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Quite the bomshell

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  • Quite the bomshell

    The great majority of ingredients in the industrially produced foods consumed in the West are absorbed in the upper part of small intestine and thus of limited benifit to the microbiota. Lack of proper nutrition for microbiota is a major factor under-pinning dysfunctional microbiota, dysbiosis, chronically elevated inflammation, and the production and leakage of endotoxins through the various tissue barriers. Furthermore, the over comsumption [sic] of insulinogenic foods and proteotoxins, such as advanced glycation and lipoxidation molecules, gluten and zein, and a reduced intake of fruit and vegetables, are key factors behind the commonly observed elevated inflammation and the endemic of obesity and chronic diseases, factors which are also likely to be detrimental to microbiota. As a consequence of this lifestyle and the associated eating habits, most barriers, including the gut, the airways, the skin, the oral cavity, the vagina, the placenta, the blood-brain barrier, etc., are increasingly permeable. Attempts to recondition these barriers through the use of so called 'probiotics', normally applied to the gut, are rarely successful, and sometimes fail, as they are usually applied as adjunctive treatments, e.g. in parallel with heavy pharmaceutical treatment, not rarely consisting in antibiotics and chemotherapy. It is increasingly observed that the majority of pharmaceutical drugs, even those believed to have minimal adverse effects, such as proton pump inhibitors and anti-hypertensives, in fact adversely affect immune development and functions and are most likely also deleterious to microbiota. Equally, it appears that probiotic treatment is not campatable [sic] with pharmacological treatments. ...
    Gut microbiota, immune development and function. [Pharmacol Res. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI

  • #2
    Originally posted by Lewis View Post
    Gut microbiota, immune development and function. [Pharmacol Res. 2012] - PubMed - NCBIThe great majority of ingredients in the industrially produced foods consumed in the West are absorbed in the upper part of small intestine and thus of limited benifit to the microbiota.

    Lack of proper nutrition for microbiota is a major factor under-pinning dysfunctional microbiota, dysbiosis, chronically elevated inflammation, and the production and leakage of endotoxins through the various tissue barriers. Furthermore, the over comsumption [sic] of insulinogenic foods and proteotoxins, such as advanced glycation and lipoxidation molecules, gluten and zein, and a reduced intake of fruit and vegetables, are key factors behind the commonly observed elevated inflammation and the endemic of obesity and chronic diseases, factors which are also likely to be detrimental to microbiota.

    As a consequence of this lifestyle and the associated eating habits, most barriers, including the gut, the airways, the skin, the oral cavity, the vagina, the placenta, the blood-brain barrier, etc., are increasingly permeable. Attempts to recondition these barriers through the use of so called 'probiotics', normally applied to the gut, are rarely successful, and sometimes fail, as they are usually applied as adjunctive treatments, e.g. in parallel with heavy pharmaceutical treatment, not rarely consisting in antibiotics and chemotherapy.

    It is increasingly observed that the majority of pharmaceutical drugs, even those believed to have minimal adverse effects, such as proton pump inhibitors and anti-hypertensives, in fact adversely affect immune development and functions and are most likely also deleterious to microbiota. Equally, it appears that probiotic treatment is not campatable [sic] with pharmacological treatments. ...
    (I broke the quote up as it was hard to read...) but so does this mean that supplementing with probiotic pills and fermented items doesn't work at all, or doesn't work when your taking other pharmaceutical drugs with those probiotics that usually you wouldn't realize have an impact?

    For example, I know that if I'm taking an antibiotic and a probiotic at the same time, the probiotics aren't going to have much of a chance. But can you tell what are the other drugs that they cited in the study? (I'm useless at looking at abstracts...) Statins? Metformin? Anti-psychotics? Blood pressure meds?

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    • #3
      I'll be interested to know what he has to say on that, as on much else adumbrated in that abstract. Can't wait for the full publication.

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      • #4
        absolutely.

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        • #5
          From personal experience, taking any antibiotics will automatically cause yeast problems "down below". I used to ask for a Diflucan prescription along with my antibiotic (this was when I used to take antibiotics). Then one day a pharmacy tech told me about acidophilus and I've never had any problems with antibiotics since then. I had a tick bite several years ago and was on antibiotics for 3 weeks. I took acidophilus with every meal and all was good! So I'm gonna say that they work.

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