Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Do You Take Matt Stone Seriously?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Eh, there are other anti-low carb viewpoints that I'd rather read than Matt Stone (carbsanity and freetheanimal to start)

    Comment


    • #32
      So wait. People ignored Mark Sisson's reccomendation of 50-100 carbs (more if you feel worse on less) and then 100-150 carbs once you are at your ideal weight and somehow think that carb reduction is bad?

      Duh. If you eat too few of a nutrient and get sick it doesn't mean that eating insanely amounts of that nutrient is the cure.

      People go to crazy extremes sometimes...

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Dualhammers View Post
        So wait. People ignored Mark Sisson's reccomendation of 50-100 carbs (more if you feel worse on less) and then 100-150 carbs once you are at your ideal weight and somehow think that carb reduction is bad?

        Duh. If you eat too few of a nutrient and get sick it doesn't mean that eating insanely amounts of that nutrient is the cure.

        People go to crazy extremes sometimes...
        Bravo! Dualhammers! It's the all-or-nothing mindset that really makes for problems on this big spinning rock. Workable solutions are most always gray, not black or white.
        Height: 5' 10"
        Starting Weight: 292
        Starting Primal Weight: 275
        Current weight: 224
        Goal weight: 172
        Body Fat 30.5

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by shannon View Post
          well at first (under 100g/carb) i felt wonderful. almost high and euphoric. nothing could touch me! then about a few mos. later my energy started to drag. should i lower my carbs? i mean lowering...

          Some of the problems in this discussion has to do with hormone differences between men and women. Women need more carbs then men. I can go with less than 30 grams of carbs a day if I'm relaxing for the period. This would kill my wife. I suggest reading through stuff in the blog below, as it has a unique woman-centric paleo focus.

          Paleo For Women

          As for the symptoms, you are right on. AS for how much an individual should or should not eat totally depends on the individual. I recommend that everyone experiment a bit to find where they feel best.
          Last edited by Jiigigaw; 07-10-2012, 07:59 AM.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by shannon View Post
            wow. so sorry for the long rant. those were the symptoms I experienced. matt stone lists these symptoms when low carbing too long:
            headaches
            dry mouth/eyes
            allergies
            loss of libido
            stomach issues returning
            low body temp (i went from 96F vlc to 99F paleo carbs)
            pms OR loss of menstruation
            moodiness
            fatigue
            body odor
            bad breath
            poor glucose control
            insulin resistance
            panic attacks
            dry hair (thyroid)
            low blood pressure (adrenal)
            and lots more. those are just the ones i can remember.
            I'm not arguing one side or the other ... but these are issues related to hydration:
            • Headaches
            • Low Blood Pressure


            These are byproducts of being in ketosis
            • body odor ( ketones are water soluble, hence can be excreted via sweat )
            • bad breath ( ditto )
            • poor glucose control**
            • insulin resistance**


            Note that the items I've starred are the result of adaptation to ketones as an energy substrate and such value laden terms as "poor" and "resistance" are the result of conventional medicine studying subjects whose metabolisms are awash in carbohydrates.

            I've posted about this before, but in a nutshell, if your metabolism is ketone adapted, then it is reserving glucose for tissues that cannot use ketones as an energy substrate ( ie red blood cells, and parts of the brain ). The last thing you want is for your muscles to compete with brain and blood cells for glucose, hence, you become "insulin resistant." If you weren't insulin resistant, then your muscles would happily put you into a hypoglycemic coma as soon as some glucose hit your blood stream.

            Generally, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, and you need to be careful to differentiate between insulin resistance when glucose is scarce vs. insulin resistance when glucose is plentiful. The former is physiological insulin resistance ( ketone adapted metabolism ), the latter is pathological ( type II diabetic ).

            Fatigue is interesting, insofar as this might be indicative of phosphate metabolism issues. I would be very curious to see what would happen to folks experiencing these symptoms were they to supplement with creatine, which both acts as a phosphate donor for ATP generation and serves to increase hydration via retention of water.

            Just some idle thoughts ...

            -PK
            My blog : cogitoergoedo.com

            Interested in Intermittent Fasting? This might help: part 1, part 2, part 3.

            Comment


            • #36
              The guy is KA-RAY-ZE.
              Last edited by NoSaladWithoutMeat; 07-21-2012, 02:43 PM.
              "The penis is the male animal-flower, a soft-firm dildo, a warm dream."
              -Raymond Peat, PhD

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by NoSaladWithoutMeat View Post
                The guy is KA-RAY-ZE.
                Am I KA-RAY-ZE or did Mark Sisson just write an blog post for Matt Stone:

                10 Health Reasons to Spend Time Outdoors 180 Degree Health
                (1) I am 100% on-board with the primal exercise blue print. It reduces the problem of exercise down to its simplest form and provides a solution that can be used for a lifetime.

                (2) I'm not on-board with the primal diet blue print. In fact, I'm not on-board with any diet plan but a man can hope to find the right answer before it's too late.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Dualhammers View Post
                  So wait. People ignored Mark Sisson's reccomendation of 50-100 carbs (more if you feel worse on less) and then 100-150 carbs once you are at your ideal weight and somehow think that carb reduction is bad?

                  Duh. If you eat too few of a nutrient and get sick it doesn't mean that eating insanely amounts of that nutrient is the cure.

                  People go to crazy extremes sometimes...
                  Seriously. Just eat real food. Nutrient rich. Rice is O.K. Yams are O.K. People go too extreme. Keep veggies in every meal. Eat good fat. No sugar. No gluten... And eat some carbs once [or twice] in a while..
                  I believe in God, only I spell it Nature.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    it would be better to consult a doctor rather than moving for such things here and there
                    Last edited by AureliaWaterman; 05-21-2013, 12:32 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by shannon View Post
                      he's still a douche
                      I think you'll get some points for that line!
                      And I agree completely with your stance on low carb diets; long term.
                      Good to know you're doing better.
                      Retirement has afforded me the ultimate affluence, that of free time (Sahlins/Wells)

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I haven't read all of Matt Stone's works. But I have read two of his e-books. The first one I read was "180 Degree Digestion". The other one was "Diet Recovery". I've also read many of his blog posts. I disagree with him.
                        Last edited by ksmithdc; 12-31-2014, 12:29 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by ksmithdc View Post
                          In my opinion, I think he's just another guy trying to make a name for himself by bucking the trends and being a maverick. Sometimes being different is a good thing. But being different just to be different (and while preaching incorrect concepts)...well that's just dangerous
                          To put it simply :

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by ksmithdc View Post
                            Hello everyone,

                            I'm new to this forum and this is my first post. I'd like to share my impressions about Matt Stone. But before I do that, I'd like to first introduce myself to the group. My name is Dr. Kevin Smith. I'm a chiropractor and a nutritionist. My clinical specialty is metabolic care, with a special emphasis on thyroid disorders. I've been in practice for 13 years and practice just outside of Pittsburgh, PA. Nice to meet you all.

                            I haven't read all of Matt Stone's works. But I have read two of his e-books. The first one I read was "180 Degree Digestion". The other one was "Diet Recovery". I've also read many of his blog posts. Here are my impressions:

                            Matt frequently comes across in a crass, vulgar way reminiscent of a drunk guy in a bar. While I will sometimes cuss and swear (mostly while I'm playing golf), I don't think incorporating profanity in a book is necessary. In fact, my feelings are that it tends to diminish one's credibility and professionalism. I just don't care for it. The litmus test is - would you want your kid to read it? If not, perhaps it's time to clean up your act a bit.

                            Quite often, he comes across as a dissident for the sole singular purpose of being a dissident, not necessarily because of a real issue he has with something. I think he’s just trying to make a name for himself by showing everyone why everybody in the history of nutrition is completely wrong.

                            His books seem to be fluffed up with low quality content including testimonials, and statements designed to give an impression that he’s the ultimate authority on the subject matter. He will go on and on that he read 300 books, read every blog on the internet, poured through thousands of medical journals and found the secrets of the universe – which he alone possesses.

                            When refuting something, he will frequently cite an isolated example of how one tribe of people who live in the jungles in Africa eat a certain way yet none of them have xyz disease, or how a group of South American Indians do things a specific way…and yet they don’t have any immune issues, all of them live long full lives and they all enjoy robust health. The point being that he doesn’t account for ALL of the variables for why a specific indigenous group of people has good or bad health. He only isolates one variable and attempts to sell that as the issue.

                            When Matt criticizes the Paleo people or the low carb lifestyle, he paints with a broad brush, most often failing to differentiate between good quality carbs (vegetables), and bad carbs (refined sugars). This is where I believe his is most dangerous. Because people who aren't clinically trained, and/or lack the skills to differentiate between some of the more technical issues probably aren't going to be able to see through the guise.

                            As one example of this, he will properly address the issue of insulin resistance as a major health concern. And then in the next sentence, he will contradict himself by badmouthing the Paleo lifestyle, citing it as a fad. What he's failing to include in his diatribe is that there's a huge difference between a plate of broccoli vs. a plate of Oreo cookies. Yes, they're both technically carbs. But the way the body metabolizes each of them is dramatically different.

                            He correctly acknowledges the thyroid and the basal metabolic rate as an integral component of health. But he doesn't mention the #1 cause of hypothyroidism is Hashimoto's Autoimmune Disease, nor does he mention the seven triggers which further causes hypothyroidism (anemias, blood sugar dysregulation, sex hormone dysregulation, adrenal exhaustion, food intolerance, gastrointestinal problems (such as leaky gut syndrome, dysbiosis, infections, etc.) and chronic inflammation. (And seeing as how chronic over consumption of refined carbohydrates and gluten exposure) is a common link between all of it, it goes without saying anyone who isn't on board with the Paleo lifestyle really isn't paying attention here.

                            When criticizing fiber, he cites legumes, grains, and nuts as prime examples of why people shouldn’t take excessive fiber (as these things cause gastrointestinal distress). What he’s leaving out (either because he’s ignorant or because he’s being intentially dishonest) is that not all fiber is created equally. And fiber from eating broccoli, kale, spinach, and other raw, whole foods will NOT cause inflammation and distress. Additionally eating foods high in fiber leads to greater satiety which decreases the likelihood of overeating. He’s also wrong about fiber slowing down bowel transit times. It actually increases bowel transit time.

                            Mr. Stone embraces whole grains as a healthy, perfectly viable food – when in fact it is pro-inflammatory, loaded with gluten and has no nutritional value (empty calories).

                            His primary test for measuring metabolism is the basal temperature test (axiallary temperature measurement), which he believes should be 97.8 to 98.2 degrees F). One's basal temperature isn't not the primary determining factor in evaluating thyroid function. Thyroid function can only be properly evaluated by doing a comprehensive blood analysis and measuring TSH, T4, T3 (Both free & bound), reverse T3, T3 uptake as well as checking for antibodies for TPO and antithyroglobulin antibodies.

                            In his discussion about gluten, he tends to minimize the effect gluten has on our bodies, and claims it's blown out of proportion. Current scientific literature shows a direct linkage between gluten exposure and 55 diseases.

                            I can understand why some people would want to follow Matt Stone. I think the people who would be attracted to him are the ones who couldn't follow the Paleo lifestyle and are looking for a guru to give them permission to go back to their high carb lifestyle.

                            In my opinion, I think he's just another guy trying to make a name for himself by bucking the trends and being a maverick. Sometimes being different is a good thing. But being different just to be different (and while preaching incorrect concepts)...well that's just dangerous.



                            Dr. Kevin Smith
                            Here's what I notice on this forum....

                            There are some people that are against the Paleo diet, and some that are for it.

                            While the side that is for it has individuals whose posts are laden with actual facts, and display enough knowledge that you have bonafide concepts and ideas to verify on your own, the other side seems to NOT be this way.

                            The Ray Peat lovers, the Matt Stone lovers...I'm just not seeing anything that is verifiable (for the most part, some points are good, but are common knowledge).

                            Thanks ksmithdc for your post. I have not yet made the switch to Paleo, and won't be for quite some time, but as I research and arm myself with additional information, posts like yours prove to be very helpful.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Hello, Dr. Kevin, and welcome to the MDA forum.

                              Please stick around here and keep posting even if it can get annoying at times.

                              Your scientifically based, logically presented, and articulately written comments would be an asset to this community.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Thank you for your very kind words. It's an honor and a privilege to be here.

                                Lastly, I would just like to thank Mark Sisson for all his fantastic work and for his dedication to helping people.


                                Regards,



                                Dr. Smith
                                Last edited by ksmithdc; 12-31-2014, 12:30 PM.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X