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Is Vat-Grown Meat Kosher?

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  • Is Vat-Grown Meat Kosher?



    http://io9.com/5458425/is-vat+grown-meat-kosher-we-asked-a-rabbi


    In-vitro or cultured meat shows great potential for feeding our ever growing population. With a bit of work, it would take less area to manufacturer, have a smaller carbon footprint, and be less prone to disease and bacteria compared to traditionally grown farm animals.

    Hmmmmm....


    Me...thinks....not.


  • #2
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    The pork cells would have come from a pig to start with. So it's still pork, regardless if it's moving around on its feet or feeding nutrients in the vat.

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    • #3
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      Kosher Laws taken from JewishFaqs.com


      Certain animals may not be eaten at all. This restriction includes the flesh, organs, eggs and milk of the forbidden animals.

      Of the animals that may be eaten, the birds and mammals must be killed in accordance with Jewish law.

      All blood must be drained from meat and poultry or broiled out of it before it is eaten.

      Certain parts of permitted animals may not be eaten.

      Fruits and vegetables are permitted, but must be inspected for bugs (which cannot be eaten)

      Meat (the flesh of birds and mammals) cannot be eaten with dairy. Fish, eggs, fruits, vegetables and grains can be eaten with either meat or dairy. (According to some views, fish may not be eaten with meat).

      Utensils (including pots and pans and other cooking surfaces) that have come into contact with meat may not be used with dairy, and vice versa. Utensils that have come into contact with non-kosher food may not be used with kosher food. This applies only where the contact occurred while the food was hot.

      Grape products made by non-Jews may not be eaten.


      I am not Jewish, but if the meat wasn't pork I don't see why this would be a problem.

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      • #4
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        Invitro meat... um... no thanks. Talk about "processed"

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        • #5
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          I'm perfectly familiar with kashrut, the dietary laws. The reason Jews and Muslims don't eat pork, camels, or other such animals is the cleft hoof.


          In vitro pork would be sourced to cells that came from an animal with cleft hooves and in my not so rabbinical perspective, would be forbidden.


          Why would the believers not "play it safe?"


          arthu999, in vitro meat might be a valuable solution to the world not getting enough animal protein and a way to reduce the impact of meat production on the earth. Ironically, it is NOT "processed," in the usual context of taking an item, processing, and then getting a new item. Meat would still be meat, even if in some (perhaps not so palatable)form.

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          • #6
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            But the original question was simply Vat-Grown meat being Kosher or not. Lets say they come up with Vat-Grown beef. I assume that would be Kosher.

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            • #7
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              I think "Kosher" was being used in regards to aligning with the primal diet rather than Jewish law.


              Like OTB said, this could be a valid solution for providing enough meat to support an overpopulated planet. Structurally, is there really a significant difference between tissue that is synthesized by a complete organism or individual tissue replication? (I'm not asking a rhetorical question; I honestly don't know, and I hope that someone with a much better grasp of biology would be kind enough to fill me in.)

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              • #8
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                But they posted a link where they talked to a Rabbi about it. Anyways. Vat-grown meat is essentially cloned tissue, or tissue grown from stem cells. Biologically it should be the same basic tissue as meat pulled from an animal.

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                • #9
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                  Ah, my mistake, I apologize.

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                  • #10
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                    the resources used to produce something in vitro obliterate any supposed cheapness effect in distribution.

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                    • #11
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                      I'd be interested to find out what "cud" actually refers to in the dietary laws. Not sure how much corn they had access to in Mose's day.

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