let your dog take care of it.

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                      • #12
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                        I second the doggies! I make my own hand/face creams & this is my trick in cleaning that greasy mess up. It even works with beeswax so it should do just fine with regular animal fat. Wipe with a dry paper towel or dry cloth towel first. Then don dish gloves (yes, this is important!) and use liquid AUTO dish detergent in the sink with very hot water (another reason for the gloves). I use Trader Joe's brand, too, not too expensive or smelly (I don't like smelly stuff).

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                        • #13
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                          Thanks for all the replies. Really hot water does do the trick. Amazing the difference between the two, because cold water does absolutely nothing.

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                          • #14
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                            My grandfather was a Chinese food cook. At the end of his workday, he would wash his wok with soap and hot water, and hang it on a hook to dry. He would leave any remaining remnants of animal fat on the pan to "season" it. He said the thin layer built up over the years added to the flavor of the food.

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                            • #15
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                              At my brother's house they call their dog "The Organic De-greaser" and she can clean baked-on egg off of a cast iron pan.

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