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Red meat consumption, iron metabolism and accelerated aging

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  • #46
    Originally posted by zizou View Post
    Had some bloodwork done for a few parameters... I hope that it's my diet at play and not significant inflammation like my doc suggested...This thread was fairly interesting read.
    Assuming that it turns out to be diet related, here are the 3 strategies:

    (1) Reduce consumption of high-iron foods
    (2) Increase consumption of 'iron absoprtion blockers' when consuming high iron foods, tea and coffee are 2 of the best
    (3) Increase consumption of 'iron chelators' which remove iron already absorbed in the body, dairy products are a good source of these

    Yes, it's an interesting topic. If/when I learn more, I'll post an update.
    (1) I am 100% on-board with the primal exercise blue print. It reduces the problem of exercise down to its simplest form and provides a solution that can be used for a lifetime.

    (2) I'm not on-board with the primal diet blue print. In fact, I'm not on-board with any diet plan but a man can hope to find the right answer before it's too late.

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    • #47
      Donate blood to reduce your iron level.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by PaleoLogicCheck View Post
        Assuming that it turns out to be diet related, here are the 3 strategies:

        (1) Reduce consumption of high-iron foods
        (2) Increase consumption of 'iron absoprtion blockers' when consuming high iron foods, tea and coffee are 2 of the best
        (3) Increase consumption of 'iron chelators' which remove iron already absorbed in the body, dairy products are a good source of these

        Yes, it's an interesting topic. If/when I learn more, I'll post an update.
        Hey Paleologic, thanks for the reply.

        I will hopefully get the test done soon and will start drinking green tea a bit again. Will keep an eye out on this thread, but also an eye out on my beloved steaks.
        Originally posted by workinprogress View Post
        Donate blood to reduce your iron level.
        This is actually a welcoming cure, and best bit is it works. How cool is it to heal yourself by helping others..

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        • #49
          Update:

          The whole 'accumulated iron' theory discussed here turns out to be part of a broader theory of aging called 'overmineralization'.

          Here's how one source ( FAQ related to Longevinex®: resveratrol based anti-aging pill ) describes it:

          "During the first 18 years of life, all the calcium consumed in the diet is directed toward building new bone, and all the dietary iron is shuttled to the bone marrow to make new red blood cells. Up to that point in time, humans have had birthdays, but they have not begun to age. But once the human body stops growing, at around age 18, these two key minerals begin to accumulate in cells, leading to progressive aging (calcification and rusting).

          Markers of aging in living cells, such as accumulation of a form of debris called lipofuscin, does not begin to materialize until the third decade of life, after childhood growth has ceased. Lipofuscin is composed of fats and proteins that represent cellular garbage, which are normally cleared from living cells during youth by enzymes produced from lyosomes, which are organelles within living cells. The energy for lyosomes to do their cleanup work is provided by other organelles called mitochondria, known as the atomic power plants of living cells. As these organelles within living cells beging to calcify and rust, the cell progressively ages.

          By age 40 a male will have twice the calcium and iron stored in his body compared to an equally aged female and will experience double the risk for heart problems, cancer and diabetes. Females escape this fate for a time, donating calcium to their offspring and eliminating iron from the body during monthly menstruation. Progressive aging for females begins with menopause or early hysterectomy."


          Of course this source sells a pill that 'reverses' all of that. I kind of doubt that.


          But as for the theory itself, it sounds to me like a plausible and significant piece of the aging puzzle. It's based on evidence and is consistent. The only part I don't 'get' is why a mechanism to 'excrete' these excess minerals hasn't evolved, or was selected against.
          (1) I am 100% on-board with the primal exercise blue print. It reduces the problem of exercise down to its simplest form and provides a solution that can be used for a lifetime.

          (2) I'm not on-board with the primal diet blue print. In fact, I'm not on-board with any diet plan but a man can hope to find the right answer before it's too late.

          Comment


          • #50
            I remember reading many years ago the connection between high iron levels and heart attacks... so it's funny that the information isn't more present today?! (I reckon it was about 15 to 20 years ago that I first heard about it). I think it's probably a good reason why people should donate blood! (Which I would except for the restrictions after having tattoos - I think you have to wait a year after tattooing to donate blood ).

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            • #51
              On what evidence is it based?

              From my reading, the metabolism of calcium is governed by Vitamin D, Vitamin A, Vitamin K2, magnesium, zinc and selenium. Get those right and calcium can't build up in your arteries, you wont get osteoporosis and you'll maintain strong teeth.

              Iron buildup on the other hand does have definite genetic influences. My mother was homozygous for one of the haemochromatosis mutations. Wasn't discovered until her liver was destroyed. That makes me heterozygous, so with a disposition to building up iron. After I discovered this, I resumed regular blood donations. Unfortunately, I had a heart attack a few years later and this disqualified me from further donations. Curiously though, monitoring of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation since then have shown stable iron levels. Red meat intake has increased in that period

              Just an N=1 that is partly consistent with what you've said above and partly inconsistent. I'm sticking to the primal lifestyle, including the dietary part, for now on the basis of what I've read and my own experience
              Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

              Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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              • #52
                Originally posted by peril View Post
                On what evidence is it based?
                Disease statistics that compare the rates of age-related disease incidence (cardio, cancer, diabetes...) between same-age males and females. Women have lower rates until menopause and/or hysterectomy.

                As this is only part of the aging picture, I don't think overmineralization is the only culprit. In other words, even if their 'magic pill' removed all exceess iron and calcium we would still age. Why? Pre-menopausal women still 'age' in the common sense way (look/feel older) but just don't develop degenerative diseases at the same rate as same-age males.

                Originally posted by peril View Post
                From my reading, the metabolism of calcium is governed by Vitamin D, Vitamin A, Vitamin K2, magnesium, zinc and selenium. Get those right and calcium can't build up in your arteries, you wont get osteoporosis and you'll maintain strong teeth.
                I agree but that is all genetically governed as well. You're simply listing the nutrients required (some from diet, some synthesized) for the genetically regulated process to work correctly. Every process in the body is determined genetically (dna). There is nothing else.

                Originally posted by peril View Post
                Iron buildup on the other hand does have definite genetic influences. My mother was homozygous for one of the haemochromatosis mutations. Wasn't discovered until her liver was destroyed. That makes me heterozygous, so with a disposition to building up iron. After I discovered this, I resumed regular blood donations. Unfortunately, I had a heart attack a few years later and this disqualified me from further donations. Curiously though, monitoring of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation since then have shown stable iron levels. Red meat intake has increased in that period
                Yes, I agree in your case iron regulation is 'genetic' in that you have an inherited family trait towards overload. Have you considered having your hepcidin checked? I know I haven't been active on this thread in a while but hepcidin is the master hormone for iron regulation. It's analogous to insulin for glucose regulation. Apparently, hepcidin level is the more reliable marker for assessing abnormal iron metabolism.

                Originally posted by peril View Post
                Just an N=1 that is partly consistent with what you've said above and partly inconsistent. I'm sticking to the primal lifestyle, including the dietary part, for now on the basis of what I've read and my own experience
                I don't really have an issue with the primal lifestyle per se. I do think the data suggests that iron (most easily absorbed from red meat) builds up in our tissues and accelerates our aging. The more you eat, the faster it happens and the sooner you die. This is 'natural' though and actually people that eat red meat should be healthy along the way. They just won't live as long as they could otherwise. Not that maximizing longevity is something everyone aspires too. I'm not sure I do.

                On the other hand, I do have problems with the primal diet. Remember Mark doesn't just tell people to go on a primal diet. He tells people to go on a primal diet AND take his supplements. I believe his supplements are designed very well, he's done a great job with them. I attribute much of his success in optimizing his health to his supplements. If you aren't taking his supplement program but you are eating a primal diet - then just realize you aren't doing the same thing that he is. That's a seemingly small difference that can lead to big difference in the long term outcome. I recommend all people that go on the primal diet should also take his supplements. I have no financial gain from saying so.
                Last edited by PaleoLogicCheck; 10-04-2012, 05:39 AM.
                (1) I am 100% on-board with the primal exercise blue print. It reduces the problem of exercise down to its simplest form and provides a solution that can be used for a lifetime.

                (2) I'm not on-board with the primal diet blue print. In fact, I'm not on-board with any diet plan but a man can hope to find the right answer before it's too late.

                Comment


                • #53
                  the best thing to avoid anti aeging wrinkles is use of too much green vegetables in the diet and avoiding too much consumption of meat food, and one can also use some good wrinkle cream for avoiding wrinkles on ones face

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