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Another reason to breastfeed(nurse) (as if we needed one)

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  • Another reason to breastfeed(nurse) (as if we needed one)

    Googling brain and ketones and I came across this.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshel...chm&part=A2244

    Some very interesting stuff on brain metabolism but this really caught my eye:

    Significant utilization of ketone bodies by the brain is, however, normal in the neonatal period. The newborn infant tends to be hypoglycemic but becomes ketotic when it begins to nurse because of the high fat content of the mother's milk. When weaned onto the normal, relatively high-carbohydrate diet, the ketosis and cerebral ketone utilization disappear. Studies have been carried out mainly in the infant rat, but there is evidence that the situation is similar in the human infant.
    How interesting! So a breastfed baby is basically ketogenic... I'm curious to know what impact this could have on brain development. Obviously the 'perfect' nutrition profile is there, especially if the mother eats well... (that's another thing: what impact does the SAD have on mother's milk...) ...

    And whether the quote-unquote 'normal' glucose utilization is really a sort of adaptation to the neolithic diet? Maybe some brains don't make that adaptation so well... >childhood behavioral disorders?

  • #2
    Hey Helen,

    Human milk is high in sugar (lactose) and babies brains absolutely use glucose.

    Writing a longer post right now....

    K
    Last edited by cillakat; 05-24-2010, 08:37 AM. Reason: brevity



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    • #3
      That is very interesting,thanks for sharing. Unfortunately, neither of my girls took to breastfeeding after months of frustrating attempts and even failed attempts with lactation consultants (I think those damn consultants were making things worse by having so many rules attached to breastfeeding)
      I did pump breastmilk for them for 2 months though so atleast they got something. Still wish I could have done more but they are both completely healthy now!

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      • #4
        haha, cillakat, I actually tasted some of my expressed milk once and it did seem quite sweet...sweeter than cows milk.

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        • #5
          Feck!!!! I lost my long cited post and I just can't type it again.

          So here's this:
          Alrighty, the study cited referred to rats:
          "Studies have been carried out mainly in the infant rat,"

          Unfortunate comparison as rats are a cache species and humans are not. Rats and other animals that leave their young in nests while they go out for food, tend to have milk that is high in fat and protein to satiate the infant for longer periods of time.

          Human babies are not meant to be cached but rather to be continuously or nearly continuously in contact with the mother and have access to her breasts nearly all of the time. In traditional societies, nursing rates of 100x per day are not unusual. The baby eats small amounts as appetite, or other needs, dictate and the composition of our breastmilk reflects that.

          "but there is evidence that the situation is similar in the human infant."

          Yet they offer no cite and I am unable to find anything in 8 professional lactation texts. Brain damage due to insufficient glucose is a very real consideration in the neonate.

          This particular bulletin board is so frustrating - I'm constantly loosing posts while creating them.



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          • #6
            oh thanks, cillacat. That's bizarre - I saw the official-looking logo on the page and assumed it was a solid study. *duh* should know better by now. So much for THAT theory then. Wow I'm amazed that they should just toss off such a statement, what sort of science is that??? So now I'm suspicious about that whole article.

            Yes it's frustrating losing posts. What I do with long replies is copy the text I've written before I hit 'post'.

            Katie, I'm sorry to hear it didn't work out for you. It's one thing that I find awkward with nursing discussions, because I absolutely believe in breastfeeding and too many women still don't even want to do it, so it needs to be promoted, but I hate that it comes across as a criticism of those who can't.

            You're dead right about the nursing consultants. I had a lot of pain at one point and they were adamant that I shouldn't use a bottle or pacifier, but I ignored them because my body needed a break. And that worked better for me than trying to tough it out, and I was able to continue then with the occasional breaks allowing me to heal. They really are clueless I think. It's also difficult when the older generation is so uncomfortable with nursing.

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            • #7
              There was also something recently in the news that said breastfed babies were more likely to get proper satiety signals vs formula fed ones that implied formula fed babies may have trouble with their weight later on.

              I was a bottle fed baby, and have been heavy my entire life pretty much.

              Breastmilk is different for every woman though, I've made special order soaps for women wanting breastmilk soap and some women have very watery, "low fat" milk, while others have very heavily fatted milk. Even though my base recipe is the same when it comes to this type of soap, I get very different results depending on the womans supply.

              Probably more than you wanted to know. LOL!

              I remember one night, my eldest was home from the hospital, and she was so hungry, she kept trying and trying, as did I. Finally I begged my husband to make some formula. I remember sitting on the floor in her room giving her the bottle sobbing and feeling like a failure that I couldn't feed my baby. I vowed to never judge another woman when it comes to her decision to BF or bottle. We got over our hump, but I only nursed for about 8 months with each kif, and would indeed whip out a can of formula if I needed to.
              SW: 235
              CW:220
              Rough start due to major carb WD.

              MWF: 1 hour run/walk, 1.5 hours in the gym - upper/lower and core
              Sat/Sun=Yard/house work, chasing kids, playing
              Family walk every night instead of everyone vegging in front of the TV
              Personal trainer to build muscle mass & to help meet goals

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              • #8
                I had a friend who was killing herself to breastfeed, lactation consultants galore, pumping every two hours and dribbling milk through a tube while finger feeding - I asked another friend what worked for her, and she said nipple shields - it turned the boob into a bottle for the kiddo and worked like a charm. My own kids took to breastfeeding without a problem, but I swear every nurse had a different breastfeeding suggestion, and the next nurse would criticize me for using the previous nurse's suggestion.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Helen in Oz View Post
                  Katie, I'm sorry to hear it didn't work out for you. It's one thing that I find awkward with nursing discussions, because I absolutely believe in breastfeeding and too many women still don't even want to do it, so it needs to be promoted, but I hate that it comes across as a criticism of those who can't.
                  No worries, I never feel too bad about it anymore and I dont take these kind of posts as criticism. I just feel angry that I trusted nursing consultants to give me advice and they kept saying that "the baby has to latch like this" or "the baby should have their mouth like that" or "nope, take her off and try again". Only later did I realize, WTF do they know? I should have trusted that my BABY would know how to get nourishment but was convinced we somehow weren't "doing it right". In all fairness though my girls had like zero sucking reflex, and had a weird thing going on where they would stick their tongues to the roof of their mouths and even feeding them bottles was a chore and a half and took f o r e v e r. So, I dunno. I did the best I could do given the situation, maybe if I didn't have such bad advice it would have gone better but not likely. anyway, end rant now....

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                  • #10
                    A lot of lactation research is coming back around to a "let the baby figure it out" way of thinking:

                    http://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/bfinfo/bla.html
                    My homeschooling mom, doula blog: http://naturalparentingsupport.blogspot.com

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