Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ask a biochemist.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    1



    Not sure if this is a chemistry question but how I can I tell a quality multivitamin and fish oil supplement from junk ones?

    Comment


    • #47
      1



      Hi I got a question..


      Where do you stand in the "only meat" debate, is is true that the nutrients veggies have reside in the fiber so therefore can not be absorbed by the body?


      And also, how does a week looks like for you? in terms of PB lifestyle.


      Thanks in advance.

      Comment


      • #48
        1



        Stabby: Cooking Indian as often as I do, I usually use the cinnamon and turmeric together


        MG, this might be too general, but what would you say are the most important basic facts of biochem/endocrinology that a person should keep in mind in order to avoid being bamboozled by nutritionists and dieticians?

        Comment


        • #49
          1



          Could be good in a stir-fry. I didn't enjoy the turmeric-white tea though

          Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

          Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

          Comment


          • #50
            1



            Wow, this is so good!


            Thanks, Grokologist. So, having about two reasonable-sized insulin spikes a week (or so) actually is probably a good thing!


            Another?


            Suppose I want to improve my Vitamin D status in the Oregon winter, while having some cod liver oil and eating liver a couple of times a week so that I don't deplete Vitamin A (which is needed to absorb protein, right?) And suppose I want to keep a moderate, non-extreme tan going so that in the spring I can go out in the sunshine without as long as adjustment time ... but also suppose I don't want a lot of UVA, which reaches deep into the skin, so a few places have said, and also makes only a temporary tan compared to UVB.


            If I get a UVB light with a narrow spectrum, which are formulated for psoriasis sufferers, will that still be able to make Vitamin D and a tan? And might it be some help with keratosis pilaris, which I finally find out is what has made those little skin bumps since I was a kid, only I never knew what to call it or what to do about it? And I was apparently supposed to get over it at about age 30, but here I am in my 60's and still have a little on my lower arms ...


            <thanks again>

            Comment


            • #51
              1



              P.S. -- Always thinking of one other thing to ask ...


              Could poor Vitamin D status account for why I&#39;m having trouble mending knee cartilage? Calcium needed for cartilage, right?

              Comment


              • #52
                1



                What&#39;s your opinion on the glycemic index? Does it really make a difference? There is as much difference between pure glucose and sucrose than there is between sucrose and an apple. That doesn&#39;t seem to be much of an improvement in severity of the glucose spike and I reckon that with that example, most of a 500 calories rice/lentils meal would end up being converted to trigs and all of that other wonderful junk. But lots of people, including Robert Lustig seem to be low-gi fiber-lauders

                Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

                Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

                Comment


                • #53
                  1



                  Thanks for the great thread and contributing posts MG.


                  You noted that IF can help to improve insulin sensitivity. Would the same be true for leptin sensitivity?


                  Are there other ways to improve insulin and leptin sensitivity besides IF (or low carb diet)? I think you may have mentioned intermittent insulin spikes ... what about leptin spikes?


                  AdvThanks.

                  “It is a truism that almost any sect, cult, or religion will legislate its creeds into law if it acquires the political power to do so, and will follow it by suppressing opposition, subverting all education to seize early the minds of the young, and by killing, locking up, or driving underground all heretics.”
                  —Robert A. Heinlein

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    1



                    ONE QUESTION:


                    Female, 24 years old, lost my period due to an eating disorder at 19 and haven&#39;t had one since. was a zero-carber for a year and turned to PB in January...


                    anything you know about fertility outside the obvious "eat a ton"? anything i should stay away from or anything i should make sure i get?


                    this means a lot so thank you ahead of time <3

                    Get on my Level
                    http://malpaz.wordpress.com/

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      1



                      Thanks for the opportunity to ask questions! I have two that have been nagging at me:


                      1. There used to be a photograph (which I can&#39;t find) on the old Dean Ornish website that showed an artery after a very low fat, high carb meal, next to a photo of the same artery after a high fat meal. The photo was colorful with yellow, red, other colors. The result was that the low fat meal created a wide open artery with clear blood flow, and the fatty meal showed an artery that was very clogged-up looking, inflammed, narrowed.... I wonder if you&#39;ve ever seen this famous photo or one like it. How can we eat our high protein and fat meals and not worry about our arteries looking like the bad one in these comparison pics?


                      2. I also wonder about the fact that in Asia, where they eat a fairly high carb diet, people have traditionally been so lean, with low rates of heart disease and cancers. Lots of white rice, some veggies and fish, monosaturated fats. Even people with low activity levels still remained lean and healthy as long as they adhered to this traditional diet and avoided the Western "SAD" diet. This seams to suggest that there are multiple ways to achieve a low-steady-state insulin level, and that a moderately-high-carb diet is one of those alternative ways to achieve this outcome. If not, how else do we explain it? (I have read Gary Taub&#39;s article on issues with population-based studies but I think there is more to it than just saying there were mistakes made in all the studies on the health of traditional Asian diets.)

                      I'm a quitter...but I'm back now.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        1



                        I have read some interesting articles lately on what the Okinawan diet is REALLY like (can you say "veggies and pork fat"?!?) Apparently, the Okinawans do not traditionally consume as much rice as other parts of Japan and eat a lot of fish veggies, tubers and have a chunk of pork in nearly evey dish they eat. They cook in pork fat. Also, the Japanese diet is not low fat (or low meat) as many claim. Japan, after all, is the land of kobe beef!

                        http://www.prettyinprimal.blogspot.com

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          1



                          @arthurb99

                          Look for completeness (near 100% of DV, which is designed to prevent deficiency, not keep you in ideal condition), inclusion of micronutrients, and make sure the vitamins are in the right form (retinol, not beta-carotene / cholecalciferol (d3) not ergocalciferol (d2)). Mixed tocopherols/tocotrienols are superior to single species. K2 would be excellent if you can find it in your multi, but it&#39;s not common. You will probably want to supp vitamin D even if you take a multi, since most just don&#39;t have that much.


                          Fish oil should ideally be vacuum sealed, refrigerated, and stored in a dark bottle. It&#39;s nice to have it in a bottle so you can taste if it&#39;s gone rancid. Most reputable brands assay for PCB, dioxin, and mercury but if one you&#39;re looking at doesn&#39;t, reconsider.


                          @ Frogfarm


                          Unfortunately, biochem is a confusing mess (see http://blog.everydayscientist.com/wp...metabolism.jpg). If nothing else, learn about central metabolism (glycolysis and Kreb&#39;s Cycle), insulin/glucagon signalling, and basic cellular anatomy. From there, you&#39;ll at least be able to branch off and learn specifics more easily.


                          @PDL

                          UVB will help vitamin D status (although you might still benefit from an oil-capped D supplement), but I believe UVA and B are both required for a complete, long-lasting tan.


                          Vitamin D status is, in fact, associated with improvement of osteoarthritis and other cartilage issues.

                          Give me liberty. Exploration of other options will be vigorously discouraged.

                          Wondering something sciencey? Ask me in my Ask a Biochemist Thread

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            1



                            @ Stabby


                            I think the glycemic index is potentially helpful, but has to be taken in the context of the glycemic LOAD. Sure, it&#39;s nice when the sugars absorb slowly, but when there just isn&#39;t that much sugar in the first place (as in many high glycemic veggies), who cares?


                            Additionally, the higher in fructose something is, the lower a GI it has for a given amount of carbohydrate (since fructose doesn&#39;t enter the bloodstream). Agave nectar is pure sugar, but it&#39;s low GI. Why? Because it&#39;s up to 90% fructose. Lame.


                            @ Asturian


                            There&#39;s some evidence that IF improves leptin sensitivity, but it&#39;s not conclusive yet. I wouldn&#39;t be surprised.


                            Walking, sprinting, weight-lifting, getting enough sleep, and lowering stress all improve insulin sensitivity.


                            Improving insulin sensitivity helps the leptin sensitivity situation even in the absence of other improvements since the two are partially antagonistic. In fact, because of this, it&#39;s tough to pin down when you&#39;re improving leptin with an intervention or just insulin.


                            @ Malpaz


                            I would look into traditional fertility diets of hunter gatherers. The Weston A Price foundation has a lot of material on this. From what I recall, lots of liver, seafood (but watch your mercury), shellfish, and bird and fish eggs are the common themes. Lots and lots and lots of fat-soluble vitamins. Lots of iron.

                            Give me liberty. Exploration of other options will be vigorously discouraged.

                            Wondering something sciencey? Ask me in my Ask a Biochemist Thread

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              1



                              @ Canarygirl


                              1. If you happen to find the picture/post I&#39;d be happy to address it more specifically, but it&#39;s tough to do your question justice as is. I&#39;m not aware of any inflammatory properties of chylomicrons (the lipoprotein particles that ferry dietary fats around before they get processed), while VLDL (which carries around trigs from carbohydrates) and glucose (at least high levels of glucose) are both inflammatory. I&#39;m skeptical to say the least.


                              2. As I&#39;ve said before, I&#39;m not convinced that glucose itself is a problem in the absence of pathology caused by agents like gluten/fructose/PUFA. I think quite a range of macronutrient ratios will produce acceptable outcomes if you aren&#39;t too damaged. Low carb, however, seems to be very helpful when you already have metabolic syndrome.


                              While rice isn&#39;t paleo, white rice is low phytate, gluten-free, low lectin, zero fructose, and very nearly fat-free (and therefore low PUFA). It&#39;s largely empty calories, but hey, you&#39;ve got to eat something. Importantly, it&#39;s not necessarily going to cause pathology on its own.

                              Give me liberty. Exploration of other options will be vigorously discouraged.

                              Wondering something sciencey? Ask me in my Ask a Biochemist Thread

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                1



                                Hi, Grokologist


                                I&#39;m glad to see what you have to say about white rice. It also keeps very well, partly because it&#39;s so fat-free (nothing to get rancid) and such an incomplete food (protein.)


                                So I keep some big mason jars of it for sheer calories in case of some emergency (earthquake, electromagnetic pulse frying computers, whatever.) With that and the grassfed lamb fatty scraps in my chest freezer, and a good Berkey water filter, plus greens, etc. from the yard I feel like I could keep going for a long time without buying any food, and feed some of the neighbors as well.


                                Enough Gloom and Doom -- possibly too much. But I&#39;m glad that white rice, while so high carb, is free of so many other grainy problems.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X