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Why organic food, Mark?

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  • #46
    1



    Okay...wow. A lot of information...and misinformation.


    Have any of the people who are for "conventional" farming and using DDT and other pesticides read "Silent Spring"? People who sprayed that stuff and similar pesticides DID have side effects, some of them even died. And as to birds dying? That only helps out some of the pests because they're not getting eaten by the birds (there's that nasty ecosystem thing coming into play). Plus, pests can become resistant resulting in use of stronger/more pesticides. Oh yes, the kicker...the buildup of DDT (and possibly other pesticides). Say an area is sprayed (or whatever). Great it killed the pests. Then an animal eats something contaminated with the pesticide. That animal now has a certain amount of pesticide in it. The more that the animal eats of the contaminated food, the more will REMAIN in it's body. Then that animal gets eaten by another animal (or human). Now that consuming animal gets the store of pesticide in it's body, plus all it's other food sources that are contaminated. I know this is one of the side effects of early pesticides, but I'm not sure if it's the same for today's pesticides. I would not like to take that chance.


    As for organic farming not being more nutritional, there are micronutrients that cannot be obtained from conventional farming. We need these micronutrients as much as we need phosphorus, nitrogen, and whatever the other macronutrient is. I learned this from someone who studied...I don't remember the correct name for it, but she studied farming/plants.


    I do agree that organic is not the most cost-effective nor "sustaining the whole population" thing. However, I just wanted to put some facts out there for you to think about.

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    • #47
      1



      I do the best I can with vegetables, although I eat a lot of frozen broccoli and spinach. However, I eat ONLY grass-fed beef or humanely raised pork, chicken, etc. I'd be a vegetarian (horrors) before I eat factory-farmed meat, not because it's bad for me (although it is)but because of the poor animals.


      My Thanksgiving turkey cost me $98, but I'd go without turkey before buying one from the supermarket.

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      • #48
        1



        @OTB, that's why I said that a lack of pesticides led to healthier land. Healthier land is always healthier for everything else on it. Including us. Also, you tend to defend positions that I am not on board with.

        Start weight: 250 - 06/2009
        Current weight: 199
        Goal: 145

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        • #49
          1



          $98 for a turkey?


          Lots of sweeping generalizations going on here that are rooted more in emotions and facts w/o substance.


          I am all for ridding our ag system of "'cides" as much as possible. I'm all for raising our dairy and meat animals as humanely as possible. I'm all for farmworker's good health. I was doing organic gardening when is was highly ridiculed, if a person even had a general idea of what it is.


          We have come a long way since Silent Spring about how we use pesticides and hormones and treat animals. Are we perfect yet? Hell, no. Are we doing things better? Absolutely.


          I was one of the first EPA certified applicators in Colorado, way back when the EPA was pretty new. I needed that in order to do certain things with my landscaping company. I'm guessing that I was doing some of these things, and I've seen many positive changes since some posters here were little sprats. Or not even.


          I guess I just don't deal well with ungrounded hysteria.

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          • #50
            1



            OTB, have you watched Food, Inc.? The treatment of animals raised for meat, dairy, and egg production is truly horrifying. It hasn't gotten better. It has gotten much, much worse.

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            • #51
              1



              Then just don't watch it. lol

              .`.><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>
              ><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>

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              • #52
                1



                http://www.newseum.org/pett/page_06.htm

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                • #53
                  1



                  Tune in next week, everyone, when I&#39;ll be providing my take on this organic debate!

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                  • #54
                    1



                    Can&#39;t wait, Mark :-)

                    Thanks for all you do!!!

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                    • #55
                      1



                      Haha, oh and I second the watching of Food, inc. I just watched it and it&#39;s not really biased either way, but they show how bad conventional growing can be. If you ask me, the way they conventionally grow crops and treat animals is quite terrible. I&#39;m all for grass fed beef, there&#39;s a big difference. You can&#39;t tell me that there is no difference, that&#39;s quite ridiculous. I shop at whole foods, although I know I can buy 50% of my food elsewhere cheaper. Just depends how smart you are about it. Personally I only want to eat grass fed beef if I can. It&#39;s much healthier, and I know the animals weren&#39;t sitting knee deep into their own crap being pumped with antibiotics. As far as produce goes, I&#39;ll try to eat locally grown or try to buy organic if it&#39;s cheaper.

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                      • #56
                        1



                        The ideal would be to buy everything single source, organic, free-trade, free range, all-natural, blah blah et cetera and so on and so forth. However, that quickly becomes quite expensive for the majority of people, so the second best yet still quite beneficial approach is to minimize the amount of pesticides and other chemical nasties ingested.


                        You should buy organic when it comes to the dirtiest crops, such as spinach or apples. You should also buy organic or grassfed meats, free-range poultry, and wild fish. Dairy should also be organic if you buy it; basically, any animal product is best when minimally processed.


                        You shouldn&#39;t buy organic when it comes to crops that are grown most cleanly, such as avocadoes, which have thick inedible skins that don&#39;t easily absorb pesticides.


                        I used to spend most of my money at Whole Foods, but now I buy the majority of groceries at Trader Joes. The products are high quality and of suitable origin. They even have grass-fed beef. I only buy vegetables at Whole Foods, less wasteful packaging than Traders, and sometimes even cheaper by pound.

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                        • #57
                          1



                          it&#39;s only expensive because many people haven&#39;t realised that a part of real sustainability means providing some of your own food and connecting with your local community of food producers.


                          in some ways, not embracing seasonality and regionality in one&#39;s diet make it harder to stay primally oriented, because you lose that access to rhythms that Grok had to just accept and live around.


                          this idea that only a handful of people are supposed to grow food is extremely recent (even nobles did some hunting and gardening of their own).


                          life gets a lot less expensive and stressful when you can be food-sufficient, remain close with your local community and thus not need a high salary. and less stress is definitely primal.

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                          • #58
                            1



                            It tastes better.


                            You can&#39;t convince me that tomatoes I find in a store that came from Mexico are "the same" as ones I plucked off the vine in my greenhouse. Once you&#39;ve tasted real food, you don&#39;t go back. I&#39;ve tasted and seen the difference for myself.


                            I think that has little to do with food that&#39;s certified organic as well. My food in my garden, my greenhouse, my farmers market, very little of it is certified. But I know what I put on it, and I know what my farmers put on it. The beef I get comes from a farm 45 minutes away. They&#39;re not certified organic, but they don&#39;t use hormones or antibiotics and welcome visitors. I think that is key to finding real food. Visit or do it yourself. If you don&#39;t like what you see, don&#39;t put it in your mouth.

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                            • #59
                              1



                              Skeptic...

                              You trust the EPA!!??

                              Really?

                              Do a little reading on fluoride. Then take another look at trusting the EPA (and the FDA for that matter).

                              Once I realized what fluoride does to the body, I got a whole house filter to get rid of that stuff. Then I stopped trusting the EPA and the FDA.

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