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Wired.com Article - Revised Paleo Diet

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  • Wired.com Article - Revised Paleo Diet

    http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/20...eolithic-diet/

    Thoughts? Comments? Implications?

  • #2
    I'm not sure if this is providing hard-hitting evidence that grains were in fact eaten. Assuming it does, it still doesn't change the fact that grains are by and large unhealthy but can, if one chooses, be consumed in moderation. I would say, if Paleo man was using some grains, it probably still didn't make up the bulk of their diet.
    I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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    • #3
      Meh. Could be true, could not.

      Doesn't matter much to me, all I know is how I eat now makes me feel and look the best I ever have, so I am sticking to it.
      - If it was cute and cuddly at some point, eat it. Ignore everything else. -

      - Food is first, and foremost, nothing more than fuel. -

      - The body is animal. The mind, however, is not. -

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      • #4
        "Humanity’s stone age ancestors, long thought to have practiced a prehistoric version of the Atkins diet, may have eaten a balanced diet after all." This whole article has a "grains are good" slant right from the start, implying that a diet without grains is clearly unbalanced.

        I wouldn't argue that this mortar and pestle may have been used to process grain-like materials, but the article makes far reaching suggestions that this one mortar and pestle means that all paleolithic humans ate similar things. The one thing that we see in modern hunter-gatherer societies is the variance in their diets, and adaption based on the local environment.

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        • #5
          ferns and cattails are considered grains? or grain-like? I thought ferns were those frondy things that grow in the shade and cattails were those caterpillar looking doo-dads that grow near water.
          Heather and the hounds - Make a Fast Friend, Adopt a Greyhound!

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          • #6
            I don't know if this is the same info that came out a couple months ago but I want to say Mark had a post about it if so. Also, if it is what I saw previously some people talked about them grinding up grains to make a paint-like substance or something like that. I believe Mark said that even if they had eaten some grains they certainly didn't make them the mainstay in their diet.

            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/stone-age-grains/
            Last edited by leonardotmnt; 10-18-2010, 01:47 PM. Reason: Added link

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by kennelmom View Post
              ferns and cattails are considered grains? or grain-like? I thought ferns were those frondy things that grow in the shade and cattails were those caterpillar looking doo-dads that grow near water.
              My understanding is that grains are essentially the edible portion of the seeds of grasses. I don't know if cattails are grasses or not. I certainly don't think that ferns are grasses.

              The whole article was very over-reaching and right from the start you could see that they were trying to force an endpoint of "grains are paleolithic too".

              Comment


              • #8
                I think they mean grain as a small piece of something. Grains of starchy plants. This other article about the same discovery claims they were eating ROOTS, as in sweet potatoes, not grains, as in wheat.
                Height: 5'4" (1.62 m)
                Starting weight (09/2009): 200 lb (90.6 kg)
                No longer overweight (08/2010): 145 lb (65.6 kg)
                Current weight (01/2012): 127 lb (57.5 kg)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mirrorball View Post
                  I think they mean grain as a small piece of something. Grains of starchy plants.
                  Which is totally stupid, because they clearly try to make the extension to the modern grains.

                  Breaking news: Mummified human found with grains of sand embedded in teeth. More evidence that a balanced diet containing grains was consumed by ancestors.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lcme View Post
                    breaking news: Mummified human found with grains of sand embedded in teeth. More evidence that a balanced diet containing grains was consumed by ancestors.
                    lol!
                    Height: 5'4" (1.62 m)
                    Starting weight (09/2009): 200 lb (90.6 kg)
                    No longer overweight (08/2010): 145 lb (65.6 kg)
                    Current weight (01/2012): 127 lb (57.5 kg)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I love archaeology. You can critique the newspaper reporting of any subject you actually know about, not only paleo. Makes you think about all the stuff you read on subjects you don't have much background in.
                      If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lcme View Post
                        My understanding is that grains are essentially the edible portion of the seeds of grasses. I don't know if cattails are grasses or not. I certainly don't think that ferns are grasses.
                        Cattails are grasses AFAIK, but their roots aren't "grains". Ferns are plants that reproduce via spores. Also not grains. And even if waybacks were eating some "grains" (ie grass seeds, I don't disbelieve it) they weren't making pizza, pasta and sammiches the staple of their diet.

                        Originally posted by lcme View Post
                        Breaking news: Mummified human found with grains of sand embedded in teeth. More evidence that a balanced diet containing grains was consumed by ancestors.
                        There's a grain of truth in what you say. I took it with a grain of salt. I'm chalking it up to my 20%.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It's strange that Yahoo has a different synopsis of the exact same study (by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) but says something quite different which in my mind is completely consistent with what we conceive of as Paleo nutrition. Here is how the Yahoo study described the findings:

                          "The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) journal on Monday, indicate that Palaeolithic Europeans ground down plant roots similar to potatoes to make flour, which was later whisked into dough."

                          This is plant roots and tubers, it is not grains. Guess it just goes to show you have to read the original source and cannot rely on others to characterize it for you, here is a link to the yahoo article.

                          http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20101018/...nm/india522760

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                          • #14
                            After a few re-reads of the article I realize that it never meant grains in the neolithic sense. I guess I was just thrown off by the statement that they made in the first sentence.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lcme View Post
                              After a few re-reads of the article I realize that it never meant grains in the neolithic sense. I guess I was just thrown off by the statement that they made in the first sentence.
                              An editor recently told me that titles only have to catch the readers eye. They don't have to say what the article is about. The reader has to read the article to find that out. The article was probably just wrote that way to get maximum attention.
                              A steak a day keeps the doctor away

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