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  • Bypass new cure for diabetes

    A "sensational" new finding could be the beginning of a cure for type 2 diabetes...

    “It’s pretty amazing,” said Dr. Phil Schauer of the Cleveland Clinic, the lead author on one of the studies."
    _____
    Most of the surgery patients saw their HDL, the good cholesterol, shoot way up and their artery clogging triglycerides drop sharply.

    “This is sensational,” Nissen told me.
    _____
    Why, in some patients, do the positive effects take place long before they lose weight? Marla Evans, 56, one of the volunteers who got gastric banding in the Cleveland study put it this way, “I was a diabetic, and then after the surgery, within a few days, the diabetes was much better, and within a month or two there was no diabetes in my blood at all.”

    Most experts believe the operations somehow set off massive changes in the body’s hormones. Exactly what and how remains a mystery.

    “This is hotly debated area,” Dr. Rudy Leibel of Columbia University, an authority on metabolic hormones told me. And it is critical because if scientists can figure out how to bring about the changes that control the diabetes without surgery or with far less invasive surgery, the treatment could easily be more widespread.
    ___


    It's a mystery? Really??? Surgery works somehow, but Paleo/Primal eating good food is a fad diet.

  • #2
    well i suppose they should do a follow up study to see what lifestyle changes people had to make in order to adjust post-surgery.
    my primal journal:
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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    • #3
      Vitals - Could weight loss surgery help end diabetes?
      “This is hotly debated area,” Dr. Rudy Leibel of Columbia University, an authority on metabolic hormones told me. And it is critical because if scientists can figure out how to bring about the changes that control the diabetes without surgery or with far less invasive surgery, the treatment could easily be more widespread.
      More from the article:

      But even now medicine faces the question: Is it worth undergoing surgery that costs about $25,000 and carries a significant risk of dangerous complications and unpleasant side effects to treat type 2 diabetes? The answer, most experts say, is that most type 2 diabetics (type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease not impacted by this research) can stay well with diet, exercise and medication. But those who cannot control their disease face complications including heart and kidney disease, along with loss of limbs and visions. One person with uncontrolled diabetes can run up millions in medical bills. So a surgery that was considered extreme not long ago may become a standard treatment for many people with one of the most common diseases of modern times.
      This is hilarious. Or it would be, if it wasn't so tragic.

      If only they would give diabetics sensible dietary advice. Many type 2 diabetics cannot "control their disease" because they have not been taught how to eat in order to control the disease effectively. The American Diabetes Association's dietary recommendations are a joke.

      Sure, expensive surgery, life-long digestive disfunction, continuation of the diet that caused the problem in the first place -- sure, that's the way to go.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Martha View Post
        More from the article:



        This is hilarious. Or it would be, if it wasn't so tragic.

        If only they would give diabetics sensible dietary advice. Many type 2 diabetics cannot "control their disease" because they have not been taught how to eat in order to control the disease effectively. The American Diabetes Association's dietary recommendations are a joke.

        Sure, expensive surgery, life-long digestive disfunction, continuation of the diet that caused the problem in the first place -- sure, that's the way to go.
        My dad is one of the people that has type 2 diabetes and tells me all the time how the doctors can't seem to regulate his sugar. I watch him eat ice cream and cheese puffs and drink full sugar orange soda. I've argued with him, my mom did before she died. He's a full-blown diabetic in denial. SAD

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        • #5
          meanwhile my dad has type 2 diabetes (has never been overweight, never had a sweet tooth, and has always been physically active). He tries to control it through diet and exercise but is losing the battle. I introduced him to primal a while ago, and he says that's basically what he's doing anyway. he really doesn't want to be on meds, but doesn't see any alternative due to the way things are going. BTW, he has tried to manage through diet alone since his diagnosis 9 years ago. just wanted to balance the "fat, lazy diabetic" thing that seemed to be taking place.
          my primal journal:
          http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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          • #6
            When I was diagnosed with Type 2, the doc sent me to a class and to a dietician. The teacher and the dietician were both plump. The food message was "calories in, calories out." Fine to eat 3 carb servings at meals and 1 more at each of 2 snacks.
            Ancestral Health Info - My blog about Primal and the general ancestral health movement. Site just remodeled using HTML5/CSS3 instead of Wordpress.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Hedonist2 View Post
              When I was diagnosed with Type 2, the doc sent me to a class and to a dietician. The teacher and the dietician were both plump. The food message was "calories in, calories out." Fine to eat 3 carb servings at meals and 1 more at each of 2 snacks.
              I still remember when I started being vigilant about diabetes, after I went through a physical for MEPS. I had two immediate sources I bought into: Battling diabetics; and Dr. Neal F.Q. Barnhardt. The former talked about glycemic index; then talked about keeping a regularly scheduled eating plan. Meanwhile, the latter had talked about eating beans, rye, and pumpernickel; along with drinking fat free milk....
              If you have a problem with what you read: 1. Get a dictionary 2. Don't read it 3. Grow up 4. After 3, go back to 1/ or 2. -- Dennis Blue. | "I don't care about your opinion, only your analysis"- Professor Calabrese. | "Life is more important than _______" - Drew | I eat animals that eat vegetables -- Matt Millen, former NFL Linebacker. | "This country is built on sugar & shit that comes in a box marinated in gluten - abc123

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Saoirse View Post
                meanwhile my dad has type 2 diabetes (has never been overweight, never had a sweet tooth, and has always been physically active). He tries to control it through diet and exercise but is losing the battle. I introduced him to primal a while ago, and he says that's basically what he's doing anyway. he really doesn't want to be on meds, but doesn't see any alternative due to the way things are going. BTW, he has tried to manage through diet alone since his diagnosis 9 years ago. just wanted to balance the "fat, lazy diabetic" thing that seemed to be taking place.
                That's interesting, and I have heard reports like that before. Makes you wonder whether diabetes 2 is more multi factorial (ie. more complex) than presently thought.
                My website: http://www.shoppinganywhere.net/

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                • #9
                  yes. sort of off topic, but my kids all had ECC (early childhood caries) despite my best efforts. I hear news reports of the dramatic rise of ECC, and it's attributed to lazy neglectful parents who feed their kids soda in a bottle and all that crap. well, that certainly plays a role, but I know there are those of us who did what we could (above and beyond CW) and still ended up with extensive cavities. there's a part to this puzzle that we're not seeing, and it scares me because those of us who are trying and still failing are being mixed in with those who are just too lazy/discouraged to look for answers (and would be helped by just putting in the effort). My dad's diabetes and my kids ECC makes me wonder if there are shared genetic components to both.
                  my primal journal:
                  http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Saoirse View Post
                    just wanted to balance the "fat, lazy diabetic" thing that seemed to be taking place.
                    Guess I missed the fat, lazy, diabetic theme you found in the thread.

                    I do think replacing fat with sugar in the SAD diet might be a major factor for most folks struggling with type 2 diabetes.
                    It just strikes me as crazy that removing bread or sugar from your diet is considered whacky, but folks would understand and think surgery is an acceptable answer.

                    Other factors for adult onset are destruction of the pancreas by alcohol, disease, removal by surgery, or progressive failure of the pancreatic beta cells that produce the significant amounts of insulin.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Saoirse View Post
                      just wanted to balance the "fat, lazy diabetic" thing that seemed to be taking place.
                      Really? defensive much?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by springnr View Post
                        Guess I missed the fat, lazy, diabetic theme you found in the thread.

                        I do think replacing fat with sugar in the SAD diet might be a major factor for most folks struggling with type 2 diabetes.
                        It just strikes me as crazy that removing bread or sugar from your diet is considered whacky, but folks would understand and think surgery is an acceptable answer.

                        Other factors for adult onset are destruction of the pancreas by alcohol, disease, removal by surgery, or progressive failure of the pancreatic beta cells that produce the significant amounts of insulin.
                        not taking offense or anything, just saying that there's more to the picture than people who are slowly killing themselves. the picture isn't always as clear as we like to make it out to be. but yes, i get your point. i think the issue is that the mainstream doesn't take primal seriously and thus doesn't care to study it. also, i highly doubt they we study surgery in diabetic patients unless those patients were already obese, so maybe they thought that the surgery would have a benefit for the patients anyway. YKWIM? still doesn't make sense from our standpoint.

                        Originally posted by donlumber View Post
                        Really? defensive much?
                        no, not really. I just wish we had more concise answers for those who are struggling despite doing what they should.
                        my primal journal:
                        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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                        • #13
                          Lada

                          Originally posted by Saoirse View Post
                          meanwhile my dad has type 2 diabetes (has never been overweight, never had a sweet tooth, and has always been physically active). He tries to control it through diet and exercise but is losing the battle. I introduced him to primal a while ago, and he says that's basically what he's doing anyway. he really doesn't want to be on meds, but doesn't see any alternative due to the way things are going. BTW, he has tried to manage through diet alone since his diagnosis 9 years ago. just wanted to balance the "fat, lazy diabetic" thing that seemed to be taking place.
                          Saoirse, it sounds like your Dad does not have T2 Diabetes, he may have LADA, also known as Type 1.5.

                          It is estimated that 20% of people diagnosed as having non-obesity-related type 2 diabetes may actually have LADA. Islet cell, insulin, and GAD antibodies testing should be performed on all adults who are not obese that appear to present with type 2 diabetes. Many physicians or diabetes specialists don't recognize LADA or probably don't know the condition actually exists, and so LADA is misdiagnosed as or mistaken for Type 2 diabetes highly often.

                          People with LADA are insulin resistant like, but at prevalence levels less than, Type 2. Although some people having type 2 diabetes may inject insulin, in contrast, people with LADA require insulin injections around three to 12 years after so called type 2 diabetes diagnoses.

                          Essentially, LADA presents in adults as having impaired insulin production, which diminishes over time. It could make sense that no matter how careful your Dad is with restricting carbohydrates and exercising consistently, he's going to have a case of diminishing returns. If he hasn't already, I hope he gets tested.

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                          • #14
                            I've never heard of this, can you tell me more or send me to a reputable website?

                            *edit*
                            *g* nevermind, i googled it. thanks for the tip, i'll check into it and ask him if he has been tested.
                            my primal journal:
                            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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                            • #15
                              I follow this line of research carefully. In the Diabetes community, there is great hope that the mechanism will eventually be identified during the surgical procedure that puts the Diabetes in to remission. Eventually, the hope is that the surgery as it currently exists will not be necessary; that a more limited procedure will be identified that will halt the progress of the syndrome.

                              As a Type II Diabetic who does all the right stuff - healthy BMI, LCHF primal living, high intensity exercise, etc., and still needs oral medication to keep myself at the threshold of a 6.0 A1c, I will be the first volunteer to speak up and offer myself up as a research guinea pig. If most people knew how dire the potential consequences of Diabetes are, they wouldn't be so quick to dismiss the lengths people will go to in order to be cured.

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