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Cordain on Acid-Alkaline Balance: argument against zero carb?

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  • #16
    1



    Raphael, some people do use baking soda. But I worry that it would be much easier to overdose on baking soda than ACV.


    From the wikipedia entry on sodium bicarbonate:


    "Adverse reactions to the administration of sodium bicarbonate can include metabolic alkalosis, edema due to sodium overload, congestive heart failure, hyperosmolar syndrome, hypervolemic hypernatremia, and hypertension due to increased sodium. In patients who consume a high calcium or dairy-rich diet, calcium supplements, or calcium-containing antacids such as calcium carbonate (e.g., Tums), the use of sodium bicarbonate can cause milk-alkali syndrome, which can result in metastatic calcification, kidney stones, and kidney failure."


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_bicarbonate


    If you're generally healthy and stick with a few tablespoons (or less) of ACV per day, there doesn't seem to be any risk of screwing up blood chemistry.

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    • #17
      1



      Woah that's a lot of potential dangers! I asked because I heard it was a treatment for cancer. Thanks again for the info.

      ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º> ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><(( ((º>
      ><((((º> ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><(( ((º>

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      • #18
        1



        Has no one done any research on these acid/alkaline theories? If it comes from WebMd or PubMed I bet you would. Or the &#39;adrenal fatigue&#39; bugaboo!


        Head:rat&#39;s bootay.


        Anyone can discover the truth - but, don&#39;t let that interfere with your &#39;beliefs&#39;.


        It&#39;s bunk - plain, simple bunk.

        Comment


        • #19
          1



          Osa007 can you share your findings? Why is it BS?

          ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º> ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><(( ((º>
          ><((((º> ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><(( ((º>

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          • #20
            1



            Thanks for being a voice of reason Osa007.


            I don&#39;t disagree with the acid/base theory because I &#39;don&#39;t like veggies&#39;. I still eat some veggies, so I don&#39;t care one way or another.


            I don&#39;t believe it, because it sounds like rubbish, it doesn&#39;t make biological sense and there is no proof that it makes any difference.


            Here&#39;s one study I did find
            [quote]

            In conclusion, this meta-analysis does not support the concept that the calciuria associated with higher NAE reflects a net loss of whole body calcium. There is no evidence from superior quality balance studies that increasing the diet acid load promotes skeletal bone mineral loss or osteoporosis. Changes of urine calcium do not accurately represent calcium balance. Promotion of the "alkaline diet" to prevent calcium loss is not justified.
            </blockquote>


            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19419322?

            The "Seven Deadly Sins"

            • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
            • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
            • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

            Comment


            • #21
              1



              It seems most studies come to the same conclusions:
              [quote]

              CONCLUSION: All of the findings from this meta-analysis were contrary to the acid ash hypothesis. Higher phosphate intakes were associated with decreased urine calcium and increased calcium retention. This meta-analysis did not find evidence that phosphate intake contributes to demineralization of bone or to bone calcium excretion in the urine. Dietary advice that dairy products, meats, and grains are detrimental to bone health due to "acidic" phosphate content needs reassessment. There is no evidence that higher phosphate intakes are detrimental to bone health.
              </blockquote>


              http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19754972

              The "Seven Deadly Sins"

              • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
              • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
              • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

              Comment


              • #22
                1



                Anyone seen this? Sorry if someone&#39;s already posted the link

                http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.co...e-balance.html

                Comment


                • #23
                  1



                  Thanks Rozsa, I hadn&#39;t seen that link before.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    1



                    I guess Stephan&#39;s post puts the last nail in the coffin, thanks for the link Rozsa. And I second Pikaia on the vit D point, it&#39;s odd Cordain didn&#39;t make the connection. But then, and if I remember correctly, didn&#39;t he advocate a low saturated fat diet and the use of canola as well?


                    On a side note, I think we are creating a really cool information network here at MDA, promoting a multidisciplinary, evidence-based, analitical approach on nutrition. Great resource.

                    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      1



                      Perhaps that&#39;s why many zero carbers experience severe leg cramps if they have a drop of salt? Some imbalance is present there, in my opinion, and I&#39;m just basing this on what I read over at ZIOH.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        1



                        Leg cramps are due to an electrolyte (sodium/potassium) imbalance. I get leg cramps if I have a big dose of salt.


                        Low potassium from no veggies means it is easy to overdose on salt.


                        Grok didn&#39;t add salt to food. We aren&#39;t built to handle lots of it.

                        The "Seven Deadly Sins"

                        • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
                        • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
                        • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          1



                          Alkaline / acid balance was first discussed by Dr. Hay.

                          He published his diet in 1915.


                          The Hay system had 5 important rules.


                          1. Starches and sugars should not be eaten with proteins and acid fruits at the same meal.


                          2. Vegetables, salads and fruits should from the major part of the diet.


                          3. Protein, starches and fats should be eaten in small quantities.


                          4. Only whole grains and starches should be used, all refined processed foods should be taboo-in particular white flour and sugar and all foods made with them, and highly processed fats such as margarine.


                          5. An interval of four to four and half hours should should elapse between meals of different character.


                          Proteins require an acid medium for digestion. Our stomach produces hydrochloric acid to digest proteins.


                          Starches require an aklaine solution. This starts in our mouths with the action of ptaylin.


                          The short strokes is mixing our acid / alkaline foods mixes the digestive juices required to digest our foods... slowing it down... doing us a disservice... yada yada.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            1



                            grok salted food to preserve it, among other methods. so i don&#39;t buy the &#39;we can&#39;t eat a bit of salt&#39; thing.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              1



                              Did he? Or was that a neolithic solution? Anyone know?

                              Start weight: 250 - 06/2009
                              Current weight: 199
                              Goal: 145

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                1



                                I was just googling this yeasterday to get more information about it. All I found was 10 different sites claiming that acid foods where A, B & C and alkaline foods were D, E & F, and the next site was just the opposite.


                                I came to the conclusion that it&#39;s just a new form of CW because all the "most acidic" foods were meat, fat/oils, fish and eggs. "TO consume in moderation".

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