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Deaths of young & fit athletes apparently rising

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  • #16
    It's probably worth paying for your son to have a screening, to put your mind at rest.

    Damn, my post above is incorrect. For some reason I was sure that scans for heart defects on neonates had been routine for a while now in the UK. Perhaps that applies to the NHS trust where I used to work.

    Screening all newborns for heart defects could save hundreds of lives a year | Mail Online
    Last edited by paleo-bunny; 05-07-2012, 11:19 AM. Reason: clarification
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
      It's probably worth paying for your son to have a screening, to put your mind at rest.

      Damn, my post above is incorrect. For some reason I was sure that scans for heart defects on neonates had been routine for a while now in the UK. Perhaps that applies to the NHS trust where I used to work.

      Screening all newborns for heart defects could save hundreds of lives a year | Mail Online
      I agree. He actually has a physical scheduled tomorrow for sports and for entering high school in the Fall. I am going to ask about it, I've read that some of the problems that occur can't be screened for though.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by sroelofs View Post
        I thought these cases were related to defective heart valves (a genetic condition). It will usually only cause a problem in a person when they get older (40-50+). But these athletes are pushing themselves to limits most people don't get to, so the heart fails earlier.

        The Australian Olympic team are scanning every athletes heart before the London Olympics just to be safe.
        My point was could accumulated generational poor eating (& CW high carb/low fat has been going for a while now) cause genetic defects? Would we know? As more & more is researched about eating 'non-primally' - and I use the term to cover the diets of agricultual socitis in the last 10,000 years - we have seen that man has shrunk, brain size has shrunk etc. Is it byoned the realms of possibility that hearts are being affected too?

        Anyway, it is all interesting to me, my idea was to get discussions going & see wher they went..
        Odille
        F 58 / 170cms / SW 131.5 kgs / Current 112.4/ GW 65
        following Primal Lifestyle and swimming my way to health

        My Primal Blog / Photo Blog / RedBubble shop / My Calendars / My Facebook

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        • #19
          My point in my post was that it is not just happening in Professional and college sports, but also in athletes at much younger ages. I am wondering too if there is a diet component, whether it be a genetic defect caused by poor maternal diet or something causing inflammation (etc) in a person's current diet. My concern is just more for a personal reason than out of pure curiosity.

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          • #20
            Bored to death from playing soccer or competitive swimming? Kidding, of course. A few deaths does not prove or show anything meaningful. Do you have a study, an actual piece of research? Don't trust newspapers for science.
            If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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            • #21
              i guess this is brought by too much drug abusing. I live in an area whether almost 85% of people use drugs. Where is the world going?

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              • #22
                I think I can add a little first hand insight here, as I'm one of the people who *was* in the group for young athletes suddenly dropping dead. You're going to see slightly higher incidents of electrical etiology in cardiac events in that age range (15-35). Why? We're the ones getting our heart rates way up there, Joe the Jogger and Cory the Couch Potato probably don't break a heart rate of 160 bpm unless they are straining to take a dump.

                So here is my example (29 years old): Last year while on a training run, at night, solo, without a cell phone (doh). I was doing a high tempo run with my heart rate around 200 bpm; about a mile in my chest got extremely tight, I got light headed, pin point vision, sky high heart rate (estimated at 280 bpm), couldn't catch my breath, etc. etc.

                I dropped to the ground and laid there dripping sweat forcing myself to take deep breathes. Since I'm not the smartest guy around, I decided to crawl/walk home back the 1 mile. It took about 40 mins to get home, during that time my extremities started to tingle and go cold.

                Long story short I knew I was in cardiac shock by the time I got home, nothing was bringing my heart rate down. So got to the phone called 911, firefighters came first and got my EKG started; 268 BPM and Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). Paramedic came (a cute one at that) and got to me the ER. My SVT broke just in time to avoid being cardioverted. Heart rate had dropped to 180 by then.

                Luckily I got seen by a good ER doc, and an excellent cardiologist. Once they ruled out drugs of course. Fast forward to the diagnoses and surgery. I had Atrioventricular Nodal Reentrant Tachycardia (AVRNT) caused by extra nervous tissue (Purkinje fibers) in my left ventricle which had to be removed surgically. It was the worst case the Cardiologist had seen.

                Now in my case it never showed up on an EKG and was only triggered in a very small heart rate range, during surgery it took some drugs and a lot of prodding to get it to trigger on the table. So if I didn't workout as hard it most likely would never have been an issue.

                There are other conditions that can be fatal (AVRNT is rarely fatal) to athletes that most people won't be as "at risk" for because they don't push their bodies that hard.
                "Go For Broke"
                Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
                Small Kine-168/9%
                Now- 200/8%
                Goal- 210/6%

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                • #23
                  I think they are simply being pushed too hard. A lot of these guys will train everyday. I don't know why people think sport is healthy, in many cases its not

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Wanderlust View Post
                    I think I can add a little first hand insight here, as I'm one of the people who *was* in the group for young athletes suddenly dropping dead.
                    Holy crow. O_O What a story!
                    Steph
                    My Primal Meanderings

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Wanderlust View Post
                      There are other conditions that can be fatal (AVRNT is rarely fatal) to athletes that most people won't be as "at risk" for because they don't push their bodies that hard.
                      This.
                      I've got of one them journal thingies. One Night At McCool's

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