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Einkorn, the original Wheat - OK for Celiacs?

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  • #16
    Cryptocode, cheers.

    You guys are having a negative influence on my dietary decisions D: (I kid) I'll see what's at my local health food store next Friday.

    M.

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    • #17
      LOL, I hope not. But I really appreciate your offer and am most curious as to how the baking effort turns out.
      "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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      • #18
        Einkorn is like most plants in that it is a diploid meaning it contains 2 sets of chromosomes. About 2,000 years after einkorn wheat, emmer wheat was created by the hybridization of 2 wild grasses. Consequently, emmer has 4 sets of chromosomes. Kamut and Durum wheat are both descendents of emmer.

        Spelt is the result of hybridization between cultivated emmer and another wild grass and so contains six sets of chromosomes. Modern wheat is a descendent of spelt.

        Note that while extensive hybridization of wheat has occurred over the millenia, there is currently no genetically modified wheat on the market.

        As you can see, einkorn is the purest and most ancient form of wheat available as it only has 2 sets of chromosomes and is naturally very low in gluten!
        The 4 Reasons Why I’m Switching to Einkorn Wheat

        Here you can buy already baked Einkorn bread (but it has maple syrup in it), or bread mix. The flour is not stone-ground though. The loaf of bread looks great and it has clearly risin sufficiently.
        Einkorn

        An n=1 experiment http://pathsofwrighteousness.wordpre...ad-experiment/

        Lots of Einkorn recipes http://pinterest.com/skinwellness/starch-einkorn-wheat/

        Sprouting Einkorn berries http://politicallyincorrecthealth.co...wheat-berries/. That doesn't look too bad. But now there's no way to have it stone-ground. And I'm sure not going to do it by hand.

        Sourdough baker, it's interesting the way people find their calling in life: http://politicallyincorrecthealth.co...wheat-berries/, http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/326...rain-sourdough
        Last edited by Cryptocode; 06-29-2013, 12:59 PM.
        "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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        • #19
          I'd take the sourdough route. It's the only bread I've ever truly loved. After I get the flour (which, as it will be preground is likely rancid), I'll take some time to make my starter. Likely, if all goes well I'll distribute loafs to my grain-eating compadres, as it'll be better for them than whatever they're using now I'd guess. Also, my SO likes sourdough.

          Good point on Spelt -> Modern wheat. Spelt was what the Roman Empire brought with them as they moved north, which displaced Gaulish rye if I'm not mistaken. Still sketchy on that. I wonder what Egypt was growing during the latter years of the republic - they provided most of the grain. I remember millet was still consumed by the poor still.

          M.

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          • #20
            Interesting. Egypt did a lot of trading all around the mediterranean, so maybe they ate what the Romans did, and traded it to them. Or maybe Rome got some from the middle east where they grew emmer.

            Yesterday at the grocery store I picked up a loaf of ciabatta bread for my husband. When I got home and was moving it to an airtight bag I read the label. It's about 50% whole wheat and 50% spelt. Amazing. Someone's paying attention. At the bottom of the label where they give warnings for allergens it says "contains Wheat'. Maybe that part is getting common now.
            Last edited by Cryptocode; 07-01-2013, 09:28 PM.
            "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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            • #21
              I just wonder, why bother? It's probably quite expensive and regular gluten free bread, made with things like potato starch, is everywhere.
              Out of context quote for the day:

              Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Cryptocode View Post
                Yesterday at the grocery store I picked up a loaf of ciabatta bread for my husband. When I got home and was moving it to an airtight bag I read the label. It's about 50% whole wheat and 50% spelt. Amazing. Someone's paying attention. At the bottom of the label where they give warnings for allergens it says "contains Wheat'. Maybe that part is getting common now.
                Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (Public Law 108-282, Title II)

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                • #23
                  Ah, yes. I haven't been reading many labels lately because I don't eat those kinds of foods.
                  "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Wildrose View Post
                    I just wonder, why bother? It's probably quite expensive and regular gluten free bread, made with things like potato starch, is everywhere.
                    From what I've read, gluten-free is bad stuff. Anyway this is not for our food. It's an experiment to see, for me, how it bakes and tastes. It's interesting to me because it's the original grain and if the paleolithics ate any grains ( when they otherwise had no food sources and were starving) this is what they would have eaten.
                    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
                      I'd take the sourdough route. It's the only bread I've ever truly loved. After I get the flour (which, as it will be preground is likely rancid), I'll take some time to make my starter. Likely, if all goes well I'll distribute loafs to my grain-eating compadres, as it'll be better for them than whatever they're using now I'd guess. Also, my SO likes sourdough.

                      Good point on Spelt -> Modern wheat. Spelt was what the Roman Empire brought with them as they moved north, which displaced Gaulish rye if I'm not mistaken. Still sketchy on that. I wonder what Egypt was growing during the latter years of the republic - they provided most of the grain. I remember millet was still consumed by the poor still.

                      M.
                      When you make the sourdough starter, will you tell me exactly what you did. I've never done that from scratch before.

                      I'm currently watching on the of those Great Books courses on the Early, High and Late Middle ages. He hardly mentions food or diet at all. Bummer.
                      "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                      • #26
                        Not seen that Crypto: Guessing it focuses on the "high" parts, like Big Names and Great Events? Those are nea, but my primary moves into historical study has been hoplology and anthropology so I feel you there. Too many documentaries / books completely omit things beyond pottage and bread, so you kind of have to piece it together from disparate sources. For a humorous bit of middle ages stuff, check out Terry Jone's Medieval Life.

                        I'll keep you posted on the starter making. This will be my first time as well, but I've gotten some simple instructions from NourishedKitchen. Great site dedicated to traditional foods, got plenty of Primal/Paleo friendly stuff.

                        M.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Cryptocode View Post
                          From what I've read, gluten-free is bad stuff. Anyway this is not for our food. It's an experiment to see, for me, how it bakes and tastes. It's interesting to me because it's the original grain and if the paleolithics ate any grains ( when they otherwise had no food sources and were starving) this is what they would have eaten.
                          Gluten-free is bad because it's basically empty calories, but even ancient wheat wouldn't be much better on that score. But if it's for science, have fun.
                          Out of context quote for the day:

                          Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I just noticed this thread. My husband is very interested in anthropology, about 17 yrs ago (I can't believe it's been that long!) he grew einkorn and made it into bread using a wild yeast sourdough starter. I just asked him to remind me what it was like (my memory isn't so good) he said it was sort of like Essene bread. He also told me he grew some last year and has it stored in the garage. Hubby is a storehouse of ancient technology, he can flint knap, hunt with a blowgun, forge knives, use a drop spindle, many other things too numerous to list and he loves growing ancient varieties of veggies. Though lately he's been focusing on growing foods we actually want to eat because some of those old varieties don't taste good not to mention the fact that grains and legumes are no longer part of our diet.
                            Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Wildrose View Post
                              Gluten-free is bad because it's basically empty calories, but even ancient wheat wouldn't be much better on that score. But if it's for science, have fun.
                              Also because of all the crap they add to replace the gluten. But basically the gluten-free bread still has all the disadvantages of the long-chain hybridized or GMO grain.
                              "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Urban Forager View Post
                                I just noticed this thread. My husband is very interested in anthropology, about 17 yrs ago (I can't believe it's been that long!) he grew einkorn and made it into bread using a wild yeast sourdough starter. I just asked him to remind me what it was like (my memory isn't so good) he said it was sort of like Essene bread. He also told me he grew some last year and has it stored in the garage. Hubby is a storehouse of ancient technology, he can flint knap, hunt with a blowgun, forge knives, use a drop spindle, many other things too numerous to list and he loves growing ancient varieties of veggies. Though lately he's been focusing on growing foods we actually want to eat because some of those old varieties don't taste good not to mention the fact that grains and legumes are no longer part of our diet.
                                Hi Forager, what is Essene bread. I've never heard of it. Didn't the Essenes eat the yeast free flat bread? In any case, the Essene community (if we're on the same page) lived just prior to the time of Jesus, around 100 - 0 B.C. I think they would have been eating emmer or one of the landrace slightly modified emmers common in that area of the middle east.

                                Your husband sounds like a valuable storehouse of knowledge. We have an old set of the Firefox books but even they don't go into foods and their preparation much.
                                Last edited by Cryptocode; 07-03-2013, 01:16 PM.
                                "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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