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  • high does of Vit D maybe not so good

    Students of the "if-a-little-is-good-a-lot-must-be-better" school might want to look hard at the latest vitamin D study in this week's JAMA.
    Taking huge amounts of vitamin D might not be the greatest idea.
    Researchers at the University of Melbourne found that giving annual megadoses of vitamin D to elderly women with brittle bones may have actually increased the women's rate of falls and bone fractures, instead of reducing their risk as the researchers had hoped.

    Now, these were very big doses of the sunshine vitamin 500,000 IU spread across ten days, once a year for four years. That's more than 600 times the daily dose of 700 to 800 that's been shown in earlier studies to decrease fracture risk by up to 25 percent.

    Why, you might ask, would doctors even think about giving patients such huge vitamin doses?

    As Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, a long-time bone researcher at Tufts University who wrote an editorial about the work in the same issue of JAMA, says it's quite common for doctors to kickstart their patients who are low on vitamin D with 50,000 IU twice a week for six to eight weeks.

    The University of Melbourne's Kerrie Sanders and colleagues say they were motivated to try even bigger doses because it's hard to get people to stick with with a daily regimen of pills. They also knew from other work that fat-soluble vitamin D is stored in the body for long periods, and released a little at a time.

    Giving a megadose in autumn, they figured, would help boost the women's blood levels to a good range throughout the dark days of winter when vitamin D levels typically dip. And there was no reason, they say, to think it would hurt the women's blood levels, even at the peak was much lower than toxic levels.

    But after several years, women in high-dose vitamin D group had 15 percent more falls, and 26 percent more fractures than women who swallowed dummy pills instead.

    Why that would happen is still far from clear, but at least one other similar study has shown the same result. Both Sanders and Dawson-Hughes are still optimistic that vitamin D, given in lower daily doses, can help build bones. But the effect of very high doses, Sanders says, warrants further study

  • #2
    Well of course they had more falls. if i take more than 10000IU at a time it's like I just dropped a candy flip. Those are practically psychedelic doses!

    Anyway when in doubt replicate that found in nature. We can produce 15000IU a day so maybe that's a good cap. More than 10000IU at a time under normal circumstances is probably excessive.
    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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    • #3
      Reading the title of this post, I was a little worried about my 2-4000 IU daily dose might be too much. 500,000? Wow. To me that's like drinking a case of red wine in one sitting because one glass a day is supposed to be good for you.

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      • #4
        Wow!!! sounds like a major experiment to me......you know they do that kind of stuff to people...

        Annie

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        • #5
          Seriously. This is the most *ridiculous* study D evah.



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          • #6
            During flu season, I took 10K units/day. Now that it's spring, reduced to 5K. I thought I was being radical ;-)

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            • #7
              Wow that's a lot of vit D in one sitting. I live in FL Don't have to worry about popping pills.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by venam View Post
                Wow that's a lot of vit D in one sitting. I live in FL Don't have to worry about popping pills.
                I live in San Diego... and my vitamin D was bottomed out. :-)

                Just sayin'... without checking nobody really knows what their levels are.
                sigpic "Boy I got vision and the rest of the world is wearing bifocals" - Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Minxxa View Post
                  I live in San Diego... and my vitamin D was bottomed out. :-)

                  Just sayin'... without checking nobody really knows what their levels are.
                  So true. Very nice to hear someone else say it for a change



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                  • #10
                    Alright alright, I will check my levels next time I visit my doctor's office.

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                    • #11
                      I read something somewhere (sorry!) about vit d having such a strong affinity for calcium that if you are not consuming enough calcium for the amt of vit d you are taking that the d could pull calcium out of your bones. Not sure that that's what's going on here, but it makes sense that it's something like that.
                      Adding minerals wherever I can.

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                      • #12
                        It's more complicated than that and my fingers already hurt from typing too much but no, that's not it.

                        We do need sufficient calcium, magnesium, zinc and A to work in concert with D but calcium needs are MUCH lower with vitamin D sufficient persons.

                        It's just their ridiculous dosing scheules. There's recent evidence that falling D levels are as dangerous as low D levels and they've got those folks on just about a continuos fall. It's just lazy, bad science with little regard for the backdata.



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                        • #13
                          Also important to keep in mind that the prescription dose of 50,000 IU is actually D2, not D3, as any human should probably be taking. However, it is standard practice to treat D deficiency with 50,000 IU (prescription D2) once a week for 10-12 weeks.

                          Yes, silly.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Bisous View Post
                            Also important to keep in mind that the prescription dose of 50,000 IU is actually D2, not D3,
                            Both are now available. I've not seen anyone receive a D2 prescription in the last 2 years though before that it was standard practice. Not saying it's not done, because I'm sure it is, but more and more docs are getting better information about D and are acting on it.



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                            • #15
                              According to heart scan blog, while D3 is available, it is a toss up as to whether or not you will get it from the pharmacy. Even if the doctor writes D3 which she may or may not. I still see pcps order the most useless test in the world, T4 (not free T4) all the time. I'd say they order that more often than fT4. It's beside the point. I'll have to go back to JAMA and look at the study again. Okay, my bad. I was wrong. Looking at the study right now - they used cholecalciferol. d3. 50,000 daily for 10 days is so wild and crazy, though. Why not stretch it out to 50,000 per week which is more standard?
                              Last edited by Bisous; 06-08-2010, 07:35 AM.

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