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Einkorn, the original Wheat - OK for Celiacs?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Kochin View Post
    Einkorn is good, but contains more allergens than spelt. When I have grain in any amount it's usually spelt, due to availability and the fact it causes no harm to me at all.

    HOWEVER, for coeliacs neither may be good enough. Both still contain gluten. Best avoided if you're especially intolerant or truly allergic.
    Do you have a link (reference) to allergens in Einkorn? I hadn't heard of that before.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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    • #32
      Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
      I used to grind fresh sprouted rye in a blender. It's soft and doesn't require a mill. Of course, at that point I added wheat flour, because sprouted rye in itself didn't have enough gluten to make a proper loaf of bread. Those were the days.
      I was thinking about the middle ages last night. In the mediteranean area spelt and landrace emmer probably, but in the more northern areas, other than what was brought in, the bread must have been rye. I suppose there are hybred versions of rye also. What was the original rye? While in the Czech Republic I had the best rye bread I've ever eaten. So good I couldn't have imagined it. That was about 17 years ago. It's probably changed now.

      And then the northern Scandinavian areas. The did have large ruminants, I think, which had to eat something. They had mammoths. Were there any grains up there?
      Last edited by Cryptocode; 07-03-2013, 01:12 PM.
      "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Cryptocode View Post
        Hi Forager, what is Essene bread. I've never heard of it. Didn't the Essenes eat the yeast free flat bread? In any case, the Essene community (if we're on the same page) lived just prior to the time of Jesus, around 100 - 0 B.C. I think they would have been eating emmer or one of the landrace slightly modified emmers common in that area of the middle east.
        Essene is unleavened bread you can buy at health food (may not be available at WF) stores, I think it's usually frozen. Here's a link:Sprouted bread - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
        Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
          I'd take the sourdough route. It's the only bread I've ever truly loved. After I get the flour (which, as it will be preground is likely rancid), I'll take some time to make my starter. Likely, if all goes well I'll distribute loafs to my grain-eating compadres, as it'll be better for them than whatever they're using now I'd guess. Also, my SO likes sourdough.

          M.
          I never thought of flour in my pantry going rancid. I googled this and the answer was 1) if it's a year old it's rancid, 2) it tastes sour and 3) Protecting against rancidity — which occurs when oils oxidize — has long been a challenge for home cooks, but a recent perfect stew of factors has made the issue more serious. Strangely enough, this situation comes courtesy of the rising popularity of "healthy" polyunsaturated fats, whole grain flours and warehouse stores — not bad developments on their own, but taken together they've resulted in American pantries full of food that goes rancid much faster than we're used to.

          Shows what I know. I thought only flour in large open bin storage on ships crossing the ocean went rancid when it became infested with bole weevils. I'll taste my bread and all-purpose flour now before I use it. It's probably all rancid.

          This may end my baking for life. Milling is bad and no way am I going to stone grind anything by hand.
          Last edited by Cryptocode; 07-03-2013, 01:39 PM.
          "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Urban Forager View Post
            Essene is unleavened bread you can buy at health food (may not be available at WF) stores, I think it's usually frozen. Here's a link:Sprouted bread - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
            That's hilarious. Angel of water, etc. So they ate sprouted rye and (landrace) emmer, sun baked. LOL. It sounds awful but the pictures make it look pretty good. I have to go look for some. First I have to find a health food store in the area. The last one closed years ago.

            So, by the year 0 not only had emmer moved north, but rye had moved south.
            Last edited by Cryptocode; 07-03-2013, 01:41 PM.
            "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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            • #36
              I used to make sprouted rye bread naturally leavened. I would soak the rye overnight and save the liquid. The liquid would ferment for a day before I put it in the refrigerator as I sprouted the rye. Then I would put the sprouted rye through the blender with the fermented liquid, add enough flour to make a dough, add salt, and let it rise. For the second rise I packed it into a loaf pan. If you were to save a piece of dough for the next loaf, rising would be faster. It took probably a day and a half to rise before baking.

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              • #37
                Did it look like any of the pictures in Forager's link?
                "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                • #38
                  I was just at the local health food store and I heard one young women say to her friend "have you ever had Essene bread? It's so delicious!" I hadn't even thought of that bread in years until today and then someone mentions it, funny how that happens. And btw it is NOT delicious! This is the brand that's sold at my local store, they apparently have gluten free. Still I wouldn't eat it.
                  Sprouted Bread, Manna Bread, Yeast free bread, organic bread -- Manna Organics
                  Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Urban Forager View Post
                    I was just at the local health food store and I heard one young women say to her friend "have you ever had Essene bread? It's so delicious!" I hadn't even thought of that bread in years until today and then someone mentions it, funny how that happens. And btw it is NOT delicious! This is the brand that's sold at my local store, they apparently have gluten free. Still I wouldn't eat it.
                    Sprouted Bread, Manna Bread, Yeast free bread, organic bread -- Manna Organics
                    I believe you. I won't get any Essene bread, even for my husband who wouldn't like it either. But baking bread in the sun has got to be the epitomy of slow-cooking.
                    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Wildrose View Post
                      I just wonder, why bother? It's probably quite expensive and regular gluten free bread, made with things like potato starch, is everywhere.
                      Most gluten free bread doesn't taste that great, but even if it does it's full of high sugar ingredients. I haven't read the entire thread, but Einkorn is a better alternative to GF, IMHO, and it is not the frankenwheat that modern what is. Spelt is okay too, but I'm not confident it isn't becoming modified in some way unless it is labeled non-GMO.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Karan View Post
                        Most gluten free bread doesn't taste that great, but even if it does it's full of high sugar ingredients. I haven't read the entire thread, but Einkorn is a better alternative to GF, IMHO, and it is not the frankenwheat that modern what is. Spelt is okay too, but I'm not confident it isn't becoming modified in some way unless it is labeled non-GMO.
                        Do read the complete thread and you will see that gluten-free is not the issue.

                        BTW the Bible says that God told Moses that mankind would have a lifespan of 120 years. Moses lived 120 years and died with good eye-sight and "his moisture" (performed well in bed). Plato also live 120 years. They were only a little over a century apart and both ate emmer bread I suppose, although it could have been einkorn in Moses' case.
                        "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                        • #42
                          Er, no. Firstly, Plato was about 80. Second, assuming Moses existed, at all, the two are separated by around nine hundred years.

                          M.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
                            Er, no. Firstly, Plato was about 80. Second, assuming Moses existed, at all, the two are separated by around nine hundred years.

                            M.
                            Wikipedia says you're right, MEversbergII; but older literature says 120 years. Not that I place real belief in either.

                            900 years is about a century, close enough.
                            "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                            • #44
                              This thread should not be in a section titled Research.

                              900 years is 9 centuries
                              Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                              Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Cryptocode View Post
                                Wikipedia says you're right, MEversbergII; but older literature says 120 years. Not that I place real belief in either.

                                900 years is about a century, close enough.
                                I've never read anything that's put him at 120 years. Possibly said older literature was mistaken, or perhaps used a different means of calculating time, which yields in skewed years.

                                Century contains the Latin part "cent", which itself means 100. Percent being per 100 and all.

                                What's your native language? Hablas espaņol?

                                M.

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