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Study: Cooked meat contains carcinogens in significant studies, review?

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  • Study: Cooked meat contains carcinogens in significant studies, review?

    *Study: Cooked meat contains carcinogens in significant quantities, review?

    The cooked meat carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phe... [Cancer Res. 2007] - PubMed - NCBI
    The Cooked Meat Carcinogen 2-Amino-1-Methyl-6-Phenylimidazo[4,5-b]Pyridine Activates the Extracellular Signal

    It isn't an epidemiological study so don't be so quick to dismiss it. Reading some of it, their conclusion seems pretty reasonable. They claim that cooking meat leads to creation of carcinogens, which when ingested enter blood plasma and lead to physiological changes at the cellular level. However I can't really find what cooking methods they have determined leads to significant levels of carcinogens, nor if meat quality matters. Additionally the overall increase in risk, of cancer, isn't mentioned.

    Is there anyone with more experience in biological sciences, or who has heard of this study, who could provide a review of the paper? I haven't been able to find a review from googling it.
    http://lifemutt.blogspot.sg/ - Gaming, Food Reviews and Life in Singapore

  • #2
    Originally posted by AMonkey View Post
    ... don't be so quick to dismiss it. ...
    Thanks for the instruction. I shan't be running around like a headless chicken over a foodstuff that people have been eating for hundreds of thousands of years, however.

    The real question here, it seems to me, is are you going to regularly burn your meat and eat the burnt portions?

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    • #3
      Food For Thought: Meat-Based Diet Made Us Smarter : NPR

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      • #4
        I thought that was pretty much an accepted general rule that it's best to avoid charring your meat. The best you can do is minimize these substances by not burning your meat at extremely high heat and offsetting them with other protective foods.

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        • #5
          Yeah this is well known, and just about everything is a carcinogen, lol.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Lewis View Post
            Thanks for the instruction. I shan't be running around like a headless chicken over a foodstuff that people have been eating for hundreds of thousands of years, however.

            The real question here, it seems to me, is are you going to regularly burn your meat and eat the burnt portions?
            The study claims that these carcinogens are produced in normal cooking of meat. And "we done it for millions of years, so its not harmful" isn't a proper rebuttal to what this research claims.
            http://lifemutt.blogspot.sg/ - Gaming, Food Reviews and Life in Singapore

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            • #7
              That's why we cook our meat at low temperatures, and go on the rare side. It took a little getting use to, but now I can straight up eat raw meat. I don't do it, I do prefer my pathogens dead for the most part. But it's not as revolting as it first seemed.
              Crohn's, doing SCD

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                That's why we cook our meat at low temperatures, and go on the rare side. It took a little getting use to, but now I can straight up eat raw meat. I don't do it, I do prefer my pathogens dead for the most part. But it's not as revolting as it first seemed.
                Have you ever eaten a raw vegan? The news always says they're really good for you.
                In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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                • #9
                  Don't get me wrong. I cook my veggies to a mush! But I've never liked the taste of burned food. Even when you're supposed to, like barbeque. I often got mad at grown-ups for burning the meat. I'd tell these well-,meaning, generous and hapless adults to pay attention and stop burning the meat (Ah, aspergers - how I love you). But, mmm, yum, I like my meat rare!
                  Crohn's, doing SCD

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AMonkey View Post
                    The study claims that these carcinogens are produced in normal cooking of meat. And "we done it for millions of years, so its not harmful" isn't a proper rebuttal to what this research claims.
                    Ehm no it doesnt. They didnt even cook meat for this study, they just used the heterocyclic amines for an in-vitro study. The only thing this study says, is that these carcinogens are potentially dangerous even at lower doses than previously thought.

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                    • #11
                      I think the logical follow-ups to this study are to:

                      A: look at actual impacts of blood concentrations of the offending substances following a meal of cooked meat, and B
                      B: look at varying the degree/intensity of cooking and determine its impact on the formation of these products.

                      The study shows a particular response to a particular chemical - okay. However, to support their conclusion, they need to demonstrate that certain actions do produce the claimed increase in blood levels of the suspect chemical.


                      (I'm not disagreeing with the original post in this thread - in fact, I suspect that the negative effects that data sometimes show to be associated with meat eating, are not the direct product of meat itself, but perhaps iron overload and/or overcooking)

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                      • #12
                        And vegetables and fruits are anti-oxidants. A balance is created in eating a well rounded diet of meat, roots/tubers, fruits, and occasional nuts/seeds.

                        You can't totally get caught up in nutritionism and lose sight of what is good for you.

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                        • #13
                          Cooking and even charring meat leads to a very large variety of compounds (which change based on temperature, method of cooking, holding time, holding temp, reheating methods). Some of these are carcinogenic, some are anti-carcinogenic. Unless you're some lame molecular gastronomy purist you consume all of these complex compounds at the same time, not in isolation. This is just like most of those "damning" studies on dairy which focus on the terrible effects of high consumption of isolated casein when there are just as many studies showing the protective effects of whey protein.
                          "You can demonstrate the purpose and limits of human digestion with a simple experiment: eat a steak with some whole corn kernels, and see what comes out the other end. It won’t be the steak."
                          -J.Stanton

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                          • #14
                            I slow cook meat in the crock pot on medium for hrs, all day really.
                            On the gas grill, I set it at 300 and cook chicken breasts and ribs for a long time.
                            Steaks a different story, short time, but still never on high temps.
                            Inside, on a Bosch glass cooktop, I get the pan hot on maybe 8, then cook never higher than 4.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Nekron View Post
                              Ehm no it doesnt.
                              "During the cooking of meat, mutagenic and carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are formed"

                              Originally posted by wiltondeportes View Post
                              You can't totally get caught up in nutritionism and lose sight of what is good for you.
                              I'm interested in the truth and then how to act on it. Lets suppose that eating meat regularly does increase the risk of cancer significantly, then its not really good for you is it. So then am I going to bury my head in the sand and pretend its bad science like anybody who is invested in dogma? Will I just accept the consequences, and continue eating lots of meat, due to the convenience and taste? Will I reduce the meat I consume or cook it less?
                              Last edited by AMonkey; 06-23-2012, 08:08 PM.
                              http://lifemutt.blogspot.sg/ - Gaming, Food Reviews and Life in Singapore

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