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Vitamin D and its benefits

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  • Vitamin D and its benefits



    I've been following Dr.William Davis' blog and he often emphasizes on the importance of Vitamin D for good health, as has Mark. I have never been tested for Serum Vit D level and other than cod-liver oil capsules that I have started taking only recently, I don't take any Vit D supplements. My question: How many of you have been tested for D levels in your blood and do you take any supplements to maintain the normal level? I would love to learn more. And have my mother, who is on statins, take them too. Thoughts and recommendations will be much appreciated.


    Dr.Davis' blog:

    http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/se...el/vitamin%20D


  • #2
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    http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/

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    • #3
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      Agnieszka had posted this link on another thread, but I'm posting it here again as a reference for all Vit D related articles:


      http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/...article672998/

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      • #4
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        Good move, Maba. It was taking over that other thread, which was meant to be broader (I'm afraid I inadvertently steered the conversation that way).

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        • #5
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          In the winter months I take cod liver oil (I live in Colorado) and the rest of the year I just take fish oil capsules and get outside for at least 20 minutes a day. With over 300 days of sunshine in Colorado it isn't hard to get Vitamin D. I think my daily multivitamin also has Vitamin D.


          I'm going to ask my doctor about the Vitamin D test when I go in for my annual physical exam next week.

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          • #6
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            Interesting that this would come up just about now. Just before flipping back to this forum I was over at WAPF and other sites to see what they had about Vitamin D and sunlight.


            Since I am now spending some hours on the beach every week, I wanted to inform myself about V.D., um, Vitamin D and the issues of melanomas, etc.


            First, I decided a month ago to go naked. Not genitalia, but sans sunscreen. Besides being expensive and a PITA to keep applied, there is that Grok spirit speaking to me.


            Before I tell you of an observation, I want to say that this is a perfect example of why it is SO hard for scientists and nutritionists to isolate specifics. Because of life circumstances, I definitely had a low level depression from ca. 2005-2007. Then when I moved to FL, essentially ripping up my life to place myself in terrible circumstances, the depression went into afterburner mode. It somewhat ameliorated late winter this year.


            Since I have been walking the beach frequently, I have done a one eighty. I have energy like I've not for 15 years, OK, losing 40 pounds is certainly a big component of that. But after reading all the stuff out there about Vitamin D, SAD (an ex-gf suffered from that), I can't help but wonder if the natural sunlight and the resulting Vitamin D hasn't been a natural Prozac.


            OK, I admit that the many almost naked bodies certainly helps the attitude!


            Here is some food for thought: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080107181411.htm


            Part of my thinking is that making Vitamin D via the sun obviously has major health benefits. Any downside like melanomas and cancers can be caught and arrested with decent dermatological care. BTW, I was a lifeguard for a few years way back when, so I'm guessing those were the truly damaging years.


            And let's not forget to follow the advice, "Follow the money." No one is putting dollars into the political/scientific process on behalf of El Sol.


            But seriously.......

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            • #7
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              OTB, come winter, I start feeling depressed and lethargic and my husband even joked that I might have SAD. It must be the lack of sunshine and as a result Vit D deficiency that was giving me the winter blues.

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              • #8
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                OTB,


                When I lived in Seattle, I needed a tanning bed once a week throughout each winter (there's a reason they drink so much coffee there).


                Now that I'm in San Francisco, it's not so bad, but when it's foggy, or in the winter, I need to spend more hours outside, or I go into a tailspin.


                You are certainly not alone.

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                • #9
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                  I've been getting monitored regularly and at my last blood draw for 25(OH)D, my level was 80. I'm taking 6000 IU of capsules and getting probably about 1000 from CLO. I've live in MA and am not getting outside a lot. OH- and when I do go outside, I do NOT wear sunscreen.

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                  • #10
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                    Ecala, that sounds exactly right based on what I've been reading. With the usual plus or minus caveat.


                    All I can say is that I am hooked. When I start covering up again in the fall, I'll ramp up the supplements.


                    I wonder if there isn't some other factor about great mental health being out of doors besides the vitamin D. That sunlight goes into our eyes and makes endorphins or THC or heroin, what the hell? I'm making that up, of course, but I will not be surprised that someday something is discovered. (You read it here first!) I mean, look at what we know about nutrition that we didn't thirty years ago, and I'm not even touching on the lipid, aka BS, theory of heart disease.


                    Also of interest I came across a well written piece about the alleged horrible rise in skin cancers. Well, not only did this rise start way before sunscreen, it tracks it perfectly. So, tongue in cheek, it could be said that sunscreen causes skin cancers!


                    What this paper pointed out is that over the years in the dermatology business there has been an upgrading (or is it downgrading?) of non-cancerous growth to melanoma. A better safe than sorry approach. This paper and others point out that there are way more dermatologists now than years ago, that there are way more skin screenings, that the customer base has shifted to young females because of cosmetic dermatology, and that the cancer rate for those girls has actually gone down!


                    One thing that caught my eye is that the dread melanomas usually appear in areas that sunlight does see a lot of. IIRC, white men on their back, white women, inside thights (???), and get this, blacks on the soles of their feet! Surely not too much sunlight there!


                    There is also the question of prior exposure leading to burning that triggers nasty things many years later. And growing up when the only reason to avoid burn was the pain, I had as much as any white boy.


                    Even though I am w/o health insurance, I want to have my skin checked. Years getting burned, years living and often working out of doors at high altitude could be a recipe for concern. My folk's dermatologist is great, but when indirectly I asked for a cost break because I have no insurance, it was no go. Also, maybe a "free" clinic, which I would be happy to donate considerably to instead of the doctor. We'll see.

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                    • #11
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                      [quote]

                      So, tongue in cheek, it could be said that sunscreen causes skin cancers!
                      </blockquote>


                      It most certainly does! That and the consumption of PUFAs. The PUFA in our skin becomes rancid from the heat of the sun (creates free radicals), combine that with the chemicals in the sunscreen-- makes a nasty cancer cocktail.

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                      • #12
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                        I just signed up for the Daction project:

                        http://www.grassrootshealth.net/


                        The Vit D test kit costs $40, I hope that that&#39;s cheaper than what it costs to get it done in a lab.

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                        • #13
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                          so ...I had mine checked in March and it was 51 (with a range of 32 - 100) - the test said Vitamin D-25 hydroxy (whatever that is) .. Does anyone know if I should supplement and if so, with what and how much ? I am getting about 1000 from CLO ???

                          PrimalMom
                          Check out my new blog at http://primalmom.blogspot.com

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                          • #14
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                            Wow, that&#39;s great Primalmom-- that you&#39;re only taking 1000 IU and your level is 51. You could stand to go up a bit if you wanted to - aim for between 60-80. You must be outside a lot?


                            Anyway, if I were you, I&#39;d add another 1000-2000 IU.


                            Here&#39;s a good article by the Vitamin D council:


                            http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/health/deficiency/am-i-vitamin-d-deficient.shtml


                            What We Recommend


                            If you use suntan parlors once a week or if you live in Florida and sunbathe once a week, year-round, do nothing. However, if you have little UVB exposure, my advice is as follows: healthy children under the age of 2 years should take 1,000 IU per day—over the age of 2, 2,000 IU per day. Well adults and adolescents should take 5,000 IU per day. Two months later have a 25-hydroxy-vitamin D blood test, either through ZRT or your doctor.


                            Start supplementing with the vitamin D before you have the blood test. Then adjust your dose so your 25(OH)D level is between 50–80 ng/ml, summer and winter. But remember, these are conservative dosage recommendations. Most people who avoid the sun—and virtually all dark-skinned people—will have to increase their dose once they find their blood level is still low, even after two months of the above dosage, especially in the winter. Some people may feel more comfortable ordering the blood test before they start adequate doses of vitamin D. We understand. Test as often as you feel the need to, just remember, no one can get toxic on the doses recommended above and some people will need even more.

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                            • #15
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                              Primalmom,

                              I&#39;ve heard multiple sources claim that ideal levels are 60-80. I got tested through Grassroots as well and was at 35. I live in the Upper Midwest so not the sunshine capital of the world, but I&#39;m outside a lot with exposed skin as a runner. Expected to be quite a bit higher.


                              I&#39;ve been supplementing with 4000 units/day of D3 and am due to be tested again in about a month.


                              http://www.uvadvantage.org/portals/0/pres/


                              A great link if you have time to listen.

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