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Why organic food, Mark?

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  • #31
    1



    I ain't an expert or anything, but pesticides, which are designed to kill things, are doubtfully going to be beneficial to humans.


    My two cents

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    • #32
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      Katt, while I fully agree that pesticide free food is the best way to go, many pesticides have little or no effect on us mammals. Remember DDT? Do you recall why it was banned? No, not because it was bad for us, but bad for birds.


      The organophosphate class of pesticides is hugely toxic during use, not so much as residue.


      Genetic manipulation and hybridization has been going on both naturally and man-assisted for thousands of years. Picking seeds for increased vigor, larger produce, whatever.


      I'm saying, long windedly, it's not so black and white.


      Normal, natural, foods, wild or organic, have toxic components, but our bodies handle them nicely, BTW.

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      • #33
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        as a young married couple who just bought their first house this year. sure, i'd love to buy all those $$ expensive goods but i live in a climate with 4 seasons!


        in the summer time i support a local CSA which is great but in the winter months i buy frozen brocc/cauliflower/blueberries and in the produce aisle- non-organic greens, apples, oranges and squash. i adhere to a more seasonal eating approach simply because it's a lot more cost effective. i feel that in the long run this won't make me "suffer" compared to other PB followers eating organic.

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        • #34
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          Easy solution to all of this..grow your own.

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          • #35
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            complicated topic. too many variables. Its too hard to understand all the impacts of any farming practices. Make your own decision based on believes and economics.


            I'm pro poop, it is within our genetic experience to ingest animal poop.

            It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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            • #36
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              Just grow them like your grandma did.

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              • #37
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                My grandmothers never did.


                But lest we all get teary eyed for a golden past existing only in our minds, remember than in those years they absolutely did not garden what we would call organically.


                My mother and father were typical post-war "back to the land" types and they saw nothing wrong with DDT or chemical fertilizers. And prior to DDT, people saw nothing wrong with "'cides" made from lead, arsenic, copper, lye, and worse.


                Then a lot of produce went into jars, often with lots of sugar.


                I think I hear some bubbles popping......

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                • #38
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                  Like many of you I am skeptical about the benefits v trade-offs of organic produce but I DEFINITELY am sold on pastured animals v CAFOs.

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                  • #39
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                    True. And remember if Great great Grandpa's crops failed it could be one of his kids starving to death.


                    No need for rose tinted specs - but "progress" isn't always better either!

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                    • #40
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                      Saying "No one will ever convince me.." is the least objective thing you can say. Ever. I also feel it noteworthy that there is nothing natural at all about tilling soil, infusing it with manure and forcing plant life to grow in it. So really, the tampering with nature argument is moot.


                      I don't think the environmental argument holds much water either. The earth is a fantastic mechanism of life, it has been battered by meteors, solar flares, earth quakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, forest fires, nuclear warheads, you name it.. And it is still here, more vibrant and active than ever. In that perspective, it doesn't seem so awful spraying some chemicals into an area of surface dirt equivalent to a speck on the global scale. Also let us not forget, anything we put into the environment, synthetic or organic, all originated from the earth, I'm pretty sure the earth will adapt to it.


                      Our bodies are also magnificent, adaptable machines that respond to what we put in to it, just like any other machine. "Garbage in, garbage out" as they say. Even so, the body has mechanisms to expel that which is not desired, in reasonable amounts. Without doing a fact check here, I'm willing to go out on a limb and say that anything you eat already contains worse things than the synthetic pesticide residue.

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                      • #41
                        1



                        I eat the vegetables I grow in organic raised beds in my own yard, no pesticides but lots of homegrown compost and worm castings. When my veggies aren't in season, I buy onions, garlic, green veggies from my local supermarket, but not much else. I eat eggs from my own chickens, cream and butter from a nearby grass-fed farm, and otherwise, grass-finished beef and pork. It's not that difficult to avoid most pesticides if you're willing to do a little bit of labor.

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                        • #42
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                          Sharonll, that is awesome that you do all that, I'll bet it is quite rewarding eating a meal you grew (mostly) yourself


                          I certainly don't aim to discourage you from doing what you want to do, but I ask everyone to truly and objectively weigh all the benefits and risks, using valid data. If you consider all of that labor to be work, then you should consider the impact that has on your life and determine whether or not that time and expense could be employed in something even more enriching.


                          I just can't ignore the conventional method's proven track record of safety and commit to the much greater expense of organic simply to alleviate fear of something that I already know is not harmful to me. That is just being practical.

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                          • #43
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                            I grow almost all of my own produce (which I freeze) for winter use without the use of pesticides or artificial fertilizers. We use vegetable kitchen waste for compost along with horse and chicken manure which makes an excellent base for growing in raised bed gardens. The beds are extremely easy to maintain - no tilling, except a simple raking through in the spring, and some easy weeding. No pesticides except some hungry chickens which do a great job of removing bugs. I buy mostly heirloom seeds and plants because they produce better tasting vegetables compared to the hybridized ones made for producing market vegetables. The hybrid plants often are developed to make produce that is made to last or be extra firm for market, not for taste. I use some hybrids - mostly those developed many decades ago that are resistant to fungi or viral infestations and were developed for taste. GMO vegetables involve another species - usually bacteria - to insert new genetic material. This is not the same as hybridization to select from genetic material already present in the plant.


                            Having bought grain-fed meats in the past and now buying grass-fed beef and pasture-raised chickens and pork (they are omnivorous), I can say first-hand that there is a huge difference in taste. The naturally-fed animals taste better - hands down. Same for the vegetables. If you want to taste a real summer tomato, come to my house this summer

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                            • #44
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                              Oh, and no bubbles were burst for me. I learned to garden this way from my dad, who learned it from his dad, etc. Most old-time farmers growing for their families, did not want to waste hard-earned money on fancy chemicals or fertilizers.

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                              • #45
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                                I don't want this to turn into a political debate as it may. I'm not going to go nuts on the advantages of organic almonds or blueberries vs. regular but know this. Saying that grass-fed beef is no better than regular store bought is just - plain - stupid. Do the research and eat for yourself, not your politics.

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