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We now have little self control over our binge eating, study says

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  • We now have little self control over our binge eating, study says

    Anyone seen this news story, referring to some recent research?

    We have little control over our desire to binge on delicious food, says study | Learning The Steel

    Any thoughts?

  • #2
    How much of a role did self-control play in your Primal journey? How much of a role does discipline play for you?

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    • #3
      I bet they have a new drug to treat this "disorder".
      Randal
      AKA: Texas Grok

      Originally posted by texas.grok
      Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
      http://hardcoremind.com/

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      • #4
        It may be somewhat true with the psychotic frankenfoods we're having foisted upon us by CW, but once those go out the door into the dumpster I find it easy to maintain control.
        Eat like a Beast, feel like a Beast!
        Eat from a huge bag of processed junk... Well... You know.

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        • #5
          I agree. Once I changed my mindset about what is "food" and what is "not food" , and then spent some time feeling great eating this way, now I don't even feel like it takes discipline at all, it's just the way I eat. Some level of vigilance or self-monitoring is still necessary but it's not hard, certainly not impossible to resist temptation.
          Annie Ups the Ante
          http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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          • #6
            once those go out the door into the dumpster I find it easy to maintain control.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ConnorBryant View Post
              No, I hadn't.

              Any thoughts?
              Russian dolls.

              What I mean is this is something inside something inside something ... and so on.

              Your link is to a blog called "Learning The Steel". That links to an article in The Vancouver Sun. That Sun in its turn is reporting a news item syndicated from:

              BY CHERRILL HICKS, LONDON DAILY TELEGRAPH
              I suppose if i found the article in the Telegraph (link not given by the Sun) I might perhaps find a link to the original paper.

              But, to be frank, this is fairly familiar stuff and I can't be bothered.

              OK. Let's work with the Vancouver Sun -- since that's what we have.

              Scientists no longer blame greed or lack of self-control for tendency to binge on high-fat, high-sugar foods. Rather, the urge to finish off those Pringles is now thought to be due to hedonic hunger, a powerful physiological response over which we have little control.
              It's very blustering and important-sounding, but does it say a lot? "Binge" is very dramatic. But how many people really do "binge"? Does anyone really know? Then we get:

              high-fat, high-sugar foods
              But is the problem "high-fat, high-sugar foods"? Or might it be high-fat foods? Or "high-sugar foods? Or is it something else again?

              Did they properly control whatever experiment they actually carried out for such variables? .... or did they jump to conclusions (or simply get on with peddling a pet theory)? We never learn. And the Vancouver Sun is not asking. It's filling column inches, and it simply doesn't care.

              Let's pass on:

              Experts believe there are two drivers behind what and how much we eat.

              The first, the homeostatic system, regulates appetite according to the body's need for energy. Homeostasis is controlled by communication between the brain and the digestive system so when we are in an energy deficit we get signals such as shakiness (caused by low blood-sugar levels), stomach rumbles and hunger pangs.
              Oh ... "experts".

              That's dubious. Gary Taubes, who has more of a background in science (and philosophy of science) than most *cough* "obesity researchers" would certainly give you an argument on that. Sometimes people are specialised to the point where they "can't see the wood for the trees" ... besides being invested in particular theories.

              And now we'll proceed further:

              But the second driver, hedonic hunger, can override the former. It is defined as a physiological response, involving the brain's "reward centres" to smelling, seeing and thinking about certain foods.
              So now we have a word for it. "Hedonic hunger". So it must be so.

              But, at bottom, what's still sitting behind this is the so-called "bank account model" of eating. What they're, in effect, saying is that people are overweight purely and simply because they eat too damn much. The only difference is that they've re-assigned the "blame" from the individual to the food manufacturer.

              Well, yeah, maybe ... I've very little time for food manufacturers. I'd take a pretty dim view of them for other reasons even if I knew incontrovertibly this theory was a load of rubbish. But the truth is the truth, and it matters.

              I think there may be something in this (already very familiar) theory. But even if there is how much it matters ...

              I think obesity may mostly be down to what you eat, not "how much". In short, I think the low-carb explanation may well be the right one. I don't tend to eat particularly low-carb myself, mostly because I can't be bothered. Maybe that's why my waistline has started expanding again. LOL. In short ...

              Take note of what Taubes is up to.

              Watch this space.

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              • #8
                A load of crap. Just another excuse to make a pill to control the so called uncontrollable urge and blame it all on the big bad food companies.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Agreed Agreed.

                  The finding of something called "hedonic hunger" is nice. But of limited use.
                  Giving a set of symptoms a label and thus making it into an actual "thing" is useful for diagnostics and further research etc...but it can artificially inflate the importance of what it is....

                  My main problem with the article is that it doesn't peel back the layers enough.
                  Despite the new terms of hedonic hunger, the reasons for eating for pleasure etc.... it still all comes down to willpower and discipline in the end, in the first instance to get started on good eating.

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                  • #10
                    good. once those go out the door into the dumpster I find it easy to maintain control.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Once what goes out the door??

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                      • #12
                        This doesn't sound like anything new to me (or most of you, I'm sure).

                        Meilissa and Dallas Hartwick do a pretty good job of explaining it in their book It Starts with Food. They discuss the difference between a craving and hunger - you know, real hunger. A craving continues, even after you've eaten half the bag of chips, or two rows of Oreos, because your brain is bombarded by these super flavor rich foods, which have zero nutritional value, so your brain wants more and your body still needs food, because it's nutritionally starving. On the other hand, when you eat quality real foods you become satiated. In other words, while you're eating the steak, your desire for it decreases until you are done. Food companies pay big money to develop and market these addicting foods. It is real, and it is a science, and there are big dollars at stake.

                        So, it does takes willpower and can be quite a struggle for many people to break free, however, it is also absolutely possible, and frankly absolutely necessary. We can choose to be victims or choose to be in control. Sometimes you just need to power through.
                        Of course, there has to be a light bulb moment, and most never get to that point.

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                        • #13
                          Absolutely true. The distinction between cravings and hunger is a useful one methinks.
                          The powering through is the problem I think.
                          That's why I think this book is useful;
                          BOOKS for LEARNING THE STEEL | Learning The Steel
                          For many people even the lightbulb moment isn't enough. Knowing doesn't always equal doing.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ConnorBryant View Post
                            Absolutely true. The distinction between cravings and hunger is a useful one methinks.
                            The powering through is the problem I think.
                            That's why I think this book is useful;
                            BOOKS for LEARNING THE STEEL | Learning The Steel
                            For many people even the lightbulb moment isn't enough. Knowing doesn't always equal doing.
                            You're absolutely right, powering through is the problem, and most people won't/can't/don't have the true desire to do it. The light bulb moment comes after you've powered through and you physically feel different, and have hopefully dealt with some of your personal psychological food issues.

                            Even if you do get to that point, unless you've made a full commitment to a lifestyle change, the food culture that has become SAD will often lure you back in.

                            It makes me sad, because we are constantly bombarded by unhealthy food messages and temptations, making this an uphill climb. On the other hand, we know it can be done, and it gets so much easier with time.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks for the input AppleGirl.
                              It's nice to see someone who understands that the struggle is very real despite having the right information.
                              When I started years ago, long before there were websites, even books about paleo and everything related, it was rough. And somehow it was even rougher because I KNEW what I could be and should be doing but wasn't.

                              Having the information, the knowledge of what I should be doing, made it even harder for me in many ways, not easier.
                              And since I've been researching discipline and willpower I've found exactly the same with people I work with.
                              (Of course they are a special cross section because by definition the people are work with are people who are struggling with self-control, willpower etc.)

                              Many people in this community seem to have a relatively easy transition once they find the correct information about diet. That's awesome for them. But not everyone's reality.

                              Like you say,
                              The lightbulb moment for many doesn't really come until AFTER they've pushed through with a lot of willpower, discipline, falling down and getting back up again.

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